Stacked Rocks and Cairns

Cairns (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3289). Exploring the Oregon - Nevada - California Borderlands: Chronicle 21 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken May 15, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409.    To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Potential power quest cairns (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3289)

Potential power quest cairns (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3289)

Cairns and Stacked Rocks
By Thomas Baurley

The stacking of stones is a widespread cultural practice all around the world. You know it is a remnant of modern, historical, or prehistoric cultural manufacture because they were not placed there by nature. Most likely a “human” moved one stone atop another. They vary in size from one or two rocks or more stacked on top of each other in simplicity to complexity of mounds, cairns, pyramids, tombs, and massive megalithic complexes.

The meaning behind the practice varies between cultures and time periods throughout history. Archaeologists however, are only interested in those that are at least 50 years old (historical archaeology in America), 100 years old (Europe and other parts of the world), or prehistoric (hundreds to thousands of years in age). They can be field clearing piles, fence piles, burial mounds, markers, signifiers, monuments, spiritual tools, graves, food stores, game drives, rock alignments, power quest markers, altars, shrines, prayer seats, hearths, circles, and/or memorials. Their uses can vary from remnants of field clearing for plowing, stabilizing fences, make walls, clearing or road construction, markers of a road trail or path, survey markers, memorial, burial, vision quest marker, or part of something bigger like a structure, burial, tomb, underground chamber, prayer seat, tipi ring, or offering to Gods, spirits, entities.

These commonly can be found along streams, creeks, lakes, springs, rivers, waterways, sea cliffs, beaches, in the desert, tundra, in uplands, on mountaintops, ridges, peaks, and hill tops. In underpopulated areas they can represent emergency location points. North American trail markers are often called “ducks” or “duckies” because they have a “beak” that points in the direction of the route. Coastal cairns or “sea markers” are common in the northern latitudes can indicate navigation marking and sometimes are notated on navigation charts. Sometimes these are painted and are visible from off shore. This is a common practice in Iceland, Greenland, Canada, and Scandinavia.

Cairns / stacked rocks (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3289).

Cairns / stacked rocks (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3289).

ROCK STACKS

Often the practice of stacking rocks is used to mark a trail, path, or road. Many say without these markings, it is often hard to follow a laid out trail, especially in areas that receive deep snowfall. When modern cairn builders place their “art” or message of ego along a trail they can be causing harm, hiding the true trail markers and if placed in a wrong place can lead a hiker astray or get them lost. Original use is often as a route marker and it’s important to preserve that integrity. Modern application of this practice can not only lead people astray but disrupt cultural studies, archaeology, geology, and the environment. Moving stones can upset plant life, insect habitats, as well as homes of lizards, rats, mice, and other creatures.

Other times these rock stacks have spiritual or religious purpose. These are sometimes offerings to the little people, fairies, faeries, nature spirits, Saints, entities, or God/desses. Sometimes these are arranged for a vision quest, other times as a prayer seat, or part of a stone circle. Many times if found around rivers, streams, creeks, or springs – they are offerings to the nature spirits, water spirits, nymphs, naiads, and/or dryads. Sometimes these are markers for portals, vortexes, gateways between worlds, lei lines, or places of spiritual importance. They honor spirits, Deities, Ancestors, or the Dead.

Sometimes these stacked rocks are considered “art”, a meditative exercise, or something someone does out of boredom.

Prince Cian making Cairns (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3289).

Prince Cian making Cairns

In spiritual “new age” hotspots, modern creations of these “cairns” or “rock stacks” are actually quite problematic because they have become invasive upon the landscape, blocking access or movement. In addition, modern creations of them destroy, hide, or change importance of historical or prehistoric ones that existed before. This is a similar impact between modern graffiti and rock art. This has become a major problem in places like Sedona Arizona; Telluride, Colorado; Arches National Park, Utah.

Prehistoric use

Aborigines, Natives, Tribes, and Original Peoples have utilized cairns and rock stacks all over the world. Mostly the intent was as a “marker”. In the Americas, various tribes such as the Paiutes as well as early Pioneers left them to mark important trails or historic roads. The Inuksuk practice used by the Inuit, Inupiat, Kalaallit, Yupik, and other Arctic aborigines in North America ranging from Alaska to Greenland to Iceland are markers for “way finding” and to locate caches of food, supplies, and other goods.

Cairns and rock stacks have been used prehistorically for hunting, defense, burials, ceremonial structures, astronomical structures or markers.

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Offerings of the Naiads Book Project

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Please help fund our research project and publication of our book “Offerings of the Naiads: Holy Wells and Sacred Springs in Western Culture” by our Founders.

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St. Colmcille’s Well (Swords, Ireland)

Sord Chomcille Well - St. Colmcille Well - holy well by bar/grill
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24179; 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Sord Chomcille Well - St. Colmcille Well - holy well by bar/grill http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24179; 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Sord Chomcille Well – St. Colmcille Well .

Sord Chomcille Well – St. Colmcille or St. Columb’s Well
Well Road, Swords, Ireland
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24179

This is the infamous holy well that “Swords” was named after. It was here that St. Colmcille came in 560 C.E., remarked of its clear or pure waters (Irish: Sord) and blessed the waters making it a holy well. The water was so clear that it was described as being almost invisible and was renowned for its curative properties for sore eyes.

