Category Archives: Virginia

Super 8

Super 8 Motels
~ Worldwide ~

I’ve spent many nights at the Super 8 – some locations are amazing, others can be seedy. It depends on the city and the manager, neighborhood, and environment. They are one of the world’s largest budget hotel chains – with motels throughout the United States, Canada, and China. They are part of the Wyndham Worldwide chain. The chain was started by Dennis Brown in 1972 alongside his partner Ron Rivett in 1973. They started renting rooms for $8.88/night which gave name to “Super 8”. The first motel was in Aberdeen South Dakota, hosting 60 rooms in 1974. It had a stucco exterior with an English Tudor style inspired by Rivett’s father-in-law who did stucco construction for a living, the remaining architecture was created by Rivett. Through the years they kept the English Tudor style as well as locating themselves near Holiday Inn’s as a marketing strategy. The first franchise was sold in 1976 in Gillette, Wyoming. They broke out of the Midwest in 1978 opening up in New York and Washington State. In 1976 they created a VIP club program which was later purchased by Hospitality Franchise Systems, then Cendant in 1993. This was dissolved in 2003 and replaced by TripRewards converting to Wyndham Rewards in 2008. By 2014 they had over 2,390 hotels. They opened their first hotel in China during 2004 in Beijing. They offer their guests standard amenities including free WiFi, a continental breakfast, hair dryers, coffee makers, laundry, and a lobby. Some locations have pools and meeting rooms, while some of the larger Super 8’s have restaurants.

Locations I’ve visited:

  • Lincoln City, Oregon: 3517 N, US-101, Lincoln City, OR 97367; (541) 996-9900. Rating: 4 stars out of 5. This location has a fabulous tourism placement across from a public beach. Its a rather small building and hotel with few rooms. Its less than a mile from the Chinook Winds casino. They have mini-fridges and microwaves in the room, coin laundry, free coffee, truck parking, and a small conference room. Its located along Highway 101.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Yorktown Colonial National Historical Park, Yorktown, Virginia

Yorktown Colonial National Historical Park * http://www.nps.gov/colo * PO BOX 210, Yorktown, Virginia 23690 *


Yorktown Battlefield

Another National Park of the Historic Triangle lies a small museum and visitor center where the staff will orientate you on the history of the Yorktown Colonial National Battlefield with dioramas showing scenes from life around the battle as well as welcoming you aboard a mock ship from the era. The Visitor center is surrounded by British defensive earthenworks preserved from the battles. There is a 16 minute film on the history of the battle presented within on the “Siege of Yorktown”. General George Washington’s military tents can be viewed as well as artifacts from the siege. After the visitor center, drive the self-guided driving tour around the battlefields for seven miles viewing American and French siege lines, visit the Moore House, and the site of the surrender negotiations ending the Siege, where the British army grounded their weapons in an elaborate ceremony. I’m a history buff, but I’m not much on historic battlefield sites and exhibits, so I can’t say it was one of the highlights of my trip but for the history buff of the era I’m guessing its worth a gander. The center and park was put together very nicely though the driving tour was confusing. Rating 2.5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/22/2008.

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Thai Culpeper, Culpeper, Virginia

Thai Culpeper
Thai Culpeper

Thai Culpeper * 401 S. Main St., Culpeper, VA 22701 * (540) 829-0777

Right on historic main street in the heart of Culpeper Virginia, located within the historic Lord Culpeper Hotel resides a fusion of old Virginia architecture and Asian cuisine. The staff was very pleasant and quick and the food divine. I tried the fresh Seafood Pad Thai that was riddled with mussels, scallops, shrimp, and squid – it was one of the best Pad Thai I’ve had in awhile. If I can find it again, I’ll be back if ever in the area again. Rating 5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/23/08.

seafood pad thai
Seafood Pad Thai and Thai ice tea
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Dark Hollow Falls, Shenandoah National Park

Dark Hollow Falls
Dark Hollow Falls

Dark Hollow Falls @ Shenandoah National Park * http://www.nps.gov/shen/ * Shenandoah National Park, 3655 US Hwy 211 East, Luray, Virginia 22835 * 540.999.3500
Just outside of Big Meadows and a couple miles down from the road lies Dark Hollow Falls. These falls can get crowded because they are located just across Skyline Drive from Big Meadows Campgrounds which is a very popular attraction. The main falls are a set of four cascades that drop roughly 71 feet. Distance of hike: 5.5 miles round trip, Elevation gain: 1400 ft, average hike time : 3 hours, difficulty: moderate. Hiking loop. Rating 3 stars out of 5. Visited 5/23/08. (Lat:38.5306 Lon:-78.4404)

