Category Archives: Nuremberg

Kaspar Hauser

The Story of Kaspar Hauser
(April 30, 1812 – December 17, 1833)
Ansbach, Bavaria, Germany
In the 19th century, around the streets of Nuremberg, Germany there appeared a small teenage boy with no family, little ability for speech, and no caretaker. From what could be determined was this poor child had grown up in the isolation of a darkened cell, and that he could quite possibly be a lost prince child of the House of Baden. It was on May 26 of 1828 that this foundling was discovered on the streets with a letter addressed to the 60th cavalry regiment 4th squadron Captain von Wessenig dated “From the Bavarian border / The place is not named [sic] / 1828”. The letter told that the boy was given into custody on the 7th October 1812 as an infant with instructions to teach him the Christian religion, reading, and writing; but with explicit orders for him never to “take a single step out of my house”. The letter stated the boy was to become a cavalryman – to enlist him or to hang him. Continue reading Kaspar Hauser

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Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 12, Part A (4/6) – Lord Christian’s Farm, Leaving Ansbach

Part A


Leaving Christian’s Family’s Farm

Monday, 6 April 2009
Ansbach, Germany

Rustled up by Lord Christian the explorers got their gear together and departed the farm. Today was the road trip to Wurzburg and the Castle Marionburg to accomplish the quest for the sacred key. Sir Thomas Leaf having some revelations overnight is realizing insight about the key and to stop looking for it buried in crypts, tombs, dungeons, and ancient ruins. But that it may exist in more ethereal form in the beauty of aspirations of life. So the quest begins to change as they begin the search for the key above ground to discover the mystery it beholds. Perhaps there is a gatekeeper to a secret world where this mystery lieth.

Continue reading Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 12, Part A (4/6) – Lord Christian’s Farm, Leaving Ansbach

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Veste Lichtenau (Castle Lichtenau)

Veste Lichtenau (Castle Lichtenau)
Staatsarchiv Nrnberg * Von-Heydeck-Strasse 3 * 91586 Lichtenau * Tel. 09827/92790
Along the Castle road, down in Bavaria, lies an impressive fortress that now holds the state archives of Nurnberg. This is “Veste Lichtenau”. Massive walls with formidable towers, this fortress served as the model for the Nuremberg Castle and reminds us that times were not peaceful in this area of old. This fortress existed between 1406-1806 (four hundred years of operation) protecting the small market towns that were owned by the free imperial city of Nuremberg. Afterwards, it held the cities history to this day. The feuds between the margraves of Ansbach and the Town Council of the free imperial city of Nuremberg were abundant, and eventually destroyed this fortress and market in 1229 and 1552. Afterwards it was rebuilt. The complex was built from 1558 to 1630 and was not substantially changed in the following years and the moat and enclosing walls are prominent and well preserved to this day. The bastions project outwards and are located at the corners of the polygon: the bear, the stag, the virgin battery, the dragon battery and the bell battery. A branch office of the State Archive of Nuremberg has been housed in Lichtenau Fortress for over 20 years. Because of this, it is only possible to view the castle complex by prior arrangement with the State Archive of Nuremberg, branch office Lichtenau. The exterior of the castle is fully accessible during the day. The “Castle Festival” takes place on the first weekend in July each year.


Veste Lichtenau, Germany

Continue reading Veste Lichtenau (Castle Lichtenau)

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Jugend-Hotel Nurnberg

Jugend-Hotel Nurnberg
* Rathsbergstr. 300 * 90411 Nrnberg, Germany * +49 911 5216092 * www.jugendhotel-nuernberg.de
A bit far off the beaten path lies this charming hostel with decent sized rooms, beds, and tiny bathrooms. They have over 120 rooms. Set in the woods by the airport, its like an old-fashioned adventurers hostel with nice natural scenic beauty around the grounds. The hostel is pretty spacious with lots of land for outdoor activities such as frisbee, barbeques, and sunbathing. Inside is a big lobby with a tv-lounge, internet room, and a dining hall. If you don’t have your own car, public transportation or cabs are a must in order to get into town due to the remote location. Reception desk hours are sporadic but the clerk is not too hard to find. Rating: 4.25 stars out of 5. Continue reading Jugend-Hotel Nurnberg

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The Druid (Nuremberg, Germany)



The Druid
* Weigerbergasse 18 * 90403 Nrnberg, Germany * +49 911 2059072 * www.thedruidpub.com

A great little Irish/English pub in the heart of the Nurnberg Old Town. It’s an authentic traditional Irish pub located on one of the most beautiful medieval streets in the city; housed in a four story 12th century building, next to Club Sixteen; it encompassed the first two floors and basement. Decorated with old timber, uneven stairs, and rough stone walls – it brings the charm of Ireland into Germany. Great whiskey and cottage pie. I’ve heard good things about the fish n’ chips and the beer as well. Staff was great. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