The very founding place name point of interest of this town sits in disrepair, in a locked chamber, crunched between a private parking space and apartment complexes. It is so disregarded and unknown that when inquiring at the historical society’s information center, asking two volunteers in 2014 where we could find the well – they dumbfoundedly looked at each other not knowing what I meant by “holy well”. I could only hope that the city and its historical society has since taken better interest and caretaking of this important monument in the city.

The legend goes is that St. Colmcille founded the Holy Well by taking a “Giant Step” from the Round Tower and landing at the spot where this well is. Of course this 1950’s and 1960’s child’s tale precluding the simple humble St. Colmcille was indeed a giant which he was not. Originally this was one of the town’s wells where residents of Swords would go, especially during summer months when the town’s water pumps ran dry, bringing home water for cooking and washing. Then as a “holy well” pilgrims would attend the well for small amounts to take home to use to bless their homes. It was eventually placed in a well house behind a steel door with a water pump installed street side. The well was refurbished in 1991 by the Swords Historical Society to ensure that the well remain a lasting memorial to the Patron of Swords.

Location: pump and well : N 53° 31.336 W 006° 04.942; UTM 29U E 693408 N 5934332. Waymark Code: WM3MMN off of Well Road in the heart of Swords, Ireland. Just down the street across from Lord Mayor’s Well Bar and Grill.

References:

  • Waymarking.com unknown St. Colmcille’s Well, Swords. Website referenced 12/23/15 at http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM3MMN_St_Colmcilles_Well_Swords
  • Swords-dublin.com unknown St. Colmcille’s Well. Website referenced 12/23/15 at http://www.swords-dublin.com/st-colmcilles-well.html

Sord Chomcille Well - St. Colmcille Well - holy well by bar/grill http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24179; 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Sord Chomcille Well – St. Colmcille Well – holy well by bar/grill
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24179; 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Sord Chomcille Well - St. Colmcille Well - holy well by bar/grill http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24179; 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Sord Chomcille Well – St...

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St. Werburgh’s Well (Swords, Ireland)

St Werburth's Well (Swords/Dublin, Ireland)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24191. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St Werburth's Well (Swords/Dublin, Ireland) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24191. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St Werburth’s Well (Swords/Dublin, Ireland)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24191. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St Werburth’s Well
Finlay/Swords/Dublin, Ireland
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24191

A well found just down the slope from the Kellogg company in Finlay/Swords area of Dublin county. Just besides the Airside retail park in the holy well section. Believed to be a relatively newer designated holy well, it has a Facebook fan page and is named after St. Werburth, a Saxon princess who ruled in these parts during 689 C.E. Clootie trees, rag trees, offerings, statues, trinkets, and a visitor pouch welcome visitors who walk past a professional carved stone and archway down to the little springs.

Saint Werburth, Werburh, Waerburh, Werburga, or Werburgh was an Anglo-Saxon princess who became known throughout England as a Saint, and later became the Patron Saint of Chester. Her date of celebration and feast is each February 3rd, just after St. Brigid. She was stated to have been born in Stone (Staffordshire, England) to King Wulfhere of Mercia (Christian son of the Pagan King Penda of Mercia)and Queen Saint Ermenilda (daughter of the King of Kent). Her great aunt Etheldreda (former queen of North Umbria) founded the Abbey of Ely which Werburgh was all too anxious to join, and with her father’s consent, began her dedications as a nun. She at first was trained in her home by Saint Chad (Bishop of Lichfield) and her mother, later in the cloister by her aunt and grandmother. A Benedictine nun, Patroness of Chester, Abbess of Weedon, Trentham, Hanbury, Minster in Sheppey, and Ely. As a member of the Mercian household, she had relatives in the French, Kentish, and East Anglian Royal families. Even though she was born a princess with royal blood, she cared not for the easy life that came with royalty, otherwise dedicating her life to only do good and make others happy, growing good and wise herself. She spent some of her residence in Weedon Bec, Northamptonshire and began the tedious task of reforming the convents throughout England. She took over the Abbey of Ely as the 4th Abbess of Ely. She died on February 3, 700 C.E and buried in the Hanbury cemetery, Staffordshire, then her remains were transferred to Chester to the Chester Cathedral where she was patroness once declared a Saint.