Dark Hollow Falls

spider web by Dark Hollow Falls
spider web by Dark Hollow Falls

ferns by Dark Hollow Falls

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Shenandoah National Park

Shenandoah National Park
Shenandoah National Park

Shenandoah National Park* http://www.nps.gov/shen/ * Shenandoah National Park, 3655 US Hwy 211 East, Luray, Virginia 22835 * 540.999.3500

What a beautiful day for a beautiful drive through Shenandoah National Park. Having roughly 1/2 a day to explore, I decided to drive from the Front Ryal (North) Entrance Station down to Big Meadows (Dark Hollow Falls) and then make my way down hwy 33 at Swift Run Gap back towards civilization. I figured a nice day hike and absorbing the panoramic overlooks would be a nice afternoon in the park, and I was right. Much natural beauty, scenic overlooks, abundant wildlife, and fabulous hiking trails. There are Park service gift shops and information centers all along the route as well as places where you can get food. The scenic roadway, also known as “Skyline Drive” follows the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains for 105 miles. The National Park empties out on its southern entrance into the Blue Ridge Parkways which stretches 469 miles to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Skyline Drive is a narrow mountain road with beautiful vistas and wildflowers along the shoulders and hosts over 75 scenic overlooks with each of their own unique panoramas. Shenandoah hosts over 500 miles of trails for the hiker – detailed maps can be obtained at the visitor centers and www.snpbooks.org or downloaded from the above Park Service link. The park like all parks are a sanctuary and home to numerous plants, animals, and historic objects. Excellent park, will definitely be back. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/23/08.

view from Skyline Drive
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George Washington Memorial Parkway

side park off GW

George Washington Memorial Parkway* http://www.nps.gov/gwmp/ * Washington, D.C.

Often nicknamed “The Road to Adventure” which was suitable as it gave me my route out of D.C. to the famous Shenandoah National Park. Locals call it “GW Parkway”. This memorial parkway is managed by the National Park Service and was designed as a gateway and greenway for the Nation’s capital. Most of the natural areas on the Parkway have no admission fee, though Great Falls Park does. The CIA’s headquarters are also in the Parks. The parkway is located mostly in Northern Virginia though a small section passes over Columbia Island which is within the District of Columbia. Its joined by Washington Street (SR 400) in Alexandria, Virginia; then runs with Clara Barton Parkway that runs on the opposite side of the Potomac River in DC and Motgomery County, Maryland. There was a fourth section planned but it was never built.

overlooking the Potomac
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Waterstreet Landing, Yorktown, Virginia

Waterstreet Landing * #17 Water Street, Yorktown, Virginia * 757.886.5890

A quaint “diner-like” restaurant right on the beach with full view of the York river, sunbathers, and beach-goers. Of course, no shirt no service, no uncovered beachware at this establishment. Beer and soda, sandwiches, and family dining with a view of the York River from every seat. They boast specialty sandwiches, gourmet pizza, fresh seafood, steak, and homemade desserts serving lunch and dinner. During my visit, I had a pretty delicious Norfolk Crabcake sandwich, so was quite satisfied myself. Rating 3.75 stars out of 5. Visited 5/22/08.

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Medical Shop, Yorktown, Virginia


Medical House



Medical Shop (reconstructed) [Nation Park Service Monument marker sign ] “I must … request that your Lordship will inform me of the reason of Dr. Griffin’s confinement on Board of one of your Prison ships.” [Governor Thomas Nelson Jr to General Charles Lord Cornwallis, September 25, 1781] Dr Corbin Griffin was a prominent Yorktown physician active in the American Revolutionary War serving as a surgeon for Union Forces. During the siege of Yorktown, he was imprisoned on a British ship anchored in the York river. During his confinement, his “cellar down the watter side” was pilfered by sailors from the British sloop Bonneta while other British troops took items from his medical shop.


