Category Archives: palaces

Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado

Mesa Verde National Park

Mesa Verde National Park
https://www.nps.gov/meve/index.htm

Article currently being written. Expected publication date 2/16/17. Come back soon.

Mesa Verde National Park ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=30061) – Durango/Cortez area, Southwest Colorado, USA. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken February 11-13, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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The Dam (Amsterdam)

Carnivals / Fairs in Dam Square
Amsterdam, Holland

The “Dam Square” is the central most part of Amsterdam, minus Central Station. Its called “de Dam” in Dutch, or simply “The Dam”. Here resides notable buildings and events that bring together more visitors to the Netherlands than any other places in the country. Deep in the historical center of the city, it is located only 750 meters from “Centraal Station” – the main transportation hub. The square is rectangular in shape, roughly 200 x 100 meters in dimension. It connects Damrak, Rokin, Muntplein (Coin square), Nieuwendijk, Kalverstraat, Damstraat, and Muttoren streets. The main Red Light District (de Wallen) is a hop and a skip from here. On the west end is the neoclassical Royal Palace, bordered by the 15th century Gothic Nieuwe Kerk (New Church), and the Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum. The National Monument is in its heart which is a white stone pillar designed by J.J.P. Oud in 1956 to memorialize the victims of WWII, and is one of the most famous meeting places in the city, and is where the New Amsterdam tours meet daily. The NH Grand Hotel Krasnapolsky and the upscale department store “De Bijenkorf” also border the square. The square was originally a Dam built in 1270 until 1544 in the river Amstel. As the dam built up, it became wide enough for a town square, as the city developed around it. The square began with the “Naatje of the Dam” statue in 1890, but was taken down in 1914. The weigh house that once stood here was demolished in 1808 by order of Louis Bonaparte who complained it blocked his view from the royal palace. The Damrak of the Amstel River was partially filled in during the 19th century and became the land blocked square it is now since then. The first stock exchange, the Beurs van Zocher was also originally housed here, where the department store now sits. The square became a “national” square well known to everyone in the Netherlands and became the main location for demonstrations, riots, street performers, meetings, and celebrations. Every May 4th it houses the National Memorial Day celebration at the monument. Queens Day hosts a big funfair in the center. Throughout the year various fairs and carnivals will set up here too.

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Wurzburg, Germany


Entering Wurzburg

Wurzburg, Germany
Wurzburg is a Franconia city in the northern tip of Bavaria, Germany. It is located on the Main River approximately 120 kms from Frankfurt and Nuremberg by road and it is a center for culture, exports, trade, and commerce. It is the capital of the Regierungsbezirk Unterfranken. It is a German speaking city with the regional dialect as Franconian. The city itself is not included in the district of Wurzburg but is its administrative seat and holds a population of roughly 131,320 (2006 census). Wurzburg started as a Celtic fortification in 1000 BC where the Castle Marienberg now stands. As it was Christianized in 686 by Kilian, Colman, and Totnan; a group of Irish missionaries wanting to convert the area. First called Vurteburch in 704, the first diocese was founded by Saint Boniface in 742 who appointed Saint Burkhard as the first bishop of Wurzburg. The bishops created a duchy in the center of the city which extended throughout the 12th century to Eastern Franconia. Wurzburg became the seat of several Imperial diets, including the one of 1180, in which Henry the Lion was banned from the Empire and his duchy was handed over to Otto of Wittelsbach. [wikipedia] In 788, the first church was built and became the present Würzburg Cathedral and was later consecrated that same year by Charlemagne. It was converted to Romanesque style from 1040 to 1225. Wurzburg is also home to the infamous University: The University of Würzburg, which was founded in 1402 and re-founded in 1582.

