Category Archives: Kailua-Kona

Huggo’s On the Rocks (Kona, Big Island, Hawaii)


Huggo’s on the Rocks, Kona

Huggo’s On the Rocks
* http://www.huggos.com/ * 75-5828 Kahakai Road Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 * (808) 329-1493 * Fax # (808)329-7204 **
A great casual bar in the heart of Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii. Definitely idolic of the ‘beach’ bar atmosphere and setting – this ocean-front cocktail bar and pub is an off-shoot of the Huggo’s Restaurant next door. My one and only visit found it to be very friendly, hospitable, with great service and good bar staff. The patrons all looked happy and satisfied. The drinks served to us were good – though not as potent as I’m used to. They had a live band this saturday night, even though the town closes early on the entertainment front. But dancing and fun had by all. They don’t really have an official “closing” hour – they are just open from 11:30 am until ‘closing’ – whatever that normally means – was quite early the saturday of August 8th, 2009. Generally they have entertainment nightly from 6:30 pm – 10 pm, and serve cocktails from 11:30 am until midnight. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Outrigger Hotel – Kona, Big Island, Hawaii


Outrigger Hotel, Kona

Outrigger Hotel
* 78-261 Manukai Street, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, 96740 * Toll-free U.S., Canada, Guam: 800-959-5662 or local: 808-322-9625
* http://www.outrigger.com/hotels-resorts/hawaiian-islands/hawaii-big-island/outrigger-kanaloa-at-kona *

A beautiful, elegant, and spacious resort located on 18 acres of ocean-front lava rock beach that overlooks stunning Keauhou Bay. The hotel and resort is encircled by well groomed gardens that create a nice private space with tall coconut palms, tropical blossoms, soft grasses, and lush lauae ferns. Inside the hotel are roomy condo units with open-beamed ceilings and spacious covered balconies with breath-taking views of the sea. Condos are available in 1 and 2 bedrooms, or a 2-bedroom with loft units. Each room is breeze cooled with ceiling fans, though some units have air conditioning upon request. Free wireless internet is available in the lobby, swimming pool area, and other areas of the resort. The hotel is home to three swimming pools, five barbeque grills, two tennis courts, connection to the Kona Country Club which has a 36-hole golf course, and is connected to a public beach which is well-known as a spectacular snorkeling site on Kealakekua Bay as well as the Puuhonua o Honaunau National Histori Park. Resort requires a two-night minimum to book a room and a three-night minimum on U.S. holiday weekends. While I did not stay at the hotel and only visited the resort during the day – I was impressed, even though I thought it was rather expensive. Cannot comment on staying in the condo-rooms, but the resort was A+. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.


Outrigger Hotel, Kona

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Pu-ukohola heiau National Historic Site / Kohala


Big Island


Pu-ukohola heiau National Historic Site / Kohala

Kona, Big Island, Hawaii

Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site is located right off to the side of the infamous Outrigger Hotel. It is a National Register historic site that preserves the ruins of one of Hawaii’s most major native temples. The temple existed from the time that Kamehameha I took control of northern and western Hawaii in 1782 and was attacked by his cousin Keoua Kuahu’ula who controlled the eastern side of the island. Eight years of fighting through to 1790, this temple was built to gain the favor of the war god Kuka’ilimoku in order to assist in the conflicts. The temples name means “Temple on the Hill of the Whale” because it was built on an older 1580 temple, by hand, with no mortar, in less than a year. Red stones were professed to be transported by a human chain about 14 miles long from the Pololu Valley in the East. The ship “Fair American” was captured in 1790 with a surviving crew member named Isaac Davis after the incident at Olowalu, who became military advisors to King Kamehameha teaching his army the use of muskets and mounted cannons giving defeat to the invaders. The temple was finished in the summer of 1791 measuring 224 x 100 feet. The battle took place in 1791 when the temple was finished and Kamehameha summoned his cousin Keoua Kuahu-ula for a peace treaty which resulted in a surrender after losses in the Battle of Hilo and the volcanic eruptions that destroyed many troops. His soldiers were sacrificed to the temple. Today the site is blocked off as there is believede to still be bones buried at the site. Just offshore from the temple is Hale o Kapuni, an underwater structure dedicated to sharks. There is a visitor center on site, as well as an interpretive trail, even though entering the temple itself is not permitted. About 170 feet west of the temple are the ruins of the earlier Mailekini Heiau which was later converted by John Young into a fort to protect the harbor. The site became a National Historic Landmark on October 15, 1966.

