Category Archives: Restaurants

Reviews and tales about various restaurants on our journeys.

Starbucks – Benson Hills; Renton, Washington

17901 108th Ave SE, Renton, WA 98055 ~ Phone: (425) 235-7948 ~ Starbucks web site ~

This has become one of my favorite Starbucks in the Renton Washington area. Staff is always friendly and hospitable, quick to assist and meet customer’s needs. WiFi is great as well as seating. No code locks on the bathrooms so one less hassle to deal with. Parking lot with ample spaces, next to the Fred Meyer’s so a quick in-and-out. Rating: 5 stars out of 5 Visited: 1/28/19, 1/29/19, 1/30/19. More info about Starbucks: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2345.

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Starbucks – SeaTac – D Wing

Starbucks

SeaTac International Airport – D Wing, Seattle, Washington

A nice little booth servicing the new D Gates Wing for D21-D26 Gates. After a bad experience waiting in line for Anthony’s Fish Restaurant I decided to give my money to Starbucks instead at my gate. I got in line, the cashier fumbled adding money to my Starbucks card, but friendly and sweet apologized. I grabbed my sandwiches for the flight (which were over-priced compared to usual Starbucks) and awaited my Chai Creme Frappacino. Another newbie Barista, didn’t know how to make them, and stumbled to get it right. She was friendly and nice as well, apologized, and had great customer service. That makes it alright, you know. Got my order and everything perfectly. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Anthony’s Fish Restaurant – SEATAC

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport – SEA
17801 International Blvd

Seattle, WA 98158
Phone number: (206) 431-3000 ~ www.anthonys.com
~

Just in – 1/30/19 at 11:40 am – SeaTac airport, was hoping for some last fresh seafood before leaving Seattle for Denver, and I walk up to the concierge for seating, she ignores me, and attends to the gentleman behind me. I then interrupt, she says “go seat yourself” and points to the interior. Okay, so I do, looking for seating and then ask a friendly cooking staff and she says – oh no, you have to go up front and put your name on the list. So I do, and ask if its going to be a long wait, (new concierge) and she’s un-excited, depressed, and blah – it’ll be a few minutes (plenty of open tables). I moved on. Bad customer service. Looked nice, but hey we’ve got flights to catch. Otherwise the restaurant looks nice, offerings look tasty, and it looked like a nice place to wait for one’s flight. Guess I’ll never know, as I have not a chance to t try them out all due to poor personnel. Unlikely I’ll be going out of my way to review this restaurant again. Rating: 2 stars out of 5. Review on Yelp here.

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Dick’s Drive-In

Dick’s Drive-In

~ Seattle Washington based chain ~

The infamous iconic Seattle-based fast food burger joint / drive-in, Dick’s is a major Seattle attraction. It was founded by Dick Spady, H. Warren Ghormley, and Dr. B.O.A. Thomas in 1954 within the Wallingford neighborhood on N.E. 45th street. A second one was opened in Capital Hill during 1955. In 1960 one was opened in Crown Hill, followed by one in Lake City in 1963, and a fifth in Queen Anne 1974. They opened a sixth location in Edmonds off 220th street and Hwy 99 in 2011. They opened a 8th location in December 2018 in Kent, Washington off Highway 99. There is no customer seating available at any of the locations except the Queen Anne which has indoor tables but no drive-in.

They boast a simple low-cost menu that gives them their fame – fast food staples such as hamburgers, hand-cut french fries, and hand-made milk shakes. They are notable for the “Dick’s Deluxe” which includes the burger, lettuce, mayonnaise, and chopped pickles. They don’t allow substitutions and all burgers are cooked to well done. They have been cited as being really good to their employees, even offering them matched 401(k), 100% employer-paid medical, and a $22,000 college tuition scholarship after 6 months of employment. They were voted the “most life-changing burger joint in America” in 2013 Esquire.com.

As much as I desire to quit fast food, this is one staple in Seattle I often still visit as the food is affordable and tasty. Most locations are quite busy and always involve a line-up and obscene traffic. The wait is worth it though in most instances. The shakes are to die for. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5 Fast Food – Low.