Werburgh was known for her miracle of bringing a dead goose back to life. She was also known to have banished all the geese from the village of Weedon Bec, Northamptonshire and that to this day no geese will every enter into the village. In this village, at the church of St. Peter and St. Paul, are stained glass windows depicting the story and legend. By 708 C.E. her brother Cenred succeeded as King of Mercia and decided to move her remains to the Church at Hanbury where her body was found to be miraculously intact and decreed a sign of divine favor, her tomb becoming an object of veneration and a center for pilgrimage. Cenred was so impressed by this, he abdicated and entered the holy orders as well. Her shrine remained in Hanbury until 875 C.E. but was relocated again back to the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul protected by the city walls of Chester in fear of Viking raiders taking her remains. Chester at this point became headquarters for the cult of Werburgh. The church was renamed and re-dedicated to St. Werburgh and St. Oswald around 975 C.E. A monastery was also built here dedicated to both of these saints. Those who had pilgrimage to her shrine were often granted the badge of a basket of geese. By 1057 C.E. the church was rebuilt, endowed by the Earl of Mercia – Leofric and St. Werburgh was regarded as Patron Saint and protector of Chester when the miraculous withdrawal of Welsh king Gruffudd ap Llywelyn occurred after the siege of the city. Her popularity remained throughout the Norman Conquest. “Hugh the Wolf” (Norman Earl of Chester – Hugh d’Avranches) in 1093 C.E. endowed the church and abbey establishing a Benedictine monastery with monks from Bec Abbey of Normandy providing the first two post-Conquest Archbishops of Canterbury – Anselm and Lanfranc. He also entered the monastery shortly before his death and buried within. An elaborate shrine was built for St. Werburgh in the 14th century, but saw demise and destruction during the reign of Henry VIII. The Abbey was dissolved, shrine broken up, and the remains of St. Werburgh scattered. By 1540 C.E. focus on St. Werburgh was gone, and the abbey became Chester Cathedral re-dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Her shrine was reconstructed in 1876 C.E. and are on display at the Lady Chapel of the cathedral.

The Legend of St. Werburgh

A Mercian princess who converted over at an early age to become a Benedictine nun, through her life became the Patroness of Chester, Abbess of Weedon, Trentham, Hanbury, Minster in Sheppey, and Ely. Even though she was born a princess with royal blood, she cared not for the easy life that came with royalty, otherwise dedicating her life to only do good and make others happy, growing good and wise herself. Although her life fluctuated in various positions and titles in her religious orders, she never changed her humility that had always characterized her and in her devotion to all those in her care that she was more servant to the people than mistress. All felt God had rewarded her for her childlike trust by many miracles making her one of the best known and loved of the Saxon Saints.

Villagers and animals alike were said to have come to St. Werburgh to be healed or given advice. She was rumored to have a magical connection with all animals as well, being able to communicate with them just as she could with humans. St. Werburgh became quite taken by a flock of geese that frequented the convent meadows and swam in the pond. There was one goose that became her favorite that she had named Gray king, he had a black ring around his neck and was quite fat, seemingly the happiest within the flock. Unfortunately, Gray King and his flock would often get into the cornfields, infuriating Hugh, the convent steward. Hugh asked Werburgh to handle this trouble. Werburgh called forth the geese and told Gray King how bad it was to steal the corn and spoil the harvest and left them with simply a scolding, a shake, and a light whipping. She ended the scolding with kissing Gray King before imprisoning them in a pen overnight with intent to gift them convent porridge the next morn before their release. This infuriated Hugh and he felt she didn’t do what he expected to punish them harshly is what they deserved. He hated birds except to feast on. Werburgh told Hugh to serve the geese porridge in the morning before releasing them. He was shocked of this task. A plump goose as his reward, Hugh ate Gray King as a meal to make up for the lost corn. Werburgh was furious when she learned of this and commanded Hugh to bring her the bones. She punished Hugh to dedicate his life’s study to animals and how to care for them, and forbid him to ever eat of bird or beast again, confining him for two nights in the pen where the geese were imprisoned. She took the bones of Gray king and ordered him to rise back to life. She then commanded the flock of geese to leave Weedon, never to return, to which day it is believed that a goose has never entered the village since.

Because of her miracles, her corpse was coveted by many. St. Werburgh instructed that her remains stay in Hanbury, but the nuns of Trentham refused to release them until those of Hanbury took her body to the tomb there – and in 708 C.E. her remains were exhumed when she was declared a Saint, in the presence of King Coelred of Mercia and his council. Her second miracle, was that her body was found to be incorrupt and in the exact state it was when she was laid to rest. 875 C.E. she was moved to the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul in Chester, which was renamed and rededicated to her, into a shrine of her honor, where she rests reconstructed today (after being destroyed by Henry VIII). During Henry VIII most of the Cathedrals were ransacked and relics scattered, although St. Werburgh’s were eventually returned. Most of the figures in the Cathedral were mutilated. The female heads were accidentally placed on male shoulders, and vice versa by the workmen attempting to reconstruct them, and only 30 original figures remain. Today there is a statue of Saint Werburgh with a goose by her side at the Our Lady and St. Werburgh’s Church.

    References:
  • Bridgett, Ronald W. 1985 The Life of St. Werburgh: Princess of Mercia.
  • Brown, Abbie Farwell 2004 The Book of Saints and Friendly Beasts.
  • Our Lady and St. Werburgh 2003 The Legend of St. Werburgh. Websited referenced 12/23/15 at http://www.ourladyandstwerburgh.co.uk/the-legend-of-st-werburgh.html
  • Robert Appleton Co. 1912 The Catholic Encylopaedia, Vol. XV.
  • Seomraranga.com n.d. “Holy Wells of Ireland”. Website referenced 12/25/15 at http://www.holywell.seomraranga.com/holywellsireland.htm
  • Wikipedia n.d. “St. Werburgh”. Website referenced 12/26/15 at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Werburgh.
  • Youtube n.d. “St. Werburgh’s Well, Swords, Dublin”. Website refrenced 12/25/15 at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gdqude7t14M.