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Yorktown Waterfront, Yorktown, Virginia


Yorktown waterfront



Yorktown Waterfront Union Port and Supply Depot [City Monument marker sign ] “1862 Peninsular Campaign” In Spring 1862, The Confederate heavy artillery batteries on the bluffs of Yorktown, as well as those positioned along the waterfront on both sides of the York River, effectively blocked the US Navy’s attempt to bypass Magruder’s 2nd Peninsula Defensive line. The waterfront fortifications were built by Maj. Gen. John Bankhead Magruder’s Army of the Peninsula and Confederate naval personnel. The earthworks on Yorktown’s inland perimeter were mostly constructed atop the British defenses from the 1781 siege. On the night of May 3-4, 1862, the Confederate Army abandoned the 2nd Defensive line. Gen. Joseph E Johnston, CSA, believed that the confederate positions could not withstand Maj. Gen George B McClellan’s USA elaborately prepared bombardment with heavy siege guns. The Confederate army was prevented from evacuating its heavy equipment and artillery via the York River because McClellan’s Siege Battery #1 comprised of 100-200 pound Parrot Siege cannon, had already bombarded the waterfront. The Confederate evacuations suddenly converted Yorktown into a busy port supporting the Union advance on Richmond. Members of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery retrieved the ordinance from the siege batteries around the town, and troops assembled at Yorktown to be transported up river to the Federal base at White House on the Pamunkey River, a tributary of the York River. As the Peninsula Campaign continued casualties from the battles around Richmond were transported to Yorktown which became a major hospital area. Following the 1862 Peninsula Campaign, Yorktown became a Union garrison and headquarters for a federally held district which includes WIlliamsburg and Glouchester Point. Its waterfront area was an active port for Union forces until the summer of 1864 when the Union army established a supply base at City Point on the James river during the Petersburg Campaign.


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Custom House, Yorktown, Virginia


Custom House



Custom House ca 1720 – [NPS Monument marker sign ] “… collectors are hereby empowered to demand, secure, and receive all … the duties, customes, and imposts … with full power to go on board any boat, ship, or other vessel, or into any house … where he shall have just cause to suspect any fraud … collectors … shall .. in Aprill and October … render a true and just account upon oath, and make payment … of money as they … shall receive and collect for the duties … “ [An Act for Ports &c, April 16, 1691, Virginia Legislative Assembly]. In 1691, Virginia’s colonial legislature passed “An Act for Ports”, in an effort to better regulate trade for the collection of import and export fees and duties. The act called for the creation of several ports, including Yorktown, and the appointment of Collector of Ports by the royal governor. During Yorktown’s peak as a commercial port in the mid-1700s, Richard Ambler, and later his son, Jacquelin, served as collector of ports. In 1721, Richard Ambler built this large, brick storehouse and from here he and his son handled their collector duties. Ship captains recently arriving and merchants arranging for transport of goods would convene at Ambler’s storehouse to complete the required paperwork and pay the assessed fees. The outbreak of the American Revolution brought an end to many port activities, including the collection of customs. In 1776, Virginia militia troops were using the custom house for barracks and two years later, Jacquelin Ambler sold the property. In 1924, the Comte de Grasse Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution purchased the Custom House and restored it five years later. Today the Customs house still continues in use as a Chapter House and Museum.


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Yorktown, Virginia

Old Yorktown, Virginia * http://www.yorkcounty.gov/tourism/


Yorktown, Virginia

Yorktown was named after England’s York and was established as a port for shipping tobacco to Europe. It is the 3rd part of Virginia’s infamous “Historic Triangle” that connects it with Jamestown and Williamsburg. Yorktown is a small village of roughly 203 citizens (2000 census) and is considered a “Census-designated place” in York County, Virginia. It is also York County’s county seat and is one of the eight original shires that formed in colonial Virginia in 1634. Yorktown is most famous for the surrender of General Cornwallis of the English army to General George Washington of the newly forming United States of America in 1781. It was this surrender that effectively ended the American Revolutionary War even though the war continued for another year. It was here as well that another American war – the American Civil War (1861-1865) prominently figurred as a placehold in being a major port that supplied northern and southern towns thereby placing it into being a battlefield a second time. There are only 9 buildings that survive from the Colonial period as well as many of the earthworks dug by the besieging American and French forces. There is also a memorial to the French war dead of the battle. Its a small quaint town. Nothing like Jamestown or Williamsburg and holds an attraction of its own. While I was visiting, most of the museums of historic buildings were closed and there were no activities. It does have a nice public white-sand beach great for summer activities and a little bit of shopping. Its a nice exit to the excitement of Jamestown and Williamsburg. Rating 3.5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/22/2008.