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Jack in the Box

~ National Chain, the Americas ~
FAST FOOD – Medium

One of the top fast food restaurants in America, Jack in the Box was founded in February of 1951 by Robert O. Peterson in San Diego, California. Today they have over 2,200 locations mainly on the West Coast of the United States. They can also be found in the central states with popularity in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Tennessee, the Carolinas, and Ohio. They also operated the Qdoba Mexican Grill until 2017 when the Apollo Global Management took over Qdoba. They offer a variety of selections from burgers, chicken tenders, tacos, and egg rolls. They took on a circus-like decor around a starry-eyed clown in the 1940s. It took on its current iconography in 1951 wrapped around the then popular drive-thru intercom technology. A Giant clown projected from the roof and a smaller clown head sat atop the intercom saying “Pull forward Jack will speak to you.” Peterson created a holding company for it called Foodmaker Inc managing the popular chain. Foodmaker was sold to Ralston Purina Company in 1968 and it became the most prolific growth television commercial based fast food giant in the 1970’s. They hit some struggles afterwards trying to expand to the Eastern coast, and in the 80’s made a marketing strategy “The Food is better at the Box” competing with its competitors not for the kids of McDonald’s but the affluent yuppie customers with a higher quality more upscale menu. They flashed their ads with the Jumbo Jack, seasoned Curly Fries, salads, and diverse menu. Ralston Purina sold Foodmaker in 1985 to management and became a publicly traded company with over $655 million in sales by 1987. There is an array of food types and selections, a quick fast food fix to the hungry palate. But it is fast food still none-the-less and carries the unhealthy characteristics of junk food.

Rating: 3 stars out of 5

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Pho World

17823 108th Ave SE, Renton, WA 98055 : Phone: (425) 254-3555

They bill themselves as a basic no-frills Pho restaurant offering Vietnamese soups with meat and vegetables also offering rice dishes and noodles.

I have yet to dine at and visit this restaurant for a proper review. I’ve only done deliveries for them through outside companies and have observed it is a favorite location amongst delivery enthusiasts.

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Lunch Box Laboratory

Lunch Box Laboratory

Seattle, Washington and surrounding region

http://www.lunchboxlab.com/

I have yet to try out this establishment. I have only observed the restaurant from doing deliveries for them through partner companies. The company was created in 2011 by John Schmidt’s Neighborhood Grills and Arnold Shain. The first location was in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood offering experimental cuisine and a full bar with ecclectic cocktails. They took on a 80’s imagery with classic 80’s arcade games, outdoor seating, and expansions of their lunchbox menu. They became popular from the “As Seen on TV Dork Burger”, “Burger of the Gods”, “Astronaut’s Manmosa, “Buffalo Chicken Roll Ups”, “Classic Merican Mac and Cheese”, “Drunken Elvis” liquor infused shake.

Rating: Unrated – Yet to be rated

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Sizzle Pie

Sizzle Pie
National Chain Restaurant – USA

A great Pizza chain with locations around America that offers various Pizza pies and Italian treats, most notable for its Vegan Pizza Pies and Draft Beer. They host music and late-night hours. I’ve only experienced the Union Street location in Seattle after clubbing and found their pizza divine. They are also available for home delivery through seamless, postmates, trycavair, and GrubHub. They boast their principle that Pizza is for everyone and work hard to making a selection for everyone’s dietary preferences from vegan, meat, and veggies. Sizzle Pie was founded by Matt Jacobson and Mikey McKennedy off East Burnside street in 2011 as a never-ending pizza party where everyone is welcome. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5

Locations visited:

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  • Sizzle Pie, 1009 E Union St, Seattle, WA 98122 : Phone: (206) 325-7437 Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5

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Mazatlan Family Mexican Restaurant

Matzatlan Family Mexican Restaurant
~ 828 NE Hwy 101, Lincoln City, Oregon 97361 * 541-996-6090 * http://www.mazatlan.rest/ ~

A great family restaurant located off of Highway 101 – family run, family owned for over 25 years with a tradition of recipes and delights. We enjoyed our visit and myself the Chimichanga and enchiladas were great. I can’t remember if they had Sopapillas, as there was somewhere along the Oregon Coast I had the most delightful. Good times.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Country Buffet

Country Buffet
~ chain across the United States ~

Old Country Buffet has approximately 168 locations throughout the United States under the names of Country Buffet or Home Town Buffet. The mascot for the restaurants is the “O.C. Bee”. The restaurant chain is part of Ovation Brands, Inc. based in Texas as a subsidiary of Food Management Partners, Inc. They offer a steak-buffet, grilled-to-order steaks, single-serve dishes, scratch-made soups, entrees and desserts, beverage bars, buffets, chops and grilled seafood, international foods, and others. They can be found as Old Country Buffet, Country Buffet, HomeTown Buffet and Ryan’s Buffet.

