MATH Marine Anthropology Modules

Nov 19
The Posts on this page are the summaries for the courses developed by Marine Archaeologist Yvonne-Cher Skye while living aboard the Mary and Bill of Rights in Chula Vista, California, U.S.A.. It consists of 21 aspects of Marine Anthropology which can be taught in a seminar single-day format or over an 18-week semester. The supplemental materials will be available for purchase via paypal or credit card on her webpage located at the YGFI- Your Girl Friday International Website.  Links to individual modules and their introductions will be posted on this page, as well as on the Skye Research Page on YGFI's website. To gain a better understanding of the courses that are offered, please read the introduction page here. Follow the links to the other posts which will provide links to the specific page on the website to purchase that module.  At the present time, they are provided as an entire package, which includes:
  • Course Outline
  • Glossary
  • Module
  • Notes
  • References available
  • Websites
  • Summary of course to promote to students and the public
  • Handouts
  • Video list of related topics
As well as each document is available for single purchase. The purpose of these modules is to provide an unique educational opportunity which does not require formal educational training to conduct the course.  The idea of providing so many supplemental materials is to ensure satisfaction of the attendees of the course, as well as the boards or governing bodies of any organization that chooses to add these courses to their existing programs.  As stated in the introduction module this is only the skeleton of the courses, and it can stand alone as an introductory course, further more advanced courses will be developed in the future. Ms. Skye has also developed modules for Climatology, Marine Science, and soon to be announced. MATH 001 In the Beginning - Summary MATH 002 Fabled Lands - Summary MATH 003 Legendary Voyages - Summary MATH 004 Sea Quests, Famous Expeditions and Explorers - Summary MATH 005 Maritime History - Summary MATH 006 Nautical Custom - Summary MATH 007 Life at Sea - Summary MATH 008 Famous Captains - Summary MATH 009 Mutinies - Summary MATH 010 Big Ships - Summary MATH 011 Death and Disaster - Summary MATH 012 Navigable Waters - Summary MATH 013 Castaways and Survivors - Summary MATH 014 Criminals - Summary MATH 015 Myths - Summary MATH 016 Mysteries - Summary MATH 017 Monsters - Summary MATH 018 Wraiths of the Sea - Summary MATH 019 Superstitions and Beliefs - Summary MATH 020 Famous Ships - Summary MATH 021 Battles - Summary

Human Traffickers: The Modern Day Barbary Pirates – Yahoo! News

Jun 24
Posted by lfpl Filed in Cultural Issues, Defense

COMMENTARY | This week the 2012 Trafficking in Persons Report revealed there were an estimated 27 million victims forced into human trafficking. It also revealed there are 17 countries doing nothing to comply with international standards to stop the practice.

Eleven are from the same neighborhood as a historical ancestor to the modern-day human traffickers: the Barbary Pirates. This group from North Africa and the Middle East raided Europe and other regions for centuries with impunity, and no one did anything about it until the U.S. came along.

The question is whether the U.S. is again willing to do something about a human trafficking problem that others seem unable or unwilling to tackle.

For hundreds of years, Barbary Pirates seemed to go wherever they pleased. There are even reports of these pirates snagging travelers sailing between Ireland and England. All were forced into the type of slavery that might have exceeded the Hollywood horrors shown on the big screen. Rowers chained to oars until death, harems, bastinados, drudgery or prison. Only a lucky few were ever ransomed or managed to escape. An estimated 850,000 might have fallen to this fate.

This persisted until the U.S. got into the commercial game, trading throughout the Mediterranean Sea. Morocco, Algeria, Tunis and Tripoli pounced, unleashing the human trafficking problem upon a new country, well-documented by Ian W. Toll's book "Six Frigates."

Americans were advised by Europeans to pay tribute to the Barbary Pirates, a bribe which would hopefully lead to fewer attacks. But a cash-strapped American government couldn't pay up. And these Barbary Pirates demanded the U.S. make them ships to include in the ransom payments for American kidnapped sailors. The Pasha declared war on the U.S. in 1801.