St Werburth's Well (Swords/Dublin, Ireland) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24191. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St Werburth’s Well (Swords/Dublin, Ireland)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24191. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St Werburth's Well (Swords/Dublin, Ireland) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24191. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St Werburth’s Well (Swords/Dublin, Irelan...

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The Highfield Holy Well (near Swords, Ireland)

Highfield Well by Highfield House
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24165. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Highfield Well by Highfield House http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24165. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Highfield Well by Highfield House

Our Lady’s Well / Highfield Well by Highfield House B&B
Forest Road, Dublin/Feltrim/Fingal/Swords, Ireland
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24165

As common a name as many across the Irish landscape of “Our Lady’s Well” or simply “Holy Well”, a term given to most holy wells during their Christianization and dedication to the Virgin Mary before being assigned to a given Saint, this holy well is no different. In addition, as with many holy wells, it is no longer extant as a well demolished by means of residential construction. Water sources flow still from the area, but not from the well itself. It was originally recorded in 1755 and rebuilt in 1757. The pump was removed around 1895. It was noted by Nichols of Leicestershire in 1811 as “On the road to Lutterworth, within a few yards of Hinckley Town, is a spring called The Holy Well, originally dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and once known by the name of Our Lady’s Well, the water of which is exquisitely clear and good”. The area was dotted with numerous wells, most of which are no longer extant. These were Cogg’s Well, Christopher Stevenson’s Spa, the Priest Hills, Feltrim Hill (dried up due to quarrying), and St. Werburth’s Well. This Holy Well was dried up by digging for gravel, apparently another well opened up across the road over which in 1757 was placed a neat brick pillar inscribed “Rebuilt 1757”. Now all stands is a residential community and a Bed & Breakfast. A small bridge and stream exist below seepage fed by remnants of wells/springs in the area.

Location: SP433940. Near Forest Road, Fingal / Dublin County, near Swords, Ireland. Close by the Highfield House B&B.

Highfield Well by Highfield House http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24165. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Highfield Well by Highfield House
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24165. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Highfield Well by Highfield House http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24165. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Highfield Well by Highfiel...

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Feltrim Hill and Well

Feltrim Hill Quarry and Well (by roadstone retail center) - 
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=241614. January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Feltrim Hill Quarry and Well (by roadstone retail center) -  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=241614. January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Feltrim Hill Quarry and Well (by roadstone retail center)

Feltrim Hill Quarry and Well
(by roadstone retail center) Fingal, Ireland

http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24161

There once was a historic village named Feltrim at the base of the ancient monumental hill known as Feltrim Hill. Here there was also a sacred spring turned holy well that once held legends and lore of its own. These all no longer exist as half of the hill is gone, quarrying destroying much of its heritage. This was the stomping grounds of King James, the Earl of Desmond, A hill that Samuel Beckett climbed and wrote of its beauty, and St. Werburgh, the Saxon princess who ruled these parts in 689 C.E. It was here that there was a well dedicated to her. A hill of limestone that most likely was a passage grave, it was chiseled away since the 1880s. A historic limekiln still stands. Remnants of the Feltrim windmill exist. But that is all that exists of ancient Feltrim. At the base of the hill once stood a line of 14 beech trees guiding pilgrims to the holy well to attend mass. The quarry grounds are fenced in and access to spots where the well is believed to exist are not available. While the well is believed to have been destroyed, the water source still appears on aerial maps. Another well dedicated to St. Werburgh is located down the road.

One of the more popular families settling Fingal and Feltrim were the Fagans. The Fagans had dwelt atop Feltrim hill. Also here was the chapel of Kinsaly. The Feltrim windmill also sits atop the hill. It was here that the Earl of Desmond, during the reign of Elizabeth, had been permitted to be transferred from Dublin castle so he could get some well-needed country air, in the custody of Christopher Fagan. Because of this kindness, the Earl took advantage of a custodial walk with Christopher to enact his escape to Munster allowing him to begin the infamous rebellion and met his demise being murdered by some of his own followers. The Fagans also housed James the Second during his flight from the Boyne.

In 1947 an archaeological excavation was conducted atop Feltrim Hill uncovering over 500 artifacts including Roman coins, tinned bronze mount (4th century C.E.).

Feltrim Castle
Was built in 1429 and was known as the “Ten Pound Castle” being the residence of the Fagan family. It measured approximately 38 feet in diameter. It was from this castle where Gerald, the Earl of Desmond, in 1574 was permitted to escape while under custody of Christopher Fagan. In 1690, King James fled from the Battle of the Boyne and stayed with Richard Fagan in this castle. During the 1700’s the Fagan family experienced an eclipse and the Castle was demolished by the mid-18th century. The Well still stood.

Fagan’s Well and the old Hag
The well is believed to still stand here at Feltrim Hill, and various accounts state it being either in really good preservation or poor preservation. It is not publically accessible and is securely fenced within the private domain of Feltrim Quarry. It can however been seen still active within aerial photographs. Away from the Hill is also the Well of St. Werburgh, Crow’s Castle, and the Hanging Tree where executions took place during Penal times. A good amount of ghost stories and lore surround the well and hanging tree with accounts of ghostly apparitions appearing near them evenings. Stories can be found about the grey ghostly horse that rides to the top of Feltrim Hill, the big black dog with blazing eyes and the old hag carrying her bundle of faggots always in direction of the Holy Well.

