Category Archives: Dublin

Leisureplex Starbucks – Blanchardstown Center, Dublin, IE

Starbucks (Leisureplex, Blanchardstown, Dublin, Ireland)

It took some instructing, but they evetually got down to memory the making of Chai Creme Frappacino‘s when we came here to do chai n’ wifi.

To read more about the Starbucks Corporation for history, links, and resources visit here: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2345.

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Starbucks (Swords/Airside Park, Ireland)

Starbucks:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24741. 4 January 2014. Clongriffin to Swords. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Swords: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24171. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754. Malahide: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24123. Clongriffin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24119.
Starbucks: Swords, Ireland. 4 January 2014.

Starbucks – Swords/Airside
Airside Retail Park, Swords, Co. Dublin, Ireland

+353 1 840 8516
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24741

One of my favorite little Starbucks just outside of Swords area of the north Dublin county section of Ireland in the Airside Retail Park. A small glass paneled decorative Starbucks outpost attached to a strip mall with TGI Fridays and InTouch beauty treatments. Friendly service and great Wi-Fi. It was a great stop off after a long day’s hunting of folklore and sacred sites in the area. I had to instruct them how to make a Chai Creme Frappuccino as its less common in Europe than in the Americas. Clean, great yet limited seating, and busy coffee shack. Rated 3.5 stars out of 5.

To read more about the Starbucks Corporation for history, links, and resources visit here: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2345.

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Starbucks (Dawson street, Dublin, Ireland)

Starbucks: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24131. January 2, 2014 - a day out in Dublin. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors -  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Cian - the Prince of Endurance.  Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley,   Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/.  To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754.
Starbucks: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24131. January 2, 2014 – a day out in Dublin. Chronicles 3: Walking with the Ancestors – http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15579. Winter 2013/2014: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Cian – the Prince of Endurance. Photography (c) 2014, 2015: Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the stories and tales visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ and http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. Dublin: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2754.

Starbucks (Dawson street Dublin)
51 Dawson St, Dublin, Ireland * +353 1 675 9850
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24131

My all-time favorite Dublin Starbucks location for chai and Wi-Fi fixes. Nestled just off Dawson, strategically planted near Trinity College and the City Centre, this spacious Starbucks has just what the weary traveler needs – great couches and lounging area in the front, coffee stand and register in the center, with back room and corridor with tables stretching the length of the business. Outside is several tables and chairs for people watching and waiting for the bus during good-weather blessings. The staff is friendly and great at remembering who you are and what you like, internet signal fabulous, and during the middle hours of the week days not too crowded so you’ll often find seating. Evenings and weekends it gets a bit crowded and tough to get seating. They also have the making of the Chai Creme Frappacino down pretty good for a foreign Starbucks. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. Visited 1/2/14.

To read more about the Starbucks Corporation for history, links, and resources visit here: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2345.

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Starbucks (Malahide, Ireland)

Starbucks – Malahide, Ireland
* Unit 2, The Green Strand Street * 60 Marina Village * Malahide * Dublin, Ireland * www.starbucks.ie * 35318283310 *

We were grateful that their was a Starbucks open nearby in Malahide on New Year’s Day, as most of Ireland is shut down on this day. Staff was friendly and courteous, though not really aware of much of the company they work for. We ordered our infamous “Chai Creme Frappuccino” we are so addicted to, only to get the once-in-a-blue-moon newbie employee response “Oh, we don’t make those”. “Of course you do” is always my reply with a quick tutorial on the simplicity and telling them its in their book. It’s on their Frappuccino web site and even the Starbucks-Ireland web site (http://www.starbucks.ie/menu/beverage-list/frappuccino-blended-coffee/chai-creme-frappuccino-blended-beverage). The barista said “We don’t have a book” and “I don’t think that would work” to my tutorial response. But the co-worker went ahead and tried, and voila’ – he had it right on, and strong like we like them. Then out came the Gold Card, which apparently are only offered to Starbucks clientele in the States … but the rewards on them should work universally (which has worked in other Dublin locations) as I had at least 2 free purchases on the card in waiting. “Oh, we can’t check those” with a “I’ll verify with the manager” follow-up saying “no can do”. So we had to use Euros. The one employee said “We are not part of the Starbucks network here in Ireland” which I found a surprising thing to say – “Of course you are” was my reply. I’ve had no problems anywhere else in Ireland with such things and to be a franchise even, you have to be part of the network I’m sure. Overall a good experience minus the novice attentiveness. Kudos to the other employee who was willing to try making the Chai Creme Frappacino. Rating: 3 stars out of 5 ~ visited 1/1/2014

To read more about the Starbucks Corporation for history, links, and resources visit here: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2345.

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~ Tandoori House (Dublin, Ireland)

Tandoori House
* 1 All Saints Park, Raheny, Dublin, Ireland * Open 17:00 – 23:30 * http://www.tandoorihousetakeaway.com/ *

After a long drive across Ireland, we ‘couldn’t be bothered’ about cooking up a meal, so decided to see what we could find online for delivery in our area. We found this little gem with excellent service, fast delivery, delicious food, and affordable selections. Indian food at its finest. Much enjoyed and we were quite satisfied. Rating: 4 out of 5 stars. Experienced 12/20/2013 (Yelp Review)