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Yorktown National Colonial Historical Site, Yorktown, Virginia

Yorktown Colonial National Historical Park * http://www.nps.gov/colo * PO BOX 210, Yorktown, Virginia 23690 *


Yorktown Battlefield

Another National Park of the Historic Triangle, is a small museum and visitor center where the staff will orientate you on the history of the Battlefield, dioramas showing scenes from life around the battle, and a mock ship you can board. The Visitor center is surrounded by British defensive earthenworks, a 16 minute film on the history of the battle is presented within on the “Siege of Yorktown”. General George Washington’s military tents can be viewed, and artifacts from the siege. After the visitor center, drive the self-guided driving tour around the battlefields for seven miles viewing American and French siege lines, visit the Moore House, the site of the surrender negotiations ending the Siege, where the British army grounded their weapons in an elaborate ceremony. I’m a history buff, but I’m not much on historic battlefield sites and exhibits, so I can’t say it was one of the highlights of my trip. The center and park was put together very nicely though but the driving tour was confusing. Rating 2.5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/22/2008.

In the Spring of 1781 the American War of Independence entered its seventh year. Having practically abandoned their efforts to reconquer the northern states, the British still had hopes of subjugating the South. By trying to do so, they unwittingly set in motion a train of events that would give independence to their colonies and change the history of the world.

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Ghosts of Williamsburg Candlelight Walking Tour – Williamsburg, VA

Wednesday, 21 May 2008 – Part 6 (8:00-9:30 pm)
Williamsburg, Virginia

So many people showed up for the Ghost walking tours this evening that they had to split us up into 4 separate tours. Interesting. This is with only one company. There were several other companies with the same amount of crowds, it was crazy.

Ghosts of Williamsburg candlelight walking Tour * http://www.theghosttour.com/ * meet in front of the William and Mary bookstore at the main gate for historic Williamsburg, Virginia * 757. 565.4821


numerous orbs in front of the George Wythe House

A crowd is led by lantern candle light down the streets of historic Colonial Williamsburg and on the site of the 2nd oldest University in the United States – William and Mary. For only $10 you get an hour long tour covering various subjects of folklore and haunted history in the area that eventually leads you to the graveyard. Based on the book The Ghosts of Williamsburg by L.B. Taylor. It was a very interesting and informative walk. I thought I caught a glimpse of something in the window of the Indian dorm on William and Mary, as well as something in the shadows near the George Wythe House. Looking over the photographs, lots of orbs and interesting elements and oddities to the pictures. Great tour! According to the tour guides it’s notorious that the cameras attract and capture unexplainable orbs, vapors, colors and shapes.”
Rating 4.5 stars out of 5. Taken 5/21/2008.

Afterwards, I returned to the hostel and had a good night’s rest. Tomorrow Yorktown and then a return to Washington D.C. for the remainder of the National Geographic Society Live events on the Hidden Treasures of Afghanistan, as well as attending “Goth Prom”.

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Josiah Chownings’ Tavern, Williamsburg, Virginia

Josiah Chowning’s Tavern (Duke of Gloucester Street, Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia)


Josiah Chowning’s Tavern



A wink from a cute barmaid lured me into this fine and festive, speedy service establishment. Fashioned in Colonial style decor and architecture, as is every establishment in Colonial Williamsburg, lies Josiah Chowning’s tavern in the heart of the old town. They boast a daytime menu that has quick fresh fare such as pulled pork, beef brisket, hickory-grilled hamburgers, salads, and other sandwiches. In the evening, it becomes a true 18th century rum and alehouse, serving light fare, local ales and wines, rums, and Colonial Williamsburg’s own draft root beer. Balladeers lead guests in rousing sing-alongs and constumed servers invite patrons to play popular colonial games. I feasted on the small and pricey, but delicious crab cake sandwich while sitting with a couple from Texas as there are no private tables at this pub. Entertained by fiddlers and violinists, a magician, and comedy … my quickly served dinner snacking on bowls of peanuts while awaiting the food gave my feet a good rest and my spirit an uplift as I tried to figure out entertainment for the rest of the evening. Rating: 4 stars out of 5. Visited 5/21/08.