The Windmill
Atop Feltrim Hill is still the remains of the picturesque windmill most famous piece of history in the area. This tower windmill was built in 1668 by Dutch craftsmen with the finest of bricks from Holland. It was originally a woolen mill, transforming to a corn mill in the 1700’s. Around 1800 it was used as a semaphore mill transmitting messages from Dublin to the next hill tower all the way to Belfast. By 1839 the sails of the windmill blew off. In 1973 the Mill stood next to the windmill as a local landmark until it was torn down that same year on October 23 and demolished. It was one of the most upsetting historic tragedies in Fingal’s history. All that remains is part of its interior.

References:

Feltrim Hill Quarry and Well (by roadstone retail center) -  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=241614. January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Feltrim Hill Quarry and Well (by roadstone retail center) –
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=241614. January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Feltrim Hill Quarry and Well (by roadstone retail center) -  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=241614. January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

Feltrim Hill Quarry an...

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St. Doulagh’s Well (Fingal/Swords, Ireland)

St. Doulagh's Well and Church: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24157. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St. Doulagh's Well and Church: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24157. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St. Doulagh’s Well and Church: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24157. 4 January 2014.

St. Doulagh’s Church and WellFingal, Ireland

http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24157

A brilliant fortified well that is attached to a chapel is St. Doulagh’s well in north Dublin County in Fingal near Malahide and Swords. Originally a Pagan spring/well named Bethesda’s sacred pool, this was yet another glorified takeover by Christianity of Pagan sites and named after Saint Doulagh. A monastic settlement, hermit cells, and a later medieval church were built up by this spring and the fortification of an octagonal stone well house known as the “baptistery” and pool encasing the spring was said to be dedicated to Saint Doulagh.

Saint Doulagh or Naomh Dúileach was also known as “Episcopus et Confessor” (a bishop and confessor) who lived around 600 C.E. as an anchorite (hermit) dedicated to Christ in study, solitude, and mission. Like most anchorites, he had very little contact with the outside world. Very little about him remains, and no account of his life exists. There exists some belief that St. Doulagh was actually Olave, a 10th century Viking God. Modern historians debunk this today as there is amble evidence that St. Doulagh was an actual person living physically at this settlement.

His patronal day or festival has been attributed to November 17th. Saint Doulagh, like most anchorites, were more popular in the East such as Egypt and Syria, though could be found in Ireland although absent in England. They were iconic of the Older Church history of Ireland, distinguishing Irish Church operations from most of the other Churches of Western Europe, giving more adaptation from Oriental Christianity. Because of this, Ireland celebrated Easter at the same time as the Eastern Church rather than that recognized by the Western Church. Whenever you find an Irish place name containing the word “desert” it signifies a solitary place where an anchorite once lived. It is believed that Saint Doulagh lived in this area and during the 7th century C.E. established a monastic settlement on these grounds. Where the church now stands, is believed to have been the location of a small cell in which he lived as a hermit cut off from the rest of the world. A fresco once existed within the medieval church depicting St. Doulagh and other Saints as anchorites here. It was several centuries after his death that a medieval church was built on this spot in his dedication.

The Church and Cross: Clochar Dúiligh or St. Doulagh’s Church is located in Fingal, Ireland near Malahide, Portmarnock, and Swords. A Latin style granite cross with a splayed base possessing a Patee or Maltese design greets those entering the sanctuary. The local stone of the area was limestone, so granite was seen as an imported building material to the area suggesting a pre-1300 C.E. date for the stone. This stone is believed to have been part of the original hermitage. Because Vikings had settled this area as early as the 8th century C.E. there are potential links of this monastic settlement with Vikings. Rumors existed that this settlement was originally Viking, but the architectural Irish construction methods of the Church oppose this. Some date the monastic settlement to the 5th century C.E. during the legendary time of St. Patrick. By 1038 C.E. the site was given to the Prior of the Holy Trinity or Christ Church Cathedral of Dublin. Before the current structures, a medieval hermitage and church was built here during the 12th century hosting the anchorite’s cell now directly under the Prior’s Chamber and connected by a spiral staircase. The Hermit’s Cell measured 10’ x 7.5’. Above this is where the monks were believed to have lived whereas the original building construct separated this area between a dormitory and a refectory. This original building would have measured approximately 48’ x 18’ with 3’ thick walls and a double roof of rough stones set in cement. A battlemented square tower was added during the 15th century. There were numerous frescoes added to the baptistery in 1609 funded by Peter Fagan, brother of John Fagan of Feltrim, representing the descent of the Holy Ghost on the apostles, St. Patrick, St. Bridget, St. Columcille, and St. Doulagh dressed as an anchorite. Unfortunately these were defaced by Sir Richard Bulkeley of Dunlavin after the Battle of the Boyne with no trace remaining of their existence according to the Church guide. The medieval church was placed within a small monastic settlement founded by Saint Doulagh during the early 7th century C.E. There are rumors that this original monastery and church was linked to Grange Abbey and the Grange house of Baldoyle through an underground passage.

