09.28.14 Delving into the Rogue Valley ….

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon

Sunday, 28th of September, 2014
~ Ashland, Oregon ~

The adventuring trio, away from the shop on their days off from merchanting, decided to head into the hills looking for Gold and treasures to add to their shop’s offerings. Resting the night in Grants Pass, Oregon, they awoke and headed north to Wolf Creek to visit the Circle of Wolves Metaphysical/Pagan shop as they were going out of business and hoping to gain some goods. A pit stop at the Grants Pass Goodwill attributed some goodies as Halloween season is beginning to bloom. They were going to stop into downtown Grants Pass to get some pics of the artsy bears along Main street, and to much disappointment found that they were all gone. Asleep. In Hibernation. They made Wolf Creek too early for the Circle of Wolves, as they wouldn’t be opening until 2 pm. A peek at the historic Wolf Creek Tavern they decided to drive up into the hills to buy some time and look for the Witch Camp. They passed “Fay Lane” wondering if that would be the spot? They saw nothing in the hills but Western replicas of the Appalachian folk Hillbilly homesteads. Intriguing they thought, probably the ancestral homes of the Hillbillies that went west for the Gold Rush. Same style houses, porches, rocking chairs, and trashy yards. While climbing around the hills they discovered an old Gold mining Ghost town called Golden, Oregon. It was pretty neat, and just in time as they were about to have a wedding in the old crumbling wooden church, so was able to explore the church and the school house without any interruptions. The schoolhouse Sir Thomas thought looked like it was moved to the spot it is now located, looks like the local historical society has plans to make the ghost town a tourist attraction. It was very picturesque to see the young Faerie prince of Endurance stand before the abandoned school room and the church so see a different evolution of the world take effect. Sir Thomas Leaf thought to himself how exciting it is going to be to explore history – ancient and modern together with his son. They met the photographer for the wedding, and she told them she was from Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates. So they thought they would waste more time until 2 pm came along by visiting that town. Onwards north they passed through some even more “Odd Oregon” sites – VW bugs fashioned to giant spider legs as modern art, and a trashy yard with a banner warning “Jeremy Nordstrom” not to trespass or he’d be shot.

After finishing their adventures, they stopped for sushi at Sir Thomas’ favorite restaurant in Grant’s Pass. After full bellies they returned to Ashland preparing for another day running The Leaf and Dragon. Back at the RV, they took a swim in the RV park pool, a walk with the Prince, took turns at the showers and retired to a satisfying day of explorations.

Merlin, Oregon

Grants Pass, Oregon

Mileage: 198

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The Ruble Church – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivi

Monument/Graveside marker by The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The schoolhouse – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivin

The schoolhouse – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivin

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The schoolhouse – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivin

The schoolhouse – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivin

The schoolhouse – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivin

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ruble Church – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivi

The Ruble Church – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivi

The Ruble Church – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivi

The Ruble Church – The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thrivi

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

The Ghost town of Golden, Oregon. Wild West and Goldmining. “Golden: Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer on Grave Creek for Refreshments. Rev. William Ruble, Leader of a group commonly known as “Campbellites” built the church in 1852. He was ordained and the church simultaneously dedicated by county judge stephen Jewell. Shortly afterward it became the free Methodist church. Another group led by Rev. mark Davis used the schoolhouse for their services, both ministers worked local mining claims. Placer activity on Coyote creek began in the 1850’s. Abandoning these claims during the Idaho gold rush of 1860, the men returned to find them being worked by about 500 Chinese for ten cents per day plus rice. The Chinese contractor yielded possession. A 2 1/2 mile pipeline supplied water for the “Giants” (hydraulic nozzles) resulting in the recovery of one and 1/2 million dollars in the next few years. The Josephine county school superintendent Lincoln Savage, traveled by train from Grant’s Pass to Wolk Creek, rode his bicycle to Golden, and continued to the greenback mine by tramway to visit the schools. Wilma Gilkey and Edith Allen were among the early teachers. As late as 1906, there were still 36 children in this school. ” ~ information sign by the Josephine County Historical Society, Golden, Oregon. “At its height betwen 1900 and 1920 Golden spread across several acres. At its center stood the church, and on its right, the Rubles’ beautiful fruit filled orchard. Mothers, fathers, and children walked up the church steps together many times each year, gathering for worship and encouragement in good times and bad. In the late 19th century, rough-and-ready boom towns sprang up wherever there was gold, and just as quickly faded away. Golden was different. With the Ruble elevator bringing in a consistent profit, the 1890s found Golden growing into a thriving family-centered

Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale High School: Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Deforestation above Riddle, Oregon. Sure we need lumber and building materials, but come on – deforestation as destruction and sadness. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Deforestation above Riddle, Oregon. Sure we need lumber and building materials, but come on – deforestation as destruction and sadness. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Deforestation above Riddle, Oregon. Sure we need lumber and building materials, but come on – deforestation as destruction and sadness. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Sunflowers above Riddle, Oregon. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Lumber processing plant near Riddle / Glendale, Oregon – Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Lumber processing plant near Riddle / Glendale, Oregon – Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Glendale, Oregon – Home of the Pirates (Glendale High School). Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Lumber industry. Stacks of lumber from deforestation of Oregon outside of Glendale, Oregon. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Lumber industry. Stacks of lumber from deforestation of Oregon outside of Glendale, Oregon. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Lumber industry. Stacks of lumber from deforestation of Oregon outside of Glendale, Oregon. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Lumber industry. Stacks of lumber from deforestation of Oregon outside of Glendale, Oregon. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Lumber industry. Stacks of lumber from deforestation of Oregon outside of Glendale, Oregon. Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