evening entertainment in the pub



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Jamestown Island, Jamestown, Virginia

Jamestown Island / Jamestown National Park (Jamestown, Virginia)


first views of settling America
waterways of Colonial Jamestown Island, Virginia

Upon exiting Jamestown Historical Site visitors are presented with an option to explore the remainder of the island, and to take the 3 or 5 mile driving tour around the loop following the higher ground of the island. Planted every 1/4-1/2 mile usually is a marker telling the tale of the island outside of the Jamestown settlement. You’ll pass the site of a Confederate fort, through the Pitch and Tar Swamp, At the point of the island is a small hiking trail that leads to the Black Point that hosts white sand, marsh, pine trees, swamps, and beautiful views. The island formed many thousands of years ago, from a series of shoals along the James River. The Colonists arrived in 1607 to find an isthmus that connected the island to the mainland as well as a “paradise” of virgin hardwoods suitable for building their settlement. Unfortunately in the 1800’s, the isthmus eroded away and the forests cleared for farming. After Jamestown moved to Williamsburg, the island became a plantation run by the Ambler and Travis families. During the Civil War, confederate forts guarded the river channel. Today its in the hands of the National Park service where it has been healed and is regenerating. I quite enjoyed the peaceful drive and walk about the area. Rating: 3 stars out of 5. Visited 5/21/08.


driving map route of Historic Jamestowne Island, Virginia


Black Point, Jamestowne Island, Virginia

pathway to Black Point


“Bricks and Tiles”

The colonists at Jamestown produced most of their own brick and tile locally at each building site. Bricks were used for houses, wells, and walkways, tiles for floors and roofs. Three kilns have been excavated at Jamestown, each producing bricks of unique size and shape. Bricks also varied in hardness and color with the clay used and the length of time they were fired. Such differences can help date archaeological remains to a time a kiln was active.

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Delftware Pottery, Jamestown, Virginia

Delftware

“Angelo, a African who lived on the Pierce household, probably used everyday European made domestical articles similar to these pewter spoons, and Delftware pottery excavated from the Pierce property in New Towne:
(1) Delftware Drug Jar: ca 1630-1670 made in England, earthenware.
(2) Spoon. ca 17th c. pewter
(3) Delftware Dish. ca 1625-1650, made in the Netherlands, earthenware.
(4) Delftware plate. ca 1640-1675. made in England. earthenware.


Delftware pottery and pewter spoon on display at Jamestown exhibit
Jamestowne National Park Site, Jamestown, Virginia
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Governor Yeardley’s Lot, Jamestown, Virginia

Governor Yeardley’s Lot, 1620’s
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]
“… for his conveniency and the more Commodity of his houses and dwellings.” (Yeardley’s land patent, 1624)

“George Yeardley arrived in Jamestown in 1610, was appointed captain of the guard, and eventually lieutenant governor. Later knighted and appointed Governor of Virginia in 1618, he issued the Great Charter in 1619, establishing the first representative government in Virginia. In 1620, Yeardley acquired a seven-and-a-quarter-acre lot extending east of this location. A 1625 muster roll listed the member’s of Yeardley’s large household: Yeardley, his wife Lady Temperance Yeardley; their three children; and 24 servants, including three African men and five African women (8 of the first 9 Africans documented at Jamestown). Their muster also listed 50 cattle, 40 swine, and 11 goats and kids on Yeardley’s lot. In addition to three dwellings, Yeardley owned three boats … a barque, four ton shallop, and skiff. At this location, archaeologists excavated the brick foundations of a structure that may have been Yeardley’s. Scattered building materials along Back River suggest that two additional dwellings, perhaps for servants, may have been located at the eastern end of his lot. ”


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Captain John Smith statue, Jamestown, Virginia


statue of Captain John Smith


Captain John Smith
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]