The church itself however was built in 1864. Funded by Lord Talbot de Malahide and public subscription, the church was presided over by Reverend W.S. Kennedy, M.A. as Rector of the Parish. It was consecrated by Archbishop Trench during the Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul in 1865. The church is the oldest stone-roofed church still in use in Ireland. There are other stone roofed churches in Ireland such as St. Kevin’s in Glendalough and Cormac’s Chapel in Cashel. The Church has seven rooms including a leper’s window where lepers could view mass, receive Holy Communion; and a penitential cell where incumbents were imprisoned. One room is the reputed tomb of St. Doulagh. The larger room is the former main place of worship. From 1974 onwards, the Church has been used by the Roman Catholic Church parishioners of Donaghmede, Clongriffin, and Balgriffin. The baptistery and complex was cleaned and restored in 1991 by state funding. Outside of the Church is located St. Doulagh’s Well and St. Catherine’s Pond.

The Pagan spring: Very little is known about the original spring before the Christian build-up of the baptistery. It originally supplied the monastery with water. There is reference that it was originally called Bethesda’s sacred pool. The sacred pool of Bethsaida or Bethesda is world renown where the multitude of the sick, blind, lame, and withered lay in its five porches waiting for the moving of the waters to heal them. The angel of the Lord descends at certain times into the pond and water is moved, and he that wend down first into the pond was made whole in this healing fountain. The original site is in Jerusalem.

The Christian Well: This holy well was often used for baptisms by the Church and often termed as a “baptistery”. Its fortified construct is a notable one in Irish architecture as it is the only extant detached baptistery in all of Ireland. It is of octagonal construct and once held the frescoes depicting St. Bridget, St. Chomcille, and St. Doulagh above within the upper section of the ceiling and walls. Near the frescoes was once a large marble plaque bearing the inscription: “Bethesda’s sacred pool, let others tell, with healing virtues, let her waters swell. An equal glory shall Fingallia clai, not be less grateful for her blissful stream. Thy prayers, Doulachus, mounted up to He’ven, thence to thy will the mighty power be given, to drive the fiery fever away. Strength to replace and rescue from decay, in every malady a life to stay. The cherub, wondrous, moves his wat’ry sphere. The Saint beholds who stirs the fountain here. Hail, lovely fount! If long unsung thy name, it thence shall rise above the starry frame.” The well today is often dry, potentially caused by the construction of the road nearby. The well drains into the St. Catherine’s pool.

St. Catherine’s Pond: An open-aired pool with stone seating located adjacent to the octagonal baptistery / holy well. The curative waters from the well flowed into this pool where many could benefit from soaking in its waters. Pilgrimages and patterns were practiced here for many centuries until the rioting began and the patterns were suppressed by clergy during the 19th century.

Directions: 10 km from Dublin north in the hamlet of Balgriffin. From Dublin take Highway R105 to Howth, after 1 km turn left on Malahide Road (R107) for 7 km until you see St. Doulagh’s Church on the left. There is minimal parking, although across the road has space for a few cars. The church is open for tours Sunday afternoons during the summer. Discovery Map: 50. 0 212 422.

St. Doulagh's Well and Church: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24157. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St. Doulagh’s Well and Church: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24157. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St. Doulagh's Well and Church: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24157. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.

St...

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St. Sylvester’s Well (Malahide, Ireland)

St. Sylvester's Well: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24153. January 3, 2014 - Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

St. Sylvester's Well: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24153. January 3, 2014 - Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

St. Sylvester’s Well: Malahide, Ireland

St. Sylvester’s Well
Old Street (Chapel Street), Malahide, Ireland
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24153
http://www.malahideheritage.com/#!sylvesters-well/cidb

http://malahideparish.ie/blog/the-history-of-st-sylvesters/

In the heart of Malahide sprung forth a natural spring that provided water for residents in this area since prehistoric times. By historic era, it was well protected and revered also as a holy well in addition to being the source of sustenance for the fisherman village. This well is found along the old Main Street in Malahide, which was later called Chapel Street, then Old Street. The well site consists of a beautifully fortified stone well house containing the legendary St. Sylvester’s Well. Where Old Street meets Strand Street was originally designated the town Centre and stood primarily as a town inhabited by fishermen. By 1830 all of the buildings along this street were probably mud brick with thatched roofs seeing changes by 1901 and by the 1950’s no thatched cottages remained. These cottages were serviced originally by this natural spring located now on the corner of Old Street and Railway Avenue (formerly Fountain Lane). The first reference to the well on paper was a map by John Rocque of the area in 1756, indicating a well, but no name or title for it. The well at this time had an opening at the top enabling residents to pull out water via the traditional method of rope and bucket to retrieve it. It was the village’s source of water until 1929 when water mains brought running water to Malahide. The well has since 1929 been covered under the guise that is was considered a danger to children. The well was later named after the adjoining Church of St. Sylvester. The actual name of the well and its dedication has been disputed for years. Some historians claim the well got its title from the Pagan Sun-God Silvanus while others claimed it to be named after the Pope St. Sylvester (c. 270 – 335 C.E.) who was Bishop of Rome in 313 C.E. St. Sylvester was visited by Constantine the Great (c. 280-337 C.E.) suffering from leprosy and having a dream in which St. Peter and St. Paul advised him to visit St. Sylvester who restored him to full health. Prior to this act, Constantine was a extreme adherent to Judaism. St. Sylvester questioned his faith and suggested that he should be disputed by a collective audience of Jews and Christians for the topics of discussion including Paganism, God, Christ and the 10 Commandments. Zamberi, a leading Rabbi volunteered to perform the miracle of healing as proof of his faith, approached an ox to whom he whispered the name “Jehovah” into the animal’s ear upon which the beast dropped dead. St. Sylvester retaliated by whispering the name “Christ” into the animal’s ear and the ox came back to life. St. Sylvester also apparently slayed a dragon (probably a crocodile) using the name of Christ to convince Constantine. Impressed by this act, Constantine issued the Edict of Milen proclaiming total freedom of religion for all and was open to St. Sylvester’s healing of him. In Tivoli, at the Church of San Silvestro, is a 13th century wall painting depicting Constantine’s conversion over to Christianity. The feast of St. Sylvester takes place every December 31th, leading pilgrims to this well in his honor. During occupation of the area by the Normans, some scholars believe that it was the Normans who dedicated the well to St. Sylvester since they were very proud of their French origins, and the first French Pope Sylvester 11 would have been in lead when they arrived here at the end of the 12th century. Yet other scholars believe the well was named after Bishop Silvester, a 5th century holy man who was sent to deliver the Irish Pagans to Christianity.