I’ve visited many of these restaurants around the United States and they do not have many differences and their course selections are quite contrary the same. I’m a big fan of buffets, and this is mediocre yet tasty. Good prices for kids but a little higher end for adults. The selection is magnificent but it is your run of the mill home cooked selections with some international specialties to spice things up. Desserts are probably the better selections. Quick, fast, and will fill up your appetite.

Rated: 3 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Dinner with the family at Country Buffet – Tales of a Delivery Driver: Chronicle 278- Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken August 2, 2018. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=39039. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2018. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051

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Il Vicino Wood Oven Pizza

Il Vicino Wood Oven Pizza
~ Colorado Springs, Colorado * https://ilvicino.com/ ~

I have made numerous deliveries for this establishment in Colorado Springs and Denver. Every customer that received their orders were excited and almost drooling with anticipation to dig in, so I gather the food is spectacular. It smells it. I like the smell it leaves in my car and that’s usually not the case after a delivery. The staff is super friendly, attentive, and quick. They take special care to make sure the food looks perfect. I look forward to dining here someday. Rick Post, Tom White, and Greg Atkin are the founding three who built this mini empire that boasts 8 restaurants that can be found in Colorado, New Mexico, and Kansas. They blended together concepts from famous San Francisco hotspots with traditional wood-fire ovens that was learned from visiting traditional pizzerias in Italy with the highest quality ingredients in a casual upscale atmosphere.

They opened their first location in the infamous Nob Hill district of Albuquerque in 1992 and from there it was a whirlwind of growth.

Rated: UNRATED of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been visited and reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Red Gravy (Colorado Springs)

Red Gravy
~ 23 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 * http://redgravyco.com/ ~

I have yet to visit this wonderful artsy and comfortable restaurant for a dine-in, though have been through the doors many times for deliveries. Every customer i’ve delivered to are dedicated patrons, always enthusiastic about receiving the delivery. Obviously that tops the list for a visit some day when the finances are flowing as it is a littler higher end than my usual options of my own wallet’s accord. The staff is extremely friendly, prompt, and attentive. Dining ambiance appears relaxed and appetizing. Deemed an Italian kitchen, the menu selection for brunch, lunch, and dinner looks addictive – there is not an item on the menu i wouldn’t be interested in. I tried to find some history about the restaurant but the web site lacks an about us page.

Rated: unrated of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been rated. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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East Coast Deli and Restaurant (Colorado Springs)

East Coast Deli and Restaurant
~ 24 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~ http://eastcoastdeli.net/

Right in the heart of downtown Colorado Springs is this nice quaint eatery that gives the feel of a NYC delicatessan offering soups, salads, deli sandwiches, burgers, lunch, and breakfast. They pride themselves as a New York Style Delicatessen & Restaurant. The owners Chris and Laura are from Long Island, N.Y. and have owned restaurants in New York, Las Vegas, and now Colorado Springs. Products and ingredients are shipped directly from New York and bake their breads in shop daily. Their soups are made from scratch and they roast their own meats and are open 7 days a week for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Rated: UNRATED of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Qdoba Mexican Eats

Qdoba Mexican Eats

A international fast food medium-range chain that can be found throughout the United States, Canada, and Mexico. In 2003 it became a subsidiary of Jack-In-The-Box. In 2017 it was purchased by Apollo Global Management for 305 million dollars having over 700 restaurants in over 47 states, Canada, and Mexico. It began as Zuma Fresh Mexican Grill in 1995 being founded by Anthony Miller and partner Robert Hauser in Denver, Colorado. They focused on Mexican cuisine using healthier preparation methods, fresh vegetables, herbs, and vegetable oils instead of traditional animal fats. They changed their name to Qdoba in 1999 to avoid lawsuits from companies claiming infringement on the Zuma and Z-teca names.