“John Smith was born about 1580 the son of a yeoman farmer of modest means. As a young man he travelled through Europe and fought as a soldier in the Netherlands and in Hungary. There he was captured, taken to Turkey and sold into slavery in Russia. He murdered his master, escaped, and journeyed back to Hungary to collect a promised reward of money and a coat-of-arms. He returned to England in time to participate in the settlement of Virginia. He was a arrogant and boastful man, often tactless and often brutal. Physically strong and worldly wise, he made an excellent settler. However, his personality, his obvious qualifications and his low social position infuriated many of the colonists leaders and settlers. Despite this, he was named to the first Council in May 1607. He learned the Indians’s language and became the colony’s principal indian trader. During the summer of 1608 he led a 3,000 mile expedition in an open boat to explore and map Cheasapeake Bay and ints principle rivers. On September 10, 1608 – the Council elected him Governor of Virginia for a one-year term. He was an able leader who understood both the Indians and the settler’s needs and the colony prospered. Captain Smith returned to England in October 1609, following an accidental gunpowder burn and became Virginia’s most effective propagandist and historian. His True Relation of Virginia (1608), Map of Virginia (1612), and General History of Virginia (1624) presented the colony as Smith understood it. In 1614 he made a short voyage to New England where he explored and mapped the coast from Cape Cod to Maine. Smith returned to England and never visited Virginia again, never married, and never received the recognition he thought he deserved. He died June 21, 1631 and was buried in St. Sepulchre’s Church in London. The statue erected by William Couper was erected in 1909.


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Pocahontas Statue, Jamestown, Virginia


Pocahontas statue
Jamestowne National Park Site, Jamestown, Virginia


Pocahontas
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]

“Erected in 1922, this statue by William Ordway Partridge, honors Pocahontas, the favorite daughter of Paramount Chief Wahunsenacawh (better known as Powhatan), ruler of the Powhatan Paramount Chiefdom. Pocahontas was born around 1595 probably at Werowocomoco, 15 miles from Jamestown. In 1608, she made frequent and welcome visits to Jamestown, often bringing gifts of food from her father. Captain John Smith believed she saved his life twice during the colony’s first years. In April of 1613, Captain Argall kidnapped Pocahontas and brought her to Jamestown. While a hostage she learned lessons in Christianity, converted, and was baptised. Her marriage to John Rolfe in April 1614 helped establish peaceful relations between the Powhatan and the Colonists. In 1616 she visited England with Rolfe and their infant son Thomas, and was presented to the Royal Court. She died on March 21, 1617 and was buried in St. George’s Church in Gravesend, England. Today many Americans claim descent from her son and granddaughter.


Pocahontas display
Jamestowne National Park Site, Jamestown, Virginia
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Burials JR102C and 156C, Jamestown Historical Site, Virginia

Burial JR102C
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]
“Burial site of a European man, aged about 19, a gunshot victim, interred sometime during the years 1607-1620”

Burial JR156C
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]
“Burial site of a European woman, aged between 40 and 55, interred in the 1620’s”


Burial JR1046B
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]
“Burial of a European Man estimated age mid-thirties, interred with a captain’s leading staff, this is likely the grave of Captain Bartholomew Gosnold, the ‘prime moving’ force behind the ‘plantation’ here at Jamestown”


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Doom Gloom Goth Night, Norfolk, Virginia


picture from Doom Gloom’s
photo gallery of the dancefloor
 
Me, Graves, and his gang


Doom Gloom @ the Wave

http://www.thewavenorfolk.com/ * 4107 Colley Ave in Norfolk Virginia.

Nestled in a neighbourhood on the coast of Chesapeake Bay in Norfolk, Virginia lies a neat little gay club called “The Wave”. On tuesday nights it hosts Norfolk’s only Goth/Industrial night called “Doom Gloom”. 18 plus, 10-2, great music and drink specials, lots of dancing and socializing. 2 rooms and a smoke patio, even though smoking is still allowed in the club (as it appears most establishments in Virginia) and a pool room. The younger crowd is a bit more raver than goth, light sticks seem to be a common theme, but the music selections will cover old school tastes without contemplation. During my 5/20/08 visit I had fun especially as I ran into an old friend and partied the night away. Good times. Rating: 4 1/2 stars out of 5.


 
light stick haven
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Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia

Historic Colonial Williamsburg * Williamsburg, Virginia (downtown) * http://www.history.org/