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Dún Laoghaire, Ireland

Dún Laoghaire
* Ireland *

A suburban sea-side town in Country Dublin that is properly known as Dublin’s Port for it is a central gateway for ferries travelling to Dublin especially since it is only 12 kilometers south of the city centre. Historically it was a major port of entry from Great Britain and therefore from 1821-1921 was called “Kingstown”. The town was named after the 5th century High King of Ireland Lóegaire mac Néill combined with the Irish word for “fort” (Dún) after the fortifications that lined up this coast in the past. The current town dates from 1820 atop an earlier village located around where the Purty Kitchen pub is currently located originally boasting of a coffee shop, a salt mine, and a small cove atop a craggy, rocky pasture overlooking the sea. After the 1807 tragedy of the catastrophic loss of troopships, Prince of Wales, and the Rochdale being driven upon the rocks between here and Blackrock estimating a loss of over 400 lives – a re-vitalization of the area was set into effect making it a new harbour with safer constructs put into place creating the West Pier when it took on the name of Kingstown until Ireland became a free state. By 1844 a “Atmospheric Train” was constructed to connect Kingstown to the Dalkey. A railway later replaced the train connecting Dublin and transforming the area to a seaside resort. After the British 59th Division marched up the road to Dublin to crush the Easter Rising, road changes took place connecting the village to its surrounding area. During World War II, stray German bombs struck the area. Its a popular little village and seaside shopping center frequented by many from Dublin. It is also the main ferry transportation hub from the UK to Dublin directly. Dún Laoghaire was its own borough and was the only town in Ireland to have its own Vocational Educational Committee even though its part of the Greater Dublin region.

Its East Pier is aligned along one of Ireland’s largest harbours and is where the ferry route to the UK is based. The piers are made of granite and is a popular location for people to visit, walk, and contemplate the universe. This was also the setting for the movie “Michael Collins” (1996). This harbour took over 42 years to build. The obelisk at the old ferry port terminal is the monument commemorating this feat.

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Fresh (Dublin)

Fresh

* 1 Crown Alley * Temple Bar * Dublin, Ireland * 2 * phone: (01) 671 8423 * http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fresh-Temple-Bar/ *

One of Dublin’s little hotspots for fashion, club wear, and alternative garb … “Fresh” is in the heart of Temple Bar along Crown Alley, and boasts the best of alternative brands for vintage, punk, gothic, mod, street, rock, metal, and raver clothing, accessories, and fashion. Open from 11-6 mondays through saturdays, and sundays from 1 to 5. Great shop, great selection, and for Dublin, one of its finest. Lots of eye candy in the shop and good offers.

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The Meeting Place Statue, a.k.a. “The Hags with the Bags” (Dublin)

The Meeting Place Statue ~ aka The Hags with the Bags
* Lower Liffey Street * (near Ha’penny Bridge) * Dublin, Ireland *

Just across the Ha’penny Bridge, one will find the statue of two women engaged in conversation with shopping bags at their feet. This one is nicknamed “The Hags with the Bags” but is officially called “The Meeting Place Statue”. On one of the bags is written “Arnotts”. This is located along Lower Liffey Street. It was sculpted by Jakki McKenna in 1988. It was designed to reflect everyday life in Dublin’s marketplace to which it greets people to one of the area’s most popular shopping areas on Henry & Jervis streets, just after one crosses the Ha’penny bridge from Temple Bar.


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Sean O’ Casey Bridge (Dublin, Ireland)

Sean O' Casey Bridge

Sean O’ Casey Bridge
* Dublin, Ireland *

One of the best bridges to view the Jeanie Johnson from … The “Sean O’ Casey” (a.k.a. Droichead Sheáin Uí Chathasaigh) spans the River Liffey approximately 100 meters as a pedestrian swing bridge with two balanced cantilever arms to connect the City Quay to the North Wall Quay in the Grand Canal Docks area and the IFSC. It was built in 2005 by Cyril O’Neill and O’Connor Sutton Cronin Engineers as part of the large urban renewal scheme by the Dublin Docklands Authority to rejuvenate the area. It memorializes Seán O’Casey (1880–1964), a famous Irish playwright and member of the Irish Citizens Army who used to live in the North Wall area.

Sean O' Casey Bridge

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The CHQ Building (Dublin, Ireland)

The CHQ Building

The CHQ Building
* River Liffey * Dublin, Ireland * http://www.chq.ie/ *

A shopping center with future promise, as many of the stores are empty as they stand today. But big names like Starbucks, Louis Copeland and Sons, Fran & Jane, Carphone Warehouse, and Pilates IFSC have set up shop within. Historically the building was known as “Stack A” as a tobacco store with vaults below to store wine and was designed by the infamous engineer Scot John Rennie. It is a protected building under the Planning Acts, steeped with local history, and traditionally known as the “Banquet Hall” as it was used for the Crimean War banquet in the mid-nineteenth century which gave it its popularity.

The CHQ Building

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The Jeanie Johnson Museum Tour (Dublin, Ireland)

Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum

Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum
Dublin, Ireland

Sitting in the Harbour of the River Liffey, just outside the CHQ Building is the replica of the infamous “Jeanie Johnston” ~ the three masted barque built in 1847 by John Munn that brought settlers over to the New World during the great Irish Famine. This replica was completed in 2002 and now sits primarily as a onboard history museum with night activities and events. The replica was designed by former Chief Naval Architect Fred Walker with the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich England. She is originally established as a ocean-going sail training vessel at sea and then in port coverts to a living history museum over the 19th century emigration between Ireland and the Americas. For 8 Euro or less, a guided tour takes you to her upper and lower decks giving a full narrated history of her chronology, feats, and sorrows. The main cabin demonstrates a picturesque view of what life was like onboard with numerous wax figures of her historic passengers. Overall the tour was masterfully done and a wonderful piece of Dublin’s maritime history. A must visit to any Irish tourist. Rating: 5 stars out of 5 by Leaf McGowan

Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum

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The Ferocious Mingle Market (Dublin, Ireland)

The Ferocious Mingle Market
The Ferocious Mingle Market

The Ferocious Mingle Market
* Thursdays to Sundays * 72 Thomas Street * Dublin 8 * Ireland * (086) 0282344 * Hours: Thu-Sun 11:00 – 18:00 * http://www.facebook.com/mingle.mkt * http://www.thejosiebaggleycompany.com/pages/FerociousMingleMarket-info.htm *

A great little odd and bizarre market open every thursday to sunday in the heart of Dublin’s Medieval district. Hidden behind a candy store is a passage back into time, a time of Steampunk visions and vintage affair. Live music sounds out every saturday and sunday with a cafe serving up a mean coffee and cake. Antiques, collectibles, art, vintage fashions, and oddities await. Much of the market takes on a “Steampunk” ambiance and flavor with an assortment of steampunk collections, gifts, and offerings. Every Sunday is fancy dress with costumes galore. After my first visit I was inspired to believe it would soon become a regular hangout! I vended the event once and had a splendid time (even though didn’t make much it was a great event). Every Second sunday it branches out to the Dublin Food Co-op for fancy dress goodness. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. [rating:5] ~ Leaf McGowan: visited 3/4/12, 3/24/12.

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Modern Statue of Queen Maedbh (Dublin)


Modern Statue of Queen Maedbh

* Burlington Road, Dublin, Ireland *

The Modern Statue of Queen Maedbh / Maedhbh / Maeve standing strong and naked while holding a bull’s head. Located on Burlington Road, Dublin, Ireland. Photo take June 6, 2012. The statue was presented in 2004, and sculpted by Patrick O’Reilly. It depicts a modern re-telling of Queen Maeve, representing the power & equality of Celtic women, told by its viewers as a symbol of brutality, kitch, polyandry, and obsession of a power hungry queen. As a ruler of both mortals and the legendary fae, she was a female ruler in Irish History, dominating over western Ireland (Connacht) around the 1st century B.C.E. Strong, powerful, beautiful, and passionate about love and war. She was legendary for her large armies and rumored to have slept with many of her commanders, motivating them for her tasks at hand, and using them at her will. This statue was supposedly created to symbolize this power of her, represented by her large giant fomorian-like stature, naked, with a verocious sexual appetite. Legend has it that she could sleep with over 30 men a day. Her holding the head of a bull in the right hand represents her main myth, the Cattle Raid of Cooley. As her husband owned a bull of superior strength, that outranked her fortune. She couldn’t have that, so as she needed one to compete, she went to war to take the best bull known in Ireland. “The bull of Ulster”. The spear represents her as a warrior, the bird her freedom as well as her enchantment. It is one of Dublin’s little most known statues down a street not often frequented by the public.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews and/or research articles are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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‘Freeflow’ (2006), by Rachel Joynt


* Dublin, Ireland *

Hidden in the walkway from the Jeanie Johnson to the Famine Memorial are embedded internally lit glass cobbles with watery shades of green and blue with artistic shells, fish, and other critters swimming in what she calls “Freeflow”. The art piece was commissioned by the Dublin Docklands Authority in 2006 from Irish sculptor Rachel Joynt and spreads along the North quays for a kilometer from Custom House Quay to the North Wall. She is also the artist known for “Perpetual Motion” (1995), Mothership (1999), and the giant cast bronze/steel sea urchin at Dun Laoghaire.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Little Ass Burrito (Dublin, Ireland)

Little Ass Burrito, Rathgar, Dublin, Ireland
Little Ass Burrito, Rathgar, Dublin, Ireland

Little Ass Burrito
* 32-A Dawson Street (formerly: 1 Upper Rathmines Rd * Dublin, Ireland * 6 * (01) 4062614 * www.littleass.ie * Mon-Thu, Sun 11:00 – 22:00 * Fri-Sat 11:00 – 4:00 *

Billing themselves as “tex mex” this fine restaurant has never disappointed. As I’m more the fan of Mexican fare than “Tex Mex” this fusion stand is one of Dublin’s finest Burrito bars. However, my favorite little burrito stand has moved down to Dawson street, which is sad that its less convenient for me and more convenient for the rest of Dublin. It is also a much smaller and uncomfortable space as it was in Rathmines. (Formerly: (1 Upper Rathmines Rd * Dublin, Ireland * 6) Good thing I do my (c)office often at the Dawson street Starbucks so I could frequent them more often. Same owners, staff, and creative whizzes – the food hasn’t changed if not gotten better. Always a special treat when in Dublin. A place to go out of your way for. Which we did again on December 8th, 2013 while traveling through Dublin. In the former location at 1 Upper Rathmines Road you’d find Little Ass Burrito as A great little hole-in-the-wall, just down the street from the Swan Center and around the corner from Tesco this litte Mexican-fusion Burrito bar. A popular joint amongst the Rathgarians and the Rathminers … it was a great spot to grab a bit especially after pub-crawling, clubbing, or city exploits. Even more so now that it is off Dawson street. In Rathmines, it stood to be a little stand with an eating bar with stools, and a large backroom that wasn’t used. Today its an even smaller hole-in-the-wall, much more like a kiosk – with a couple stools to sit inside, and two tables out front. As a widely expert connoisseur of Mexican fare … its the closest you’ll get to true Mexican taste so far what I’ve found in my exploits of Ireland so far … fusion aside. The Super Batata (Roasted sweet potatoes, pinto beans, jack cheese, sour cream, rice, and coriander) with the Mango salsa is not only to “die for” but extremely addicting. In addition, they support local markets and sources for their ingredients so definitely a plus for this crew. Coffee and beer also readily available. Top 5 stars out of 5. [rating:5] ~ Reviewed Leaf McGowan 3/14/12; 12/8/13