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Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 12, Part B (4/6) – Wurzburg and Castle Marionburg, Return to Dusseldorf

Part B


View of Castle Marionburg from the bridge in Wurzburg

Monday, 6 April 2009
Wurzburg, Germany

The adventurers made it to Wurzburg. Wandering around the streets and exploring the artistic architecture, statues, and sights. The adventurers were in awe of what a beautiful city Wurzburg is. Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Vanssa, and Princess Brea crossed the bridge with all the statues to see how far a walk it would be to make it to the Castle on foot. Deciding against it, they opted for a scenic walk along the waterfront and over to the Tourist Information center. Soon thereafter, Lord Christian picked the group up in his motor-carriage and drove them up to the Castle. There they explored the still used interiors, walls, towers, and well. A key was held in the hand of a Saint and the other who may have held one, was missing the arm that would of held the missing key. Could this be the heavily sought after “Key?” to “Life”? Was the key in the hands of this other statue and cut off by someone who wanted “the sacred key of life”? Bedazzled and confused, the adventurers continued on as Sir Thomas Leaf believed a mighty Troll may have taken the Key to Belgium. Omens and prophecies said the key would be there. Being a reknown diviner – faith was planted to follow his intuition. After the castle, it was a couple hour drive to Dusseldorf. The party dropped by Sir Ingo the Great’s for some tea and cake, then Lady Vanessa lured Princess Breanna and Sir Thomas Leaf off for some Lebanese fast food. That evening they took it easy and settled down to a movie satisfied with their adventure.

 
The statues at Castle Marionburg, one holding a key, the other perhaps had the missing key

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Ansbach, Germany


Ansbach, Germany

Ansbach, Germany
www.ansbach.de
Ansbach or Anspach is a town of roughly 40,512 people in the Bavarian state of Germany (census 2004). It was originally called Onolzbach. It serves as the capital of the administrative region of Middle Franconia. 25 miles southwest of Nuremberg and 90 miles north of Munich, Ansbach has been an important center for Franconia and Bavaria. It resides on the Frankische Rezat, a tributary of the Main river. Ansbach started out as a Benedictine monastery in 748 by Gumbertus (a Franconian noble) who was later canonized. Centuries later, the monastery and its adjoining village called Onolzbach populated into the town that is now “Ansbach” (1221 AD). The counts of Oettigen ruled there until the Hohenzollern burgraves of Nuremberg took over in 1331 making the seat of their dynasty there until they acquired the Margraviate of Brandenburg in 1415. With the death of Frederick I (Elector of Brandenburg) in 1440, the Franconian cadet branch of the family was not politically united with the main Brandenburg line remaining independent as “Brandenburg-Ansbach”. Continue reading Ansbach, Germany

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The Ansbach Residence (Ansbach, Germany)


Ansbach Residence, Ansbach, Germany

Ansbach Residence, Ansbach, Bavaria, Germany
* Schloss- und Gartenverwaltung Ansbach * Promenade 27 · 91522 Ansbach * Tel. (09 81) 95 38 39 -0 · Fax (09 81) 95 38 39 -40 * sgvansbach@bsv.bayern.de *
RESIDENCE AND COURT GARDEN OF THE MARGRAVES OF ANSBACH
OPENING TIMES OF THE RESIDENCE: April – September: 9am – 6pm; October – March: 10am – 4pm; Closed Mondays. The palace can only be visited by participating in a guided tour. Tours (ca. 50 minutes) take place every hour until 5pm in the summer and until 3pm in the winter.
The Residence of the Margraves of Ansbach were under reconstruction and revitalization while we visited, so unfortunately couldn’t take a very good look at the exterior of this palace since the scaffolding was blocking the view. We did however take the 50-minute guided tour into the interior, no photographs were permitted, and the guided tour was in German. Luckily I had the pleasure of a best friend accompanying me and giving me the translations, as well as a english guide i could read while touring. Great history and phenomenal art within. I was quite impressed. According to the brochure: “The Residence of Ansbach originated as a medieval complex. The large Gothic Hall with its ribbed vault, in which the largest collection of faience and porcelain from the former Ansbach Manufactory is now on display, was built in around 1400. The medieval complex was redesigned as a modern residence between 1705 and 1730.
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