The Militant Hippie, Merlin, Oregon – Sunday, September 28th, 2014. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

The Caveman Statue, Tourist Information Center, Grants Pass, Oregon.
“The Oregon Cavemen: The Oregon Cavemen claiming to be direct descendants of the Neanderthal Man of Ancient Times incorporated as a unit Oct 1922 in a ceremony held secretly in the depths of the Oregon Caves … Their claimed Homeland and a National Monument. The cavemen is composed of local businessmen who travel far and wide spreading good will and tourist information. They appear at openings of National and Local interest alike. They appeared at the Opening of the Golden Gate Bridge, A Broadway show and the Bay Area’s Treasure Island Exposition … just to mention a few. The cavemen dressed in animal skins, wearing horsehair wigs, buck teeth and ‘big horns’ ran rampant in parades and gatherings of the public, and usually have with them a rustic cage in which they imprison their victims and display them for the public to see. They are always on hand for a prank or a joke to be played on an important personality visiting in Grant’s Pass or elsewhere and are quick to seize and capture pretty girls who look like they could take a joke. Their main purpose as an organization is to publicize Grants Pass and Josephine County. Their “ritual” include orientation of the members in the geographical and scenic features of the Caveman Domain and instruction in the caveman ‘tactics’ of greeting visitors, including presentation of an inscribed chamois. Also, there are ‘secret rites’ of initiation and installation of officers. The governing body of the cavemen is kept within a small circle of officers including ‘Chief Bighorn’, ‘Rising Buck’, ‘Wingfeather’ and ‘Keeper of the Wampum.’ Also they have council of ‘Eagle Eyes’ serving as board of directors. The Cavemen make their own rules as they go along, always calculated for the most fun and the best gag at the moment. With each new trick and each visit to a new area, they spread the word for Grants Pass and Josephine County, calling everyone to come and see t

The Caveman Statue, Tourist Information Center, Grants Pass, Oregon.
“The Oregon Cavemen: The Oregon Cavemen claiming to be direct descendants of the Neanderthal Man of Ancient Times incorporated as a unit Oct 1922 in a ceremony held secretly in the depths of the Oregon Caves … Their claimed Homeland and a National Monument. The cavemen is composed of local businessmen who travel far and wide spreading good will and tourist information. They appear at openings of National and Local interest alike. They appeared at the Opening of the Golden Gate Bridge, A Broadway show and the Bay Area’s Treasure Island Exposition … just to mention a few. The cavemen dressed in animal skins, wearing horsehair wigs, buck teeth and ‘big horns’ ran rampant in parades and gatherings of the public, and usually have with them a rustic cage in which they imprison their victims and display them for the public to see. They are always on hand for a prank or a joke to be played on an important personality visiting in Grant’s Pass or elsewhere and are quick to seize and capture pretty girls who look like they could take a joke. Their main purpose as an organization is to publicize Grants Pass and Josephine County. Their “ritual” include orientation of the members in the geographical and scenic features of the Caveman Domain and instruction in the caveman ‘tactics’ of greeting visitors, including presentation of an inscribed chamois. Also, there are ‘secret rites’ of initiation and installation of officers. The governing body of the cavemen is kept within a small circle of officers including ‘Chief Bighorn’, ‘Rising Buck’, ‘Wingfeather’ and ‘Keeper of the Wampum.’ Also they have council of ‘Eagle Eyes’ serving as board of directors. The Cavemen make their own rules as they go along, always calculated for the most fun and the best gag at the moment. With each new trick and each visit to a new area, they spread the word for Grants Pass and Josephine County, calling everyone to come and see t

The Caveman Statue, Tourist Information Center, Grants Pass, Oregon.
“The Oregon Cavemen: The Oregon Cavemen claiming to be direct descendants of the Neanderthal Man of Ancient Times incorporated as a unit Oct 1922 in a ceremony held secretly in the depths of the Oregon Caves … Their claimed Homeland and a National Monument. The cavemen is composed of local businessmen who travel far and wide spreading good will and tourist information. They appear at openings of National and Local interest alike. They appeared at the Opening of the Golden Gate Bridge, A Broadway show and the Bay Area’s Treasure Island Exposition … just to mention a few. The cavemen dressed in animal skins, wearing horsehair wigs, buck teeth and ‘big horns’ ran rampant in parades and gatherings of the public, and usually have with them a rustic cage in which they imprison their victims and display them for the public to see. They are always on hand for a prank or a joke to be played on an important personality visiting in Grant’s Pass or elsewhere and are quick to seize and capture pretty girls who look like they could take a joke. Their main purpose as an organization is to publicize Grants Pass and Josephine County. Their “ritual” include orientation of the members in the geographical and scenic features of the Caveman Domain and instruction in the caveman ‘tactics’ of greeting visitors, including presentation of an inscribed chamois. Also, there are ‘secret rites’ of initiation and installation of officers. The governing body of the cavemen is kept within a small circle of officers including ‘Chief Bighorn’, ‘Rising Buck’, ‘Wingfeather’ and ‘Keeper of the Wampum.’ Also they have council of ‘Eagle Eyes’ serving as board of directors. The Cavemen make their own rules as they go along, always calculated for the most fun and the best gag at the moment. With each new trick and each visit to a new area, they spread the word for Grants Pass and Josephine County, calling everyone to come and see t