The Super Batata

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Busáras Luggage Storage (Dublin)

Busáras Locker Storage – Dublin
* Busáras * 1 Store Street * Dublin, Ireland *

With terrorism paranoia on the rampage in this world, one of the biggest side effects is the diminishing options for storing your luggage when travelling, especially as a backpacker. (Though internet cafes and hostels pick up some of that slack) Luckily, if you’re a backpacker in Dublin, there is a centrally located locker depot in the Busáras station in the heart of Dublin with decent rates. Its only a few minutes away from O’Connolly Street. Storage lockers are in the basement.

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The Linesman bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus

The Linesman bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus

The Linesman bronze sculpture
* by Dony Mac Manus * Dublin, Ireland *

As the flavor of Dublin is famous for with its statues, sculptures, and artwork … “The Linesman” begs no difference in popularity. This beautiful bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus is classified as a “figurative public sculpture” and is located on the Campshire along the City Quay (N 53° 20.826 W 006° 14.946 / 29U E 683109 N 5914411) being un-veiled in 1999 as a commission by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority from the artist to commemorate the tradition of docking in the area which disappeared after the arrival and containerisation of shipping cargo symbolizing life along the Quays of the River Liffey. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. Review by Leaf McGowan.

The Linesman bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus

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Dublin Docklands

Dublin Docklands

* http://www.ddda.ie/ * Dublin, Ireland *

“Ceantar Dugaí Átha Cliath” is a section of Dublin in the heart of the city centre along both sides of the River Liffey, extending from the Point Depot up to the Talbot Memorial bridge westwards. It is an area of Dublin that at the time of this writing is being re-vitalized and developed. In the center of activities is the historic famine ship – The Jeannie Johnson, The Customs House, The CHQ Center, and the new office buildings for Google. The developments in this area are being labelled the largest and most ambitious urban regeneration project in all of Irish history including new office spaces, retail spaces, waterside apartments, local amenities, a linear park, places set aside for recreation & leisure. Spencer Dock – offices, retail, parkland, and home to the Convention Centre Dublin. Point Village – redevelopment next to the Point Depot, housing a 120 meter tall tower, hotel, shopping center, over 13,000 square meters of office/retail spaces, a three story underground car park, 12 screen cinema, and a “U2 Experience” museum. Grand Canal Dock is being re-developed and home to Alto Vetro, Grand Canal Square, Montevetro, and the Grand Canal Theater. A train station operates from within the Docklands area called Iarnród Éireann. the Red Line Luas to Point Depot saw extension of the C1 here in December 2009 connecting Central Dublin to Connolly Station. Lodging is pretty popular in the Docklands area with giants such as the Gibson Hotel, Clarion Hotel IFSC, and The Grand Canal Hotel. The area is managed by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority that was created by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority Act of 1997 to regenerate Dublin’s East side. This is over 1300 acres being re-developed, and to date has attracted over €3.35 billion of public and private investment with over 40,000 jobs being created because of it.

 

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Custom House of Dublin

Custom House
* Dublin, Ireland *

One of the monumental buildings along the River Liffey’s north bank in the heart of Dublin City is the “Custom House” next to the Dublin Docklands on Custom House Quay between Butt Bridge and Talbot Memorial Bridge. “Teach an Chustaim” is one of the more popular examples of Neo-Classical 18th century architecture in Ireland. It is the current home of the Department of the Environment, Community, and Local Government Offices. Visualized by John Beresfrod, the first commissioner of Revenue in 1780, the Irish architect James Gandon was selected to make it a reality. The Dublin Corporation was against the project as was local merchants who believed it would change the axis of the city centre.
It became a costly building project as first laid out on a swamp, away from the current city centre, and laying of the foundations were disrupted by the High Sheriff and the Dublin Corporation. Ignoring the protests, they plowed ahead with construction. Gandon commissioned many of the available masons and stone cutters in Dublin at the time to complete the project. Notably he worked with the Meath stone cutter Henry Darley, mason John Semple, and carpenter Hugh Henry. They finished the project at a cost of £200,000 by November of 1791. The building majestically displays four facades decorated with coats-of-arms and ornamental sculptures representing Ireland’s rivers. Atop, is Henry Banks’ work on the dome and various supernatural statues. Originally the building was utilized for the collection of custom duties with river traffic into the port of Dublin. As this practice became obsolete, so did the original purpose of the building, and occupation was soon replaced by Irish government offices. The Irish Republican Army burnt down the building during the Irish War of Independence in 1921, destroying most of Gandon’s original interior design and causing the central dome to collapse. This fire destroyed a large amount of irreplaceable historical records for Ireland and in so doing caused a major setback for the IRA as a majority of its volunteers were captured at this point. It was later restored by the Irish Free State Government, and the results of this reconstrucion can be seen on the current building exterior – dome was rebuilt using Irish Ardbraccan limestone that is darker than the original Portland stone, but was done to promote Irish resources. Further restorations took place by the Office of Public Works in the 1980’s.