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Hallertor (Nurnberg, Germany)



The Hallertor
* Weigerbergasse 25 * 90403 Nrnberg, Germany * +49 911 2406611 * www.hallertor.de

A pretty happening bar in the old town district where cocktail specials are abundant during their late happy hour and some quite tasty concoctions. My favorite was “the swimming pool”. The waittresses were charming and very helpful, friendly, and good service. Around 10 or 11 they start Karaoke in the back which got quite crowded, and I’m not sure it was just our gang. Good times. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Landbierparadies (Nurnberg, Germany)



Landbierparadies
* Sterzinger Str. 4, Nrnberg – +49 911 4334722 * www.landbierparadies.com *
A decent sized pub with a backroom that can scrunch in over 30 (tightly) that has affordable prices, good beer, good food, and decent service. Of course we were a larger group, so I’m sure the service was difficult and I think the waiter did a wonderful job attending to us. They are open late serving beer and snacks. They also have a beer garden. The pub is known for its showcase beer from the small breweries in Franconia, especially those around Nuremburg, Bamburg, and Bayreuth. They also have some souvenir krugs for sale of which my daughter purchased – quality made and a good gift. I can’t comment on the beer as I don’t drink beer, but I’ve heard good things from the friends in our company and they seem to have enjoyed it enough to drink up a storm. Some of the favorites mentioned were Schluekla (smoked beer from Brauerei Saurer in Gunzendorf), Dunkles Vollbier from Brauerei Drummer in Leutenbach, and the Dunkles Vollbier from Brauerei Penning in Hetzelsdorf. The food itself was very good … I had a schnitzel, as my German is poor, and I couldn’t figure what else familiar to order. 🙁 Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.

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Nuremberg Johannisfriedhof Cemetery


Nuremberg Cemetery

Nuremberg Johannisfriedhof Cemetery
St. John’s Cemetery (Johannisfriedhof)is situated to the West of the Neutor and is the last resting place of many important citizens of Nuremberg and the surrounding area. Amongst the greats buried here are Albrecht Drer (painter), Veit Sto (craftsman) and Willibald Pirckheimer (humanist). The cemetery is composed of many sacrophagos-like tombstones that are decorated by bronze tablets with many interesting epitaphs engraved on them as well as depictions of coats of arms that give the professions of the dead. It is told that in the winter of 1993/94 antique-theives stole many of the bronze plates for their value on the black market. Established in the 13th century, it was not until after 1518 that people from the parish of St. Seebald were buried here, outside the city walls. There is a picturesque church within the cemetery that was built in the 14th century and was the only historic church in Nuremberg to escape the bombing raids. Continue reading Nuremberg Johannisfriedhof Cemetery

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Nrnberg, Germany

Nuremberg is located on the Pegnitz river and the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal. It is in the heart of the Franconia / Bavaria state of Germany. It is Franconia’s largest city and is located 170 km’s north of Munich. In 2006, it’s population was 500,132. It is located 302 meters above sea level. Nuremberg saw great expansion from 1050-1571 because it was located on one of the key trade routes for the region and thereby was referred to as the “unofficial capital” of the Holy Roman Emperor as often royal meetings took place at the Nuremberg Castle. In 1219 it became a Imperial Free City under Emperor Frederick II and was popular as one of the two great trade centers on the route from Italy to Northern Europe. 1298 saw a horrible massacre (one of several in the Rintfleisch Massacres) of the Jewish population as they were accused of having desecrated the host with a hidden agenda to combine the northern and southern parts of the city which were divided by the Pegnitz River – and since the Jews settled there, this was one of the means the city had of getting rid of them. The area is now the City Market, Frauenkirche, and the City Hall (Rathaus). From the 15th-16th centuries, the German Renaissance flowered in this center. Then in 1525, the Protestant Reformation took influence in the area, and in 1532 the religious Peace of Nuremberg was signed here. The Thirty Year’s War did its damage in 1632 and declined thereafter until recovery in the 19th century as it grew into an industrial center. Because of the bankruptcy after the war, Nuremberg was given to Bavaria who took over the debts and guaranteed amortization. Eventually Nazi Germany landed here. Because of its former relevance to the Holy Roman Empire, the Nazi Party chose the city to be the location for the huge Nazi Party conventions – the Nuremberg Rallies that were held from 1927-1938. When Hitler rose to power in 1933, the rallies became huge state propaganda events and Nuremberg became a center of Nazi ideals. It was here that Hitler ordered the Reichstag to convene at Nuremberg to pass anti-Semitic Law to revoke German citizenship for all Jews. Today there still remains many examples of Nazi architecture. With WWII, Nuremberg became the headquarters of Wehrkreis (military district) XIII and an important site for the production of airplanes, submarines, and tanks. Continue reading Nrnberg, Germany

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