The Caveman Statue, Tourist Information Center, Grants Pass, Oregon.
“The Oregon Cavemen: The Oregon Cavemen claiming to be direct descendants of the Neanderthal Man of Ancient Times incorporated as a unit Oct 1922 in a ceremony held secretly in the depths of the Oregon Caves … Their claimed Homeland and a National Monument. The cavemen is composed of local businessmen who travel far and wide spreading good will and tourist information. They appear at openings of National and Local interest alike. They appeared at the Opening of the Golden Gate Bridge, A Broadway show and the Bay Area’s Treasure Island Exposition … just to mention a few. The cavemen dressed in animal skins, wearing horsehair wigs, buck teeth and ‘big horns’ ran rampant in parades and gatherings of the public, and usually have with them a rustic cage in which they imprison their victims and display them for the public to see. They are always on hand for a prank or a joke to be played on an important personality visiting in Grant’s Pass or elsewhere and are quick to seize and capture pretty girls who look like they could take a joke. Their main purpose as an organization is to publicize Grants Pass and Josephine County. Their “ritual” include orientation of the members in the geographical and scenic features of the Caveman Domain and instruction in the caveman ‘tactics’ of greeting visitors, including presentation of an inscribed chamois. Also, there are ‘secret rites’ of initiation and installation of officers. The governing body of the cavemen is kept within a small circle of officers including ‘Chief Bighorn’, ‘Rising Buck’, ‘Wingfeather’ and ‘Keeper of the Wampum.’ Also they have council of ‘Eagle Eyes’ serving as board of directors. The Cavemen make their own rules as they go along, always calculated for the most fun and the best gag at the moment. With each new trick and each visit to a new area, they spread the word for Grants Pass and Josephine County, calling everyone to come and see t

The Caveman Statue, Tourist Information Center, Grants Pass, Oregon.
“The Oregon Cavemen: The Oregon Cavemen claiming to be direct descendants of the Neanderthal Man of Ancient Times incorporated as a unit Oct 1922 in a ceremony held secretly in the depths of the Oregon Caves … Their claimed Homeland and a National Monument. The cavemen is composed of local businessmen who travel far and wide spreading good will and tourist information. They appear at openings of National and Local interest alike. They appeared at the Opening of the Golden Gate Bridge, A Broadway show and the Bay Area’s Treasure Island Exposition … just to mention a few. The cavemen dressed in animal skins, wearing horsehair wigs, buck teeth and ‘big horns’ ran rampant in parades and gatherings of the public, and usually have with them a rustic cage in which they imprison their victims and display them for the public to see. They are always on hand for a prank or a joke to be played on an important personality visiting in Grant’s Pass or elsewhere and are quick to seize and capture pretty girls who look like they could take a joke. Their main purpose as an organization is to publicize Grants Pass and Josephine County. Their “ritual” include orientation of the members in the geographical and scenic features of the Caveman Domain and instruction in the caveman ‘tactics’ of greeting visitors, including presentation of an inscribed chamois. Also, there are ‘secret rites’ of initiation and installation of officers. The governing body of the cavemen is kept within a small circle of officers including ‘Chief Bighorn’, ‘Rising Buck’, ‘Wingfeather’ and ‘Keeper of the Wampum.’ Also they have council of ‘Eagle Eyes’ serving as board of directors. The Cavemen make their own rules as they go along, always calculated for the most fun and the best gag at the moment. With each new trick and each visit to a new area, they spread the word for Grants Pass and Josephine County, calling everyone to come and see t

Historic Wolf Creek Tavern – Wolf Creek, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Historic Wolf Creek Tavern – Wolf Creek, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Circle of Wolves metaphysical shop, Wolf Creek, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Wolf Creek, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Historic Wolf Creek Tavern – Wolf Creek, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

VW Bug Spiders – garbage art at Wolf Creek, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

VW Bug Spiders – garbage art at Wolf Creek, Oregon. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Banner outside of some ranch/home near Wolf Creek, Oregon – “Jeremy Nordstrom No trespassing you will be seen as a threat and fired upon without any further warning”. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

Banner outside of some ranch/home near Wolf Creek, Oregon – “Jeremy Nordstrom No trespassing you will be seen as a threat and fired upon without any further warning”. Exploring Southern Oregon: Golden – Wolf Creek – Merlin – Grant’s Pass – Glendale, Oregon, USA. Photography (c) 2014 Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

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