    Bibliography/Recommended Resources:
  • Craig, Maurice. 1969 “Dublin 1660-1860”.
  • Mackay, James “Michael Collins: A Life”
  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. “Dublin Custom House” Website referenced May 2012.

 

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Viking Splash Tours (Dublin)

Viking Splash Tours

* Meet St. Stephen’s Green * Dublin, Ireland * 2 * (01) 7076000 * http://www.vikingsplash.ie/ * 10 am – 6 pm on Mondays and tuesdays, 9 am until midnight on wednesday to thursdays, 11 am until 11 pm on fridays, and 10 am til 9 pm saturdays and sundays.

A kitchy yet hilarious way to see Dublin, Viking Splash Tours will keep you entertained, intrigued, and laughing. They offer a unique way to see the city the Vikings so much desired in days of old by land and water … They hit the highpoints of Dublin showing patrons the Medieval district, Trinity College, Christ Church, Georgian sector, and the city center. They set you up with viking hats when you board the tacky yellow amphibious bus-boat and away you go on the city tour. They take you through the water and on the streets for an exiting adventure you won’t forget.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Burritos & Blues (Dublin)

Burritos and Blues
* 2 Wexford street * 2 Dublin, Ireland * http://burritos.ie/ * http://www.facebook.com/pages/Burritos-and-Blues/ * Phone +353 14254022 *

As a recent transplant to Dublin, Ireland from America’s Southwest, one of the culinary facets i miss the most from the move is the lack of good Mexican food. But through my wanderings I’ve stumbled upon the trendy explosion of “Burrito bars” in Dublin. Stumbling upon my currently favorite … Little Ass Burrito in Rathgar, we decided to wander about and explore some of the other bars. Next stop was “Burritos & Blues” which was quite tasty, affordable, and entertaining. They indeed had a version of my current favorite addiction of a sweet potato vegetarian burrito that has me quite fixated with Little Ass Burrito. Though so far, Burritos & Blues would be my 2nd favorite burrito bar in the city sofar and their sweet potato burrito is quite tasty. Burritos and Blues has a bit more seating and restaurant flavor, but a “Subway-like” presentation of “fixing your own burrito” as you stand in line and tell them what ingredients and fixin’s you want in your tortilla wrap of goodness. Music is quite good and bouncy, Blues obviously the predominant flavor available, and a wall of posters of events around town to give the nightlife seeker some ideas of where to go. The spicy sauce however is a wallup … best for the Mexican hot conneuseur. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5. [rating:4.5] ~ Reviewed by Leaf McGowan

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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An Irish Life ~ The River Liffey

River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland.
River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland.

The River Liffey

~ Dublin, Ireland

Through he heart of Dublin runs the River Liffey. “Liffey” means “An Life” in Irish. Connecting to the Liffey is the River Dodder, River Poddle, and River Camac. From the Liffey comes most of Dublin’s water supply as well as most of its water recreational activities. It was first named “An Ruirthech” which meant “the fast runner”. “Liphe” was the name of the plain that it ran through, but was later simply absorbed as the River’s name itself going from “Abhainn na Life” to its anglicized version as the “River Liffey”. The River begins in the Liffey Head Bog that rests between the Kippure and Tonduff in the Wicklow Mountains being fed by main springs and streamlets. It flows approximately 78 miles through Dublin, Wicklow, and Kildare counties until it pours out into the Irish Sea where Dublin Bay is located. Networked from the Liffey is a series of smaller streams, rivers, and Canals – these are known as the Ballylow Brook, Brittas River, Athdown Brook, Shankill River, Woodend Brook, Lemonstown Stream, Kilculen Stream, Pinkeen Stream, Painestown River, Rye Water, Griffeen River, Phoenix Park streams, Glenaulin Stream, Creosote Stream, River Camac, Colman’s Brook, Bradoge River, River Poddle, Stein River, River Dodder, River Tolka, and the King’s River.

River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland
River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland

Three hydroelectric reservoirs feed off the Liffey at Poulaphouca, Golden Falls, and Leixlip. The Liffey was the main entranceway into taking of Ireland by the Vikings, used for trade and raids. It is connected to the River Shannon via the Grand Canal and the Royal Canal. Sixty percent of the Liffey’s flow goes for drinking water and utilized by industry, and makes it way back into the Liffey after purification in wastewater treatment plants. The river is also very popular for recreational activities such as fishing, swimming, canoeing, boating, and viewing. The first stone bridge built to cross the Liffey was the “Bridge of Dublin” where the current Fr. Matthew Bridge is now located and was built in 1428 by the Dominicans. It held four arches with numerous buildings such as a bakehouse, an inn, a chapel, and other shops that overall replaced the Dubhghalls wooden bridge that once existed on the same spot. When the 17th century came along, four new bridges were added from 1670-1684 such as the Barrack/Bloody Bridge (Rory O’ More Bridge), Essex or Grattan Bridge, Ormond or O’Donovan Rosssa Bridge, and the Arran bridge. The Oldest was the Mellows or Queens Bridge (1764) along the site of the Arran Bridge that had been destroyed by floods in 1763. The first Iron bridge to be constructed was the Ha’penny Bridge in 1816. The Samuel Beckett Bridge was constructed in 2009 as a suspension bridge with a swivel to allow river traffic through. Along the Northern Bank (west to east) are the Bridgewater, Wolfe Tone, Sarsfield, Ellis, Arran, Inns, Ormond Upper, Ormond Lower, Bachelors Walk, Eden, Custom House, and North Wall Quays. From the Southern bank, (west to east) are the Victoria, Usher’s Island, Usher’s, Merchants, Wood, Essex, Wellington, Crampton, Aston, Burgh, George’s, City, sir John Rogerson’s, and Great Britain Quays.