The well has also been called “Sunday Well” by locals because the water was believed to have first manifested on a Sunday or potentially after one of Malahide’s first residents “Fir Domhnainn whose name was similar to the Irish name “Dia Domhnaigh” meaning “Sunday”. The well has also been called “Our Lady’s Well”. During this association, the well was seen to be associated with the Blessed Virgin Mary with pilgrimages occurring every August 15th doing patterns around the well. Reportedly the well was decorated at this time and the statue of the Blessed Virgin was adorned by ribbons. It is believed that this statue of the Lady, no longer extant, was “Our Lady of Malahide” and associated with the Oak panel carving of the Assumption in Malahide Castle. The patterns involved circling seven times while reciting the ran or special prayer. There was an absence of this August 15th practice for some time only until recently being revived. Baptisms took place at this well also through the ages involving a triple immersion. Todays baptismal frequently have 8 sides because 8 is seen as the number of re-birth and is why many holy wells are octagonal shaped. Wells along the coast have also been associated with eels and sacred fish, such as the eel in Malahide. In 1890 an eel was inserted into the waters of this well to purify it. Eels were believed to not be able to die before sunset, eel skins would make lucky belts for their wearer, horse hairs could turn into eels with the right magic, and the belief that Eel juice or soup would cure stomach cancer. Because of this, eels were often released into a holy well to swim in its waters and would therefore keep the water pure as the eel would eat all the mites, crustaceans, flies, nympha, and aquatic insects that would sour a well. The well since pre-Christian times was reputed for curing various illnesses and diseases since it water’s had medicinal properties. Wells are also reputedly attracted to by spirits often sites of hauntings. Sometimes these haunts are propitious, if remembered, though vindictive if neglected. So holy wells like St. Sylvester’s are to be approached from the northern side, moving east to west, in imitation of the diurnal motion of the sun to prevent harm from spirits. Once this well was taken over by Christianity, the Pagan customs were adopted and adapted into the established Christian beliefs around wells.

St. Sylvester’s Church adjacent to the well was constructed in 1846 as a national school for boys and girls, converting to a boy’s school by 1954. It was then taken over by parishioners as a house of worship. This however was not the first Catholic Church in Malahide, nor the first church in the area dedicated to St. Sylvester. It was believed to have been erected during the darkest years of the Great Famine, but the latest in a series of churches raised by Malahide residents to the Glory of God. Many believe however that the well was first named after St. Sylvester and these churches took their names from this well. During Protestant occupation and conversions, and when celebration of mass was forbidden, the Abbey in the area ceased to be a place of worship and fell into ruin since there were no Protestants in Malahide at this time. The leading family, the Talbots, however defied the law and turned their home into a mass house as many Catholics at this time believed the ban of mass was only temporary and would eventually be lifted. The castle was utilized as a clandestine mass house until 1731 when Catholics came to the realization the government was powerless in the enforcement of the ban. A simple thatched chapel was built south of the well on a site donated by Richard Talbot, it was consecrated to St. Sylvester, and eventually built-up by 1841 into a short, broad nave with four extensions – one of which was used as a sacristy and schoolroom, another as a porch opening to Old street. Through the years the church and building was built up erasing this pattern, of which only a footprint exists beneath the spire – the front carriageway and eastern-side passage. The churches current foundation stone was designated in May 1845 by Archbishop Murray during the Great Famine.

St. Sylvester's Well: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24153. January 3, 2014 - Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

St. Sylvester’s Well: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24153. January 3, 2014 – Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

St. Sylvester's Well: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24153. January 3, 2014 - Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/.

St...

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Portmarnock Spring (St. Marnock’s Well) – Portmarnock, Ireland

January 3, 2014 - Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. St. Marnock's Spring (Portmarnock, Ireland)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24147

Oceanside Spring: January 3, 2014 - Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. St. Marnock's Spring (Portmarnock, Ireland) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24147

Oceanside Spring: January 3, 2014 – Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143.