In this very pristine historic living history town costumed actors bring to life the incendiary passions of the Revolution on the streets of Colonial Williamsburg so that the future may learen from the past. While you can do historic Williamsburg without purchasing a ticket, they highly encourage it and emphasize that its a must (though I didn’t have any problems without a pass). I didn’t bother with one because I only went in the evenings and late afternoons – maybe that’s why. If you’ve got it, buy a pass to help support this wonderful project. General admission passes include access to a variety of Historic Area buildings and exhibits, the Museums of Colonial Williamsburg, and regular daytime programs. Some offer discounts on evening performances and other perks. Bus transportation is included in your Colonial Williamsburg admission. Access to as many as 20 to 40 Historic Area buildings and exhibits (depending on season and operating schedules), such as the Capitol, Raleigh Tavern, Great Hopes Plantation, all historic trades sites (wheelwright, blacksmith, silversmith, milliner, wigmaker, etc.), all gardens, and all original 18th-century exhibition sites (the Courthouse, Gaol, Magazine, and the homes of Peyton Randolph and George Wythe), along with admission to Revolutionary City®. Check Colonial Williamsburg This Week for openings. Also includes Capitol tour, orientation tour, regular daytime programs*, and viewing of the movie classic Williamsburg—The Story of a Patriot. Plus, free parking at the Visitor Center and use of Historic Area shuttle buses. ($37/adults; $18 for ages 6-17)


Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of Williamsburg, Virginia and consists of many of the buildings that existed from 1699 to 1780 that formed the colonial capital of Williamsburg and a thriving pivotal point of the historic triangle (Jamestown and Yorktown). It was once the center for Government, education, and culture in the Colony of Virginia. As a historical re-enactment village, its meant to be an interpretation of a Colonial American city with exhibits including dozens of authentic and accurately-recreated colonial houses, shops, and activity grounds including the Raleigh Tavern, the Capital building, the Governor’s Palace, and Bruton Parish Church. The Historic area is located just east of the College of William and Mary that was founded at Middle Plantation in 1693 just prior to the establishment of the town as capital of Virginia. the restoration and recreation of Colonial Williamsburg, one of the largest historic restorations ever undertaken, was championed by the Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin and the patriarch of the Rockefeller family, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., along with the active participation of his wife, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, who wanted to celebrate the patriots and the early history of the United States.
Rating: 5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/20/08, 5/21/08, and 5/22/08.











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Captain George’s Seafood Restaurant, Williamsburg, VA


Captain George’s Seafood Restaurant, Williamsburg, Virginia



Captain George’s Seafood Restaurant * 5363 Richmond Road | Williamsburg, VA 23185 * (757) 565-2323 * http://www.captaingeorges.com

A legendary enormous seafood buffet with some of the freshest and most delicious seafood available. They have four locations – one in Myrtle Beach, SC; and three in Virginia. I visited the Williamsburg, Virginia location on 5/20/08. Captain Georges was started in 1978 by George and Sherry Pitsilides who wanted to provide fresh seafood in an all-you-can eat buffet featuring more than 70 items. Their menu often consists of She-Crab Soup, New England Clam Chowder, Snow Crab Legs, Steamed Spiced Shrimp, Prime Rib, Fresh Broiled Salmon, Seafood Casserole, Steamed Clams, Steamed Mussels, Norfolk Special, Fried Scallops, Fried Trout, Fried Shrimp, Baked Imperial Crabmeat Supreme, BBQ Ribs, Hampton-Style
Crab Cakes, Stuffed Mushrooms, Broiled Chicken, Oven Fried Clam Strips, Captain’s Own Deviled Crab, Manicotti, Stuffed Clams, A Variety of Fresh Broiled Fish, Clams Casino, Oysters Rockefeller, Hard Blue Crabs, Fresh Baked Breads as the main courses with just as many vegetables and sides and desserts offered. The food was fabulous as was the service. Rating 5 stars out of 5.

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Janus International Hostel, Williamsburg, Virginia


Janus International Hostel, Williamsburg, Virginia

Janus International Hostel * 5437 Richmond Road, Williamsburg, Virginia *

Centrally located and close to Historic Williamsburg activities, a short commute from Jamestown, Yorktown, and Busch Gardens – this International hostel is placed in a former motel where hostellers can affordably get their own private rooms that are styled after motel rooms – own bathtub / shower, king size bed or double beds, microwave, fridge, air conditioner, electronic room keys. Rooms come with linens and parking. There are common rooms, shared kitchens, and a swimming pool. Lots of international hostellers during the summer, everyone is friendly and very social. My visit was very enjoyed. Thank you. Rating 4.5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/20/08 and 5/21/08.




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