River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland.
River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland.

    Bibliography/References:
  • Byrne, F.J. 1973 “Irish Kings and High Kings”. Dublin, Ireland.
  • Phillips, M.; Hamilton, A. 2003 “Project History of Dublin’s River Liffey Bridges: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers”. Bridge Engineering 156: Issue BE4.
  • Wikipedia: The Free Online Encyclopedia. “The River Liffey”. Website visited April 2012.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Liffey.

Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum; River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland.
Jeannie Johnson Tall Sailing Ship & Museum; River Liffey, Dublin, Ireland.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Cirque Du Soleil’s “Alegría” (Dublin, Ireland) ~ April 25-29, 2012

Allegria - Cirque du soleil
Allegria - Cirque du soleil

Allegria – Cirque du soleil
– April 25-29, 2012. Dublin, Ireland * http://www.cirquedusoleil.com/en/shows/alegria/show/about.aspx.

Coming soon to Dublin is the world infamous monumental “Cirque Du Soleil” with their astonishing troupe and show “Alegría”. It’s a mood and a state of mind after which the show is named. Coming from the Spanish term for “jubilation” the troupe will show power and the handing down of it through time with artistic demonstrations of the evolution of ancient monarchies to modern democracies, old age, youth, and the cycles of time. With the King’s fools, minstrels, beggars, old aristocrats, and children making up the show’s universe speckled with clowns, they come again to stun their audiences. I’ve been fortunate to experience this amazing show of acrobats, music, performance, arts, stilt-walking, fire art, juggling, comedy, clowning, and breathe death-defying feats. Mesmerized by the costumes, stage design, arts, illusions, super-human body twisting and endurance … I’ve been addicted to the Cirque since I first saw them in the early 1990’s at their home arena in Quebec. Definitely a not to miss show when they come to town. Unfortunately we don’t have the funds to see this show while it hits Dublin this year, but for those that can afford it, definitely go out for a time of your life. You will not only be amazed and whirl-winded, but tingled to sheer ecstasy. If for some reason we do find a way to go via winning tickets or being gifted with them, we’ll definitely add on to this review with a stunning report. ~ Tom Baurley

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Steampunk Art & Performance Snippets from Dublin’s St Patricks Day Parade 2012

The Saturday March 17, 2012 St. Patrick’s Day Festival and Parade in Dublin, Ireland. Video clips of various Steampunk themed art and floats presented in the Parade.

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The Ghost Bikes of Dublin

Ghost Bikes of Dublin

* All around Dublin, Ireland (& the world) * http://ghostbikes.org/dublin *

An art project? A found art piece? memorial?

Its a memorial to a lost bicyclist who was hit or killed on the street. They are placed locked to a crash site with a small plaque and painted in white to serve as reminders of the horrors that bicyclists have faced and dealt with on their commutes or pleasure rides in the streets of the world. I came across them for the first time in Dublin, but they are a worldwide phenomena, first appearing in 2003 along the streets of St. Louis, Missouri. Now there are reported to be over 500 of them in over 180 locations around the world. The web site tells all. The site is setup to inform those about what this project is about, how to set up a ghost bike memorial, and the safety concerns with this issue. The Dublin project began in 2009 with the first ghost bike to Zu Zhang Wong organised by the Dublin Cycling Campaign (DCC). They reported that 11 cyclists died in Dublin from 2002-2006, seventy five percent from left hand turning lorries.

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St. Kev’s Boys National School of Blackpitts, Dublin, Ireland

Saint Kevin's Male National School, Dublin, Ireland
Saint Kevin's Male National School, Dublin, Ireland

St. Kevin’s Male National School *Scholar’s *
* Donovan Lane & Blackpitts * 24 Blackpitts Road * Blackpitts * Dublin * Ireland *

The former location to St. Kevin’s Boys National School. The current St Kevin’s Boys National School, is a all boys school in Dublin, now located in Finglas West, north Dublin, Ireland with over 300 students rangin in age 4 to 12 and as far as I can tell, has no direct relationship to this former school except the name. This former location is now in ghostly ruins, decaying away as part of Dublin’s history. Tales of this old school were once logged on Google cached Dublin.ie forums speaking of cold, dark, and dreary days of a poorly run school with a very bitter staff. Not much resides on the web about the history of this old school. Its location in Blackpitts is built upon grounds where the black death plague victims were buried (not necessarily exactly where the building now sits). This building was built in 1895 by George Coppinger Ashlin, for the St. Kevin’s Male National Schools in County Dublin, Dublin, in the Blackpitts neighborhood. At one point in its history, it was turned into a drinking pub. It appears from my passing by it the other day to be back in ruins. I’ll post more information as I find it, anyone with information about this building please send data to reviews@technogypsie.com. Thanks greatly!