Portmarnock Spring / St. Marnock’s Spring
Portmarnock Beach, Portmarnock, Ireland
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24147
http://www.portmarnockwaves.com/St.%20Marnock’s_Well.html
https://portmarnock.wordpress.com/old/ Portmarnock

There is most likely two different holy wells / springs dedicated to St. Marnock in Portmarnock. It was very difficult finding either – the Dublin Well book referred to one below the lighthouse which is pictured here and the other is referred to as being within the graveyard. The well itself was first mentioned by J. Shearman in 1868 and thoroughly discussed by Macalister in 1945. These two springs are described quite differently. When referring to the Spring, the location is the beach, when referring to the well, the location is the graveyard. Reputation of the well is described primarily by it being located next to a magnificent Ogham stone with a key-hole shaped opening in the sinister side of a drawing by Reverend J. Shearman of the stone and well labelled “St. Marnock’s fingers” and references to the old cemetery.

Macalister wrote that the “stone’s existence has been known since about the middle of the last century. The only record of it is a very rough sketch by Rev. J. Shearman … in a note upon the sketch are the words in Shearman’s Handwriting – Fragments of an Ogham stone, formerly standing beside St. Marnock’s well, near Malahide, Co. Dublin dated June 8th, 1868 … the stone was broken up some time after the above date and the fragments dispersed apparently for building material” (Geology: Macalister/1945 20-21). During a Fingal County Council meeting restoration of St. Marnock’s Cemetery and Well was proposed by Councilor P. Coyle and D. O’Brien that the old St. Marnock’s Cemetery adjacent to Strand Road in Portmarnock and the well be examined by an archaeologist whom will recommend restoration / maintenance needs under the Heritage/Conservation Programme. The site was visited in March 2006 during the banking of sand on the golf course close to the cemetery walls as well as assessing the current state of St. Marnock’s well, with the end result that the Conservation Research Officer was unable to determine the exact location of St. Marnock’s Well with no visibility found above ground leading to a inability to assess the current state. Rumor was that a local landowner destroyed the well in the middle of the 19th century since the graveyard was under private ownership even though the graveyard and well are both Protected Structures and Recorded Monuments. The historic description of the well indicates a large circular pool with sixteen steps leading down to it with an old willow tree bent over it. The known directions of the well is heading in the direction of Portmarnock village, just after the Portmarnock Hotel, just past the Artworks Café, to the next bus stop, on the left hand side of the wall is a gate into a field with a footpath leading directly t

o the old graveyard. The well is supposed to be near the church where locals would visit and celebrate “Patron’s Day” every August and make rounds of the well. Pilgrimages stopped when the property owner Mr. Jameson diverted the water to the cattle pond and filled the Holy Well in.

The Druid Well/Spring – References to the Well and Spring, with different location being attributed and used by local Druids for healing. It is believed that the St. Patrick influenced missionary St. Marnock took over these wells / springs claiming them for his own fame and trying to demolish the Pagan traditions/beliefs behind them as is the case with many of the holy wells and springs throughout the world covered over by Christianity. Apparently St. Marnock was well known in Scotland being from Kilmarnock in having converted the local Celts from worshipping water, trees, and wells to Christianity. He apparently did blessings over the Druid Well converting it to a “Holy Well”. There is ample evidence of use in this area dating back to Neolithic times including discovery of flints and other tools excavated nearby and the remains of a ring fort can be seen from aerial photography south of town.

Oceanside Spring: January 3, 2014 - Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. St. Marnock's Spring (Portmarnock, Ireland) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24147

Oceanside Spring: January 3, 2014 – Portmarnock, Ireland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24143. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Eadaoin Bineid, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. St. Marnock’s Spring (Portmarnock, Ireland)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24147

While searching for the well we stum...

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The Sacramento River Headwaters

The Sacred Headwaters of the Shasta River: (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=2219) 8/10/15: Return journey from 2nd Star back to Riverside: I-5 south.  Life in Southern California 2015 series. Photos copyright 2015 all rights reserved: Technogypsie Productions, www.technogypsie.com/photography - photos by Leaf McGowan, Tom Baurley, Etain De Danann, Eadaoin Bineid Baurley. To follow the travel tales visit www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ and www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ or directly: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15485.
The Sacred Headwaters of the Shasta River: (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=2219) 8/10/15: Return journey from 2nd Star back to Riverside: I-5 south.  Life in Southern California 2015 series. Photos copyright 2015 all rights reserved: Technogypsie Productions, www.technogypsie.com/photography - photos by Leaf McGowan, Tom Baurley, Etain De Danann, Eadaoin Bineid Baurley. To follow the travel tales visit www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ and www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ or directly: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15485.

The Sacred Headwaters of the Shasta River: (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=2219) 8/10/15: Return journey from 2nd Star back to Riverside: I-5 south. Life in Southern California 2015 series. Photos copyright 2015 all rights reserved: Technogypsie Productions, www.technogypsie.com/photography – photos by Leaf McGowan, Tom Baurley, Etain De Danann, Eadaoin Bineid Baurley. To follow the travel tales visit www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ and www.technogypsie...

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