President Thomas Jefferson finally ordered the American Naval Squadron (built by John Adams, which Jefferson opposed creating) to deal with the Barbary Pirates. Initially, it was a disaster. America captured little and lost its frigate (the USS Philadelphia) and all aboard when it ran aground off of Tripoli. Now the pirates had more captives and a powerful ship.

But a daring raid by Lt. Stephen Decatur aboard a disguised Maltese merchantman destroyed the USS Philadelphia. America kept up a blockade in the harbor, and shelled the city. Marines were landed with the goal of installing an ex-Pasha, who would be more amenable to American interests.

The blockade didn't work. The Marines didn't overthrow Tripoli. But Tripoli did sign an agreementpromising not to capture more American ships. And when the Algerians made the mistake of declaring war on the U.S. after the War of 1812, they too were forced to cave in after several naval setbacks.

America did not overwhelm the Barbary Pirates but did earn some grudging respect by standing up to them. And that's what they need to do with human trafficking. Some large military demonstration of force won't achieve much, but perhaps some highly publicized law enforcement raids might do the trick.

Because after the Americans stood up to the Barbary Pirates, other Europeans followed. Within two decades of their wars with the Americans, these countries were conquered and became colonies themselves.

If Europeans see how serious Americans are about the problem, they're more likely to do their part. Maybe like the Barbary Pirates, the human trafficker scourge can finally be brought under, after America proved you can stop a problem that seemed to persist forever.

High-powered cannon sinks tsunami ‘ghost ship’

Apr 7
Posted by lfpl Filed in Cultural Issues, Defense, Life on the Sea
Cross-posted via Word Press "Press This" from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-17635726 
6 April 2012 Last updated at 04:31 GMTHelp
The US Coast Guard has used cannon to sink a crewless Japanese ship that drifted to Alaska after the 2011 tsunami. Petty Officer David Mosley said that the weapon was used to puncture holes in the vessel to take on water. The boat had no lights or power and was viewed as a danger to other ships.

Chinese freighter hijacked by pirates off Iran: Xinhua

Apr 7
Posted by lfpl Filed in Cultural Issues, Defense, Life on the Sea
ReutersReuters – 9 hrs ago

BEIJING (Reuters) - A Chinese freighter has been hijacked by pirates off southern Iran, the Chinese Embassy in Tehran reported on Friday.

The cargo ship, the "Xianghuamen," belongs to Nanjing Ocean Shipping Co Ltd in Nanjing, eastern China, the embassy said in a posting on its website.

The ship was commandeered Friday morning in the Gulf of Oman near the south Iranian port of Chabahar, the embassy said. The embassy is in touch with Iranian authorities and has asked the government to take all necessary steps to recover the vessel and its crew safely, according to the statement.

There were no other details, including the number of pirates or crew members.

An official with Nanjing Ocean Shipping contacted by telephone confirmed the hijacking, but would not provide further information.

(Reporting by Terril Yue Jones; Editing by Kim Coghill)

cannons

Dec 31
Posted by lfpl Filed in Defense, Parts of the Ship

CANNONS, SHIP:

Cannons are large pieces of artillery that uses projectiles and gunpowder. They can vary is size, range, caliber, mobility, rate/angle/type of fire, and firepower. Those on ships are usually a bit smaller than those used on land. The first use by Europeans was probably in Iberia in the 13th century. They have become very popular equipment aboard merchant, pirate, and military vessels during expeditions from the 16th-18th century.

Aboard the Upper Deck or Main Deck of the HMB Endeavour, which is architecturally based over the original drawings of the HMS Endeavour are numerous cannons and swivel guns used to defend the ship from hostiles by firing small to large shots. The swivel guns could be moved to the longboat and mounted there when the crew went ashore. The HMS had 12, the HMB replica only has 10. As per cannons, there would be four-pounder cannons or guns that would fire 4 pound cannon balls for defense. The original HMS had 10, but six were thrown overboard when it ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef to help lighten the ship. These were recovered in the 1970's discovery of them and are what the HMB's cannons are based after. The HMB still ofter fire them when arriving or departing ports, using traditional black powder. They are also decorated with King George II crown and cipher weights, broad arrow and other markings.

This article is by Thomas Baurley, volunteer tour guide of the HMB Endeavour while in port at Brisbane, Australia, and crew member during the 2011-2012 circumnavigation of Australia - for the Brisbane to Gladstone leg of the journey (April-May 2011).