Saint Kevin's Male National School, Dublin, Ireland
Saint Kevin's Male National School, Dublin, Ireland
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LaTouche Bridge, Dublin, Ireland

LaTouche Bridge
LaTouche Bridge, Rathgar/Rathmines, Dublin, Ireland

LaTouche Bridge
* Bridge R114 * Lower Rathmines Road/ Richmond Street South / Grand Canal, Portabello, Dublin, Ireland *

This bridge was the first intriguing crossing to catch my attention during my life in Dublin. It is a small cross-over bridge (and lock) with Rathmines street above and the Grand Canal below (offshoot from the Libbey). As I was walking over it one evening, I spied a “Troll Below” graffitti stenciled on the sidewalk just above the bridge. My next crossing i peered under, and there was a police boat docked beneath the bridge. Off to the right was a red graffitti painted of Cernunnos or an Antler-God with Ogham script that I have still yet to decipher. But nonetheless, these elements struck a cord in my curiousity enough to photograph and investigate the bridge further. The Bridge was built in 1791 and named after William Digges La Touche (1747-1803), a popular Director of the Grand Canal Company as well as prominent Irish businessman in his time. Steel parts of the bridge was replaced in 2004. It is also nicknamed the Portobello Bridge for it is right under the Portobello school in the Portobello district. The Portobello district of Dublin, just like its counterpart in London, was named after the capture of Porobelo, Colón on Panama’s Caribbean Coast by Admiral Vernon in 1739. This district encompasses the stretch of the Grand Canal from the Robert Emmet Bridge (Clanbrassil Street) to South Richmond Street to Rathmines. In 1861 this bridge experienced a horrible tragedy when Patrick Hardy was driving a horse-drawn bus up the steep incline and one of the horses reared, became uncontrollable, backing the bus through the wooden rails of the bridge, causing the bus, 6 passengers, and the horses to be plunged to their deaths in the deep (20 feet) dark cold waters of the canal lock. The conductor was saved by a passing policeman, but the rest were drowned. One of the passengers was the father of the Gunne brothers who opened the Gaiety Theater, there were two mothers each with a little girl, one of which was the niece of Daniel O’Connell. On the night of the accident’s anniversary, it is reported that a brilliant light is seen to rise from the canal water and turn into a human shape which is known as the ghost of a lock-keeper who drowned himself after being sacked for drunkenness was to blame for the tragedy. Some say this same ghost arose when the horse drawn bus was crossing the bridge, thereby spooking the horses. During the 1916 Easter Rising, the Irish Citizen Army had a group of men seizing a delaying position at this bridge to allow fortifications to be constructed in the city center. The group was led by the non-author James Joyce and made into a military outpost. But once his unit burst in where he worked at Davy’s bar near the bridge, he was sacked. This was also the location for the murder of Sheehy-Skeffington the same year. As members of the British 11th East Surrey Regiment arrest Francis Sheehy-Skeffington here on April 25th with no reason while he was returning to his home in Rathmines. He was taken to the Portobello barracks and held as an enemy sympathizer. Later that evening, he was taken out as a hostage with a raiding party led by Captain J.C. Bowen-Colthurst of the Royal Irish Rifles to the home and shop of Alderman James Kelly at the corner of Camden Street and Harcourt Road, where they bombed the shop with grenades. On their way back to Rathmines, Skeffington was witnessed to two murders committed by Bowen-Colthurst and his party on two unarmed civilians including a 17 year old boy returning from church. Both the former Kelly’s tobcacconist and Sheehy-Skeffington was taken and the following morning shot by a firing party along with two pro-British journalists – Thomas Dixon and Patrick McIntyre who were unlucky enough to have been in Kelly’s shop when it was grenaded. The three were shot in the back and the British authorities kept the killing a secret.

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Dominion (Dublin, Ireland)

Dominion Resurrection
* Cellar of Murrays Bar * 33-34 O’Connell Street, Dublin 1, Ireland *
Every Saturday from 9.30 pm – 2.30 am in the cellar of the sports bar called “Murrays” is Ireland’s premiere and only Goth night. Only €3 until 11, afterwards €6 to enter. Darksome and divine, this small little hole is comfortable and roomie for those interested in the sub-culture to gather and dance their night away. I was quite curious how the Goth scene would be in Ireland and was quite pleased to hear some great music. The music was diverse from 80’s to electronic, goth, industrial, to medieval. The particular night I visited on July 3, 2010 – DJ’s Conor, Ozzy aka David Osborn, and Beo aka Christoph Heimann were playing. Good times. Good tunes. However, it was under-attended. There was about a dozen there and they all knew one another. It would appear a bit cliche’ish to those who are shy as I am (until I get to know people I’m actually a shy wallflower) so I’m just as guilty for not having made an attempt to make friends. Having to be at the airport at 4 am, I decided to call it an early night. But I’ll be back. Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.

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Hellfire Club Dublin

Hellfire Club Tour – Dublin, Ireland
* http://www.hiddendublinwalks.com/ghost-tour-dublin.php

I really wanted to experience this ghost tour – but unfortunately Hidden Dublin Walks cancelled the tour sometime between me waiting at the Brazenhead and the 20 minutes it took for a representative to show up to tell me it was cancelled. So its on my list of things to do for my next visit to Dublin in 2011. For €22 the Hidden Dublin Walks will bus you out to the infamous ruins of the Hellfire Club and tell you haunted tales. They do the tour every thursday at 7 pm meeting outside the Brazenhead tavern at 20 Lower Bridge Street in Dublin. However, best to book online or make reservations for if they don’t have enough attending, they won’t do the tour. The also offer private larger group excursions upon reservation request. On the dark road to the Hellfire Club they will tell more legends and lore, ghostly tales, and stories about St Patrick’s Cathedral, Rathfarnham Castle and Kilakee House as well as the dark Dublin Mountains range that you will be entering. A walking tour through the haunted hunting lodge that dates to 1725 C.E. that is a rumored location for Satanic rites, supernatural tales, and Occult practices. The storyteller tells the tale of its history, the destruction of ancient megalithic monuments on the site, the exhumation of the demonic statue and dwarf statue as well as the presumed evil rituals, events, and black masses, rumored human and animal sacrifices, and the infamous card game called “cloven-hoofed visitor”. Travel time and tour takes about 2 and a half hours.