The food is grand and delicious with the right amount of herbs and spices. I’ve enjoyed the bowls and burritos, chips, salsas, and drinks. It’s a satisfying experience.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Spiced Island Grill (Colorado Springs)

Spiced Island Grill
~ 10 N Sierra Madre St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~

A delicious treat of Jamaican food and spiced island gourmet that has a top rating in Colorado Springs. A little off-map location down by the park and railroad in downtown Colorado Springs. The restaurant began 20 years ago by owners Claudette and Glenroy Hutchinson vending at fairs, street markets, and festivals throughout the country from New England to Cambridge England, they travelled all over. The restaurant has a hide-a-way feel, nestled out of the city bustle yet in a downtown setting. It is believed by the owners that the building they occupy used to be a brothel that served gold miners and railroad workers in days past. The history is not documented, some shoes of brothel style were found in the crawlspace, and the building is called “El Tesoro” meaning “the treasure” of Sierra Madre Street. The building was converted into an adobe style restaurant in 1991.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Blank Canvas Cafe (Colorado Springs)

Blank Canvas Cafe
~ 103 S Wahsatch Ave #106, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~

A great little hole-in-the-wall restaurant and cafe off of Wahsatch avenue in downtown Colorado Springs. It appears to be a popular hangout and has great reviews. I unfortunately have not yet tried it out. They offer a unique assortment of teas, pastries, salads, paninis, sandwiches, and locally roasted coffee. They offer an artistic space for local artists and hand-made creations from the Studio as well as poetry readings, open mic night, comedy, music, and entertainment. The cafe is the vision of Dream Catchers and funded by Ariel Clinical Services.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Chocolate Love Temple, Glastonbury, England


Chocolate love temple, Glastonbury, England

Chocolate Love Temple, 86 High St, Glastonbury, England BA6 9DZ, UK Phone: +44 1458 835479

A great little delicious shop in the heart of Glastonbury I discovered during my backpacking tour of 2011. Its intriguing, alternative, and ecstatic … the chocolatier within calls themselves alchemist artisans who focus on raw chocolate as a healing medicine. Offered is a variety of chocolates, cakes, treats, medicinal mushrooms, love drops, supplements, and super foods like bee pollen. A must drop-in for any chocolate enthusiast.

Rated: 4.5 of 5 stars. Visited 8/1/2011. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Mission Inn (Riverside, CA)

Historic Mission Inn
~ Riverside, California ~

Along Highway 395 and the Riverside Downtown/Street Mall is the Mission Inn Hotel and Spa one of Riverside’s most notable Historic Landmarks. It boasts numerous architectural styles but is considered the largest Mission Revival Style Building in the United States. It is currently owned by Duane and Kelly Roberts. Originally it began as a Adobe style boarding house called the “Glenwood Cottage” built by engineer Christopher Columbus Miller on November 22, 1876. The Hotel was purchased by their son in February 1880 and created a full-service hotel by the early 1900’s taking advantage of the Citrus boom, warm weather, and wealthy travelers coming to the area from the East Coast and Europe. In 1902 it was re-named “Glenwood Mission Inn” and that was when various architectural styles were incorporated into its style based on Miller’s vision for eclectic structure drawn from various revivals, influences, and styles including Spanish Gothic, Mission Revival Style, Moorish Revival, Spanish Colonial Style, Spanish Colonial Revival, Renaissance Revival, and Mediterranean Revival Style. The hotel is complicated and intricately built with narrow passageways, exterior arcades, a medieval style clock, a five story rotunda, patios, windows, castle towers, minareets, a Cloister Wing with catacombs, flying buttresses, Mediterranean domes, and a pedestrian sky bridge. Miller was also a world explorer and over thirty years of ownership brought back treasures from around the world to add into the hotel.

The St. Francis Chapel has four large stained glass windows and two original mosaics created by Louis Comfort Tiffany in 1906 that were salvaged from the Madison Square Presbyterian Church. The “Rayas Altar” is in Mexican Baroque style sitting 25 feet tall x 16 feet width made of cedar and covered in gold leaf. There is a Garden of Bells with over 800 bells from all over the world including one dating to 1247. In 1932 he opened the St. Francis Atrio hosting the “Famous Fliers Walls” commemorating notable aviators including Amelia Earheart. Today it has 151 fliers honored on the wall.