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Fish Hoppers, Kona, Big Island, Hawaii


Fish Hoppers, Kona


Fish Hoppers
Kona, Big Island * http://www.fishhopper.com/kona/ * 75-5683 Alii Dr, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii 96740 * 808.326.2002 *
A great little seafood / steak restaurant and bar as you enter into the active strip of downtown Kona. They have good service and some pretty decent dishes. Cocktails are tasty too. Great views of the ocean and a good place to begin your adventure into Kona. Seats by the windows overlook Kailua Bay allowing great visuals of the ocean, beach, and walkways – great for people watching. They carry sustainable seafood from Hawaii as well as fresh seafood flown in weekly from California. They carry a variety from seasonal Dungeness crabs, sand dabs, petrali sole, Alaskan Halibut, Corvena Sea Bass, Wild Salmon, calamari, and other local favorites. They are notorious for their signature “Bucket of Fire” and “Volcano” flaming drinks. The restaurant is within walking distance to many shops and historic sites. The building is a landmark (Ocean View Inn) and a favorite restaurant of the area since 1934. The Fish Hopper is a chain from California run by the Sabu Shake and family. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.


Fish Hoppers, Kona

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Kealakekua Bay Historical Park and Beach


Kealakekua Bay Historical Park across from Captain Cook, Kona

Kealakekua Bay Historical Park and Beach
Kona, Big Island, Hawaii
A great little cove across from the ever-so-famous Captain Cook Cove and diving hotspot on the Kona coast, Big Island, Hawaii. It is located roughly 12 miles south of Kailua-Kona. The area was settled over a thousand years ago so is dotted with ancient temples, archaeological and historical sites serving as a historical district and marine life conservation district. This little park is a great set-in for doing kayaking, scuba diving, and some deeper water reef snorkeling as well as swimming with dolphins. While the dolphins weren’t out when we were snorkeling on this 8th of August in 2009, I’ve heard that it is a popular place to chance the encounters. The parking lot is small and parking is not so easily obtained, but its secluded. There is a small park with picnic tables, restrooms, and a place to relax, with a decent beach and the reefs to explore. Spinner Dolphins are the most common swimmers in the area as they come to the area to rest, feed, and nurse. About 180 acres around the bay is designated as a State Historic Park (1967) and is part of the National Register. The area has a very intriguing history, focusing on the Hikiau Heiau Luakini Temple at the south end of the bay with its burial grounds, the Pali Kapu O Keoua (forbidden cliffs of Keoua) and its associated burials, the village of Ka’awaloa (north end of the bay) where Puhina O Lono Heiau was built with royal residences, and the Kava plant. The name of the Bay comes from “Ke ala ke kua” meaning “The God’s Pathway”. The first European visitors in the area was in 1779 via Captain James Cook and his ships the Resolution and Discovery in January. Later that month he performed the first Christian service on the islands for a crew member that had passed. He was welcomed during January, but his return in February saw conflict. A skirmish took place where Cook was struck in the head and stabbed – leading to his death. Many battles ensued in the area through the years. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.


Coral reef pictures
Kealakekua Bay Historical Park across from Captain Cook, Kona

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Kailua Kona


Kona

Kailua Kona
Big Island, Hawaii
An interesting little resort town on one of the coasts of Big Island, Hawaii. While it doesn’t seem very populated, it is one of the Big Island’s most popular cities as well as one of its largest (census 2000: population 9,870). Its one of the main spots where tourists go for rest, relaxation, and a night life. My visit was a day onwards into the evening … dropping by for a seafood lunch, snorkeling the reefs, lounging in the sun, exploring an old fort, seeing sea turtles, and frolicking around with cocktails meeting some of the locals. I enjoyed the town, but wasn’t impressed with its weekend nightlife offerings. Definitely more low-key than I’m used to. Kona is the center of commerce and tourism in West Hawaii.
The proper name for the area is “Kailua-Kona” (according to the post office to differentiate itself from the larger Kailua on windward Oahu) though most popularly known as “Kona Town” or “Kona”. It houses its own airport and with Hilo make up the air traffic for the island. The area was first established by King Kamehameha I as the homeplace for the government as well as the capital of the newly unified Kingdom of Hawaii. (Capital moved to Lahaina then to Honolulu at later dates) From its inception until the late 1900’s, Kona served primarily as a small fishing village but then overwent a humongous construction boom fueled by tourism and commerce. Kona keeps a pretty warm temperature annually – the coldest month is february with a average high of 82 degrees Fahrenheit an an average low of 67 degrees Fahrenheit. August is the warmest month with an average high of 88 degrees Fahrenheit and an average low of 74 degrees. The area is susceptible to vog (volcanic smoke/fog) from Kilauea. Kona is most popular for its coffee that comes from a variety of Coffea arabica cultivated on the slopes of Mount Hualalai and Mauna Loa. The most popular area of Kona is Ali’i Drive which is Kailua’s oceanfront downtown street beginning at the Kailua Pier towards historic spots southwards including the Ahu’ena Heiau, Kamakahonu royal residence, Hulihe’e Palace, Historic Kona Inn, Mokuaikaua Church, La’aloa Bay, Kahulu’u Bay, and a historic fort.


Big Island

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