The Legendary Hellfire Club a.k.a. Club Thine Ifrinn is a ruin located on Montpelier Hill that stands about 383 metres high in County Dublin, Ireland. The building is an Palladian architecture designed old hunting lodge built in 1725 by William Conolly, a Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. Conolly purchased Mountpelier Hill from Philip the Duke of Wharton, the founder of the first Hellfire Club in 1719. The upper floor consists of a hall and two reception rooms, on the east side was a third timber-floored level with sleeping quarters. The Ground floor hosts a kitchen, servant’s quarters, and the stairs to the upper floors. The house had a semi-circular courtyard enclosed by a low stone wall and entered by a gate. Originally on this summit was a cairn with a prehistoric passage grave that was desecrated and used to construct the hunting lodge formerly called “Mount Pelier Lodge”. A standing stone that was on the hill was used for the lintel over the fireplace. Shortly after its completion, a storm blew off the roof, which locals blamed was the work of the Devil as punishmen for destroying the cairn/passage tomb. Conolly rebuilt the roof which remains today. Connoly died in 1729. The Connolly Family let the lodge to the Hellfire Club. Members of the Irish Hell Fire Club, an elite social group of occultists, have been said to actively used the lodge as their meeting place from 1735-1741. Rumors and local imaginations ran amiss claiming wild parties, debauchery, occult practices, human/animal sacrifices, Satanic rites, and demon manifestations took place at the location. No accounts of how much the Hellfire club actually used the estate as it was pretty remote. Many publications such as Robert Chamber’s Book of Days (1864) and the Gentleman’s Magazines (1731-1922) states there was heavy use of the estate by the Club. The lodge was damaged by fire so the members of the Hellfire Club relocated down the hill to the nearby Steward’s House which is also rumored to be haunted by a massive black cat. Today Montpelier Hill and much of the surrounding lands are owned by the State forestry company Coillte and are open to the public.

The Hellfire Clubs internationally were the name for several exclusive clubs of high society rakes that were established in Britain and Ireland in the 18th century. These were related to the “Order of the Friars of St. Francis of Wycombe”. Supposedly these clubs were the meeting places of “persons of quality” who wished to take part of immoral acts. Most of the members were politicians. The very first Hellfire club was founded in London in 1719 by Philip Duke of Wharton. The Club motto went with the philosophy of “Fais ce que tu voudras” (Do what thou wilt) – a philosophy of life associated with François Rabelais’ fictional abbey at Thélème and later used by Aleister Crowley. Practices were believed to be rigorously Pagan with Bacchus and Venus as the Deities of honor who were legendarily sacrificed to while nymphs and hogsheads were laid in against he festivals of the new church. The Irish Hellfire Club was founded in 1735 by Richard Parsons, the 1st Earl of Rosse and Colonel St. Leger. The president of the club was Richard Chappell Whaley, a descendant of Oliver Cromwell and was known as “Burn Chapel” Whaley since he had the thirst for setting fires to Catholic churches. Most of their meetings took place either at the Eagle Tavern on Cork Hill near Dublin Castle or at Daly’s Club on College Green. Legend has it that the members drank “saltheen” – a mixture of whiskey and hot butter and that they left a chair vacant at each meeting for the Devil. Their mascot was supposedly a big black cat. One of the legends is of a stranger who arrived at the Club on a stormy night. He was invited in and joined the members in a card game. One player dropped his card on the floor and when he bent down under the table to retrieve the card he noticed the stranger had a cloven foot. Shortly after the visitor disappeared in a ball of flame. Another tale tells of a priest who came to the house one night and found the members engaged in the sacrifice of a black cat. Supposedly the priest grabbed the cat and uttered an exorcism upon which a demon was released from the cat’s corpse. Another tale tells of Simon Luttrell, the Lord Irnham later Earl of Carhampton and once Sheriff of Dublin has supposedly made a pact with the Devil to give up his soul within seven years in return for settling his debts, but when the Devil came to the Hellfire Club to claim his due, Luttrell distracted the Devil and fled. Luttrell is also the man referred to as “The Diaboliad” in a 1777 C.E. poem dedicated to the “Worst Man in England”. Another legend states there was a sacrifice of a dwarf on this site. The Hellfire Club was revived in 1771 and active for another 30 years and called “The Holy Fathers”. They too supposedly met at Mount Pelier Lodge. One legend has it the members kidnapped, murdered, and ate a nearby farmer’s daughter. At this time its most notorious member was Thomas Buck Whaley the son of Richard Chappell Whaley. When he passed away in 1800, the Irish Hellfire Club supposedly died with him. Supposedly in 1970 a dwarf human skeleton was found below the floor of Killakee House, another location for Hellfire Club meetings.

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The Pale Pub


The Pale
* 13 High Street * Dublin 2 * Dublin, Ireland * (01) 6773207 * www.thepalepub.com *

A pit stop ino this two-story pub in the heart if the Medieval district for some traditional Irish pub fare. The staff is very friendly, the pub spacious, and for an afternoon/early evening not too crowded on a weekday. The main bartender was quite witty. Some say he’s kissed the Blarney Stone. I sat atop upstairs. Upstairs its decorated like a sportsbar which is not so much of my preference but that was fine. Food was good and service great. Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.

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