After Frank died in 1935 the Inn was run by his daughter and her husband Allis and Dewitt Hutchings. They died in 1956 and from thence forward saw various ownership changes including some of the rooms converted to apartments and used for dorms at UC Riverside. It was almost purchased from St. John’s College for a western campus but lost the bid when John Gaw Meem donated them land in Santa Fe. It was then acquired by the Carley Capital Group and saw massive renovations in 1985. In December 1992 it was sold to Duane Roberts who completed the renovations and reopened it to the public. Today it offers a hotel, spa, outdoor pool, museum, and fine dining. They now host annually a Festival of lights, Pumpkin stroll, and Ghost walks.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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To Tip or Not To Tip: That is the question – Tipping

To Tip or Not To Tip – That is the Question of the Day

by Leaf McGowan / Technogypsie Productions

I’ve always been on the border about “tips”, “gratuity”, and “tipping”. I never in my younger years saw it as “required”, “mandatory”, or “expected”. Even when i was a bartender I never expected it nor thought I should get it. After all I was just doing my job and I was paid a fare wage for it. It was nice to get a tip when it happened (and it happened often), i just saw it as a “hey thanks for doing an exceptional job”. Its true I was brainwashed by regulars to recognize them as good tippers and pouring extra liquor or giving them extra attention because I knew they tipped. But I was fair to all. I always saw it as a practice to thank a worker for being extra nice, going out of their way, or high performance. I wouldn’t tip someone who did a poor job. But these days, you’re expected if not required to tip a service worker regardless of doing a good job. The percentages have raised from the normal 10% to 15% to 18% and 20% in some cases. Really? That’s not only obnoxious, but criminal. The criminality of tipping, no tipping, less than minimum wages, etc. didn’t sink in until I became a delivery driver and experienced first hand the angst and stress than a customer who doesn’t tip causes a worker … especially when it affects their livlihood, wear and tear on their vehicle, or when that tip teeters the ability to cover the gas it took to deliver said food.

When my ex-family member became rapid about no tippers as she works in the food industry, it was definitely a flag seeing how hostile she got on the topic. It was definitely a clash between us. I tried to explain to her my thoughts about it, how it was meant as a gift for exceptional service, and that it should never be expected. In fact, many countries find the act offensive and many foreigners don’t do it. She shouldn’t get hostile on a bunch of Germans at her table who don’t tip her. They might not know the American custom or requirement. But she would just get seething angry. It was that seething anger and dishonesty in her persona that made her my ex-family member in the long run.

But she’s no different than many in the service industry – if you don’t tip or are a poor tipper, you can easily become the scum at the bottom of a barrel and seen as a disgusting, unappreciative, vile individual. There are servers and delivery personnel who have been known to create databases recording your details so others can avoid you, or worse yet, target you for pranks, discrimination, or mean revenge. It really is a problem. Some pizza joints have been known to have comments and notes about customers who don’t tip. The common thought is that if you are a bad tipper for any reason other than bad service then you are stealing from the server and are consequently a thief so should be held up to public ridicule. So various staff have made facebook databases, web sites, and public forums “outing” the bad or no tippers, sometimes including their names, addresses, and/or phone numbers obtained from delivery apps, receipts, or credit card slips. Even if there are no physical databases active on the web, darkweb, or a businesses’ computer system … there certainly are mental notes and staff who will remember your face, name, or address and may avoid serving you or giving you proper service. Its always best to be safe and tip – be considerate of the individual who is serving you. There is the Uber Eats drivers forum on “No Tip for Food Delivery? Boycott them.”; Badtippers.com (currently down); the Lousy Tipper database; NFIB – Should you publically shame a bad tipper?; Shitty Tipper Database; Lousytippers.com (currently down); https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2012/aug/17/the-website-which-names-lousy-tippers; the Shitty shitty tipper database; Bad Tippers Suck; and Bitter Waittress.

Then there is the facts that suggest tipping was born out of racism. Should you not tip because it was originally a racist act? Certainly not – because you’re not hurting the industry that is the wrong-doer, you are hurting the server/driver/staff that is struggling on less than minimum wages their employer are giving them with expectation that your tips will make up the additional missing income. This is detrimental to those workers and really damages their livelihoods, especially in America and the tourism industry. Unfair? certainly. The only way this can change is to attack the industry and get companies to pay their employees proper fair wages.