For more Information About The Living History Museum on board the replica of the HMS Endeavour -
The HMB Endeavour, while docked in port at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Bibliography/Recommended Reading:

  • Australian National Maritime Museum
    2011: Guide Handbook. ( Issued during HMB Endeavour Around Australia 2011-2012: Voyage of a Lifetime ). ANMM: Sydney, Australia.
  • Macarthur, Antonia
    1998: "His Majesty's Bark Endeavour: The Story of the ship and her people". Angus & Robertson/ Harper Collins; ANMM: Sydney, Australia. ISBN: 0207191808.
  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
    2011 Website Referenced: ~ "Captain Cook", "HMB Endeavour", "HMS Endeavour", "cannons". en.wikipedia.org.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Articles and Research papers are done at the Author's expense. If you donate below, you'll help contribute to the costs of the research that provided this article. Any Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer's base location at time of request).

These articles are done by the writer at no payment. If you enjoy this article and want to see more, why not buy our writer a drink or meal to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this research?

swivel guns

Dec 31
Posted by lfpl Filed in Defense, Parts of the Ship

SWIVEL GUNS:

Along the sides of tall sailing ships were often found small cannons called "swivel guns". These were very popular from the 16th-18th centuries of sailing history. They were mounted on a small swiveling stand or fork which allowed for a wide arc of movement. These are often also detachable and can move from the host main ship to the long boat. They typically measure around 3 feet in length (1 meter) with a bore diameter of 1 1/4 inch (3.5 cm). They would be used to shoot a wide variety of ammo, but atypically would fire grapeshot or small diameter shot such as small caliber round shot. Most of these guns are muzzle loaded. Breech loaded guns had a breech shaped like a beer mug, where the shooter would take the handle and insert into the body of the gun with the breech's opening facing forwards. Gunpowder, then projectiles were loaded into the breech, then aimed and fired. Very common on sailing ships as short-range anti-personnel ordinances rather than causing damage to opposing ships. Some swivel guns have been used to fire harpoons during whaling expeditions. The very first swivel gun known was from China in 1520. By 1560's, the swivel gun was introduced to Europe and Korea.

Aboard the Upper or Main Deck of the HMB Endeavour, which is architecturally based over the original drawings of the HMS Endeavour, along the sides of the ship are swivel guns used to defend the ship from hostiles by firing small shots. These could be moved to the longboat and mounted there when the crew went ashore. The HMS had 12, the HMB replica only has 10. In addition to the swivel guns, there would be four-pounder cannons or guns that would fire 4 pound cannon balls for defense. The original HMS had 10, but six were thrown overboard when it ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef to help lighten the ship. These were recovered in the 1970's discovery of them and are what the HMB's cannons are based after. The HMB still ofter fire them when arriving or departing ports, using traditional black powder. They are also decorated with King George II crown and cipher weights, broad arrow and other markings.

This article is by Thomas Baurley, volunteer tour guide of the HMB Endeavour while in port at Brisbane, Australia, and crew member during the 2011-2012 circumnavigation of Australia - for the Brisbane to Gladstone leg of the journey (April-May 2011).

For more Information About The Living History Museum on board the replica of the HMS Endeavour -
The HMB Endeavour, while docked in port at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Bibliography/Recommended Reading:

  • Australian National Maritime Museum
    2011: Guide Handbook. ( Issued during HMB Endeavour Around Australia 2011-2012: Voyage of a Lifetime ). ANMM: Sydney, Australia.
  • Macarthur, Antonia
    1998: "His Majesty's Bark Endeavour: The Story of the ship and her people". Angus & Robertson/ Harper Collins; ANMM: Sydney, Australia. ISBN: 0207191808.
  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia.
    2011 Website Referenced: ~ "Captain Cook", "HMB Endeavour", "HMS Endeavour", "swivel guns". en.wikipedia.org.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Articles and Research papers are done at the Author's expense. If you donate below, you'll help contribute to the costs of the research that provided this article. Any Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer's base location at time of request).

These articles are done by the writer at no payment. If you enjoy this article and want to see more, why not buy our writer a drink or meal to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this research?