So what exactly is a tip? or gratuity? Gratuity is another term for “tip” which is a certain amount of money that someone “gifts” to another for excellent service. It is additional funds above and beyond the fees or pricing for a item, service, and/or food. It has become a custom in many of the world’s countries. In some places its simply just the extra change to round up to the nearest dollar amount, other times it is a sizable sum often left on the table to thank the server and/or staff. The amounts that people give varies from country to country, and in some countries it is considered insulting. Other countries discourage it. Some countries require it. Originally it became 10%, and more recently has increased to 15-20% of the bill’s total. Some employees are prohibited from tipping if paying for food or services on government payments – government workers in some areas would break the law if they tipped. Unfortunately the practice has become an important part of the income for various service workers like servers, bartenders, delivery drivers, uber/lyft/taxi drivers – and failing to tip the can be a detrimental effect on their livelihood. This is very common in North America. Some restaurants will automatically add a service charge/tip on the bill especially when there is a large party at a restaurant.

In most places, it is illegal for government workers to not only give tips, but to receive them as it can be seen as bribery. For companies that promote tipping such as restaurants, the owners see the act of “tipping” as a incentive for greater work effort. Some abuse the custom by paying lower wages to their employees expecting the tips to make up for the difference. This is where the process has become criminal and abusive of the lower class in the United States. It is in this regard that tipping expected or not, is actually quite arbitrary and discriminatory, adversely affecting livelihoods and lives. It has been proven that amounts of tips can vary based on age, sex, race, hair color, breast size, color of skin, and appearance rather than quality of service.

The etymology for “tipping” and “gratuity” dates to the 1520’s from “graciousness” or the French “gratuite” in the 14th century. The Medieval Latin “gratuitas” or “free gift” or “money given for favor or services”. The practice appears to have begun around 1600 C.E. and was meant as a “small present of money”. It was first attested in 1706 according to the Online Etymology Dictionary. It was first practiced in Tudor England. By the 17th century it was expected that overnight guests in private homes should provide sums of money called “vails” to the host’s servants. This spread to customers tipping in London coffeehouses and commercial establishments. London in the 1890’s also had “crossing sweepers” who cleared the way in the roads for rich people to cross so that they wouldn’t diry their clothes, and they were tipped for this action.

Etymological differences in various languages can also translate the terminology to “drink money” such as “pourboire” in French, “trinkgeld” in German, “drikkepenge” in Danish, and “napiwek” in Polish coming from the custom of inviting a servant to drink a glass in honor of the guest and paying for it to show the guests generosity amongst one another.

Customs in varous Countries:

Africa/Nigeria: not common at upscale hotels and restaurants because the service charge is usually included in the bill although the employees don’t usually get any of it … this has been changing as establishments have begun to coerce customers to tip in the Western world manner even to the manner that there have been reports of security guards asking bank patrons for tips.

Asia: China – there is no tipping. Some hotels that serve foreign tourists will allow it, especially tour guides and drivers. Hong Kong – tipping is not expected at hotels or restaurants because a service charge of 10% is already added to the bill, but taxi drivers sometimes charge the difference between a fare and round sum as a courtesy fee so as not to make change for larger bills. Japan – tipping is very discouraged and seen as an insult (unless masked in an envelope). It also has created confusion. Indonesia – common in large touristy areas like Bali or Lombok where there are a lot of Western visitors. 10% is expected at full-service restaurants, and bar tipping is discretionary depending on the style of the bar. Pubs don’t expect tips, restaurants 10-15%, massage parlors 10-20%, taxi drivers 5%, bellboys $1 a bag. Malaysia – tipping is not expected, restaurants often add a 10% service charge, and if tips are left it is accepted and appreciated, but often is just rounding up. South Korea – not customary nor expected and can be seen as inappropriate behavior. Hotels and restaurants often add on a 10-15% service charge already embedded into the bill. Singapore – not practiced and rarely expected, though bars, restaurants, and some other establishments add in a 10% service charge compounded with the 7% goods and services tax – the staff rarely receive any of this. Taiwan – Not customary but all mid-high end restaurants and hotels have a mandatory 10% service charge which is not given to staff and made out as revenue to the business.

Europe: Tipping started in the United Kingdom and spread throughout, but not all parts of Europe accept it, some will be offended by it. Albania – It is expected everywhere and performance will vary based on requests for tips. Tips of 10% of the bill is customary in restaurants, and while porters, guides, and chauffeurs expect tips – duty-free alcohol is usually the best tip for porters and bellhops, but others may find it offensive (such as Muslims). Croatia – tips are sometimes expected in restaurants, but not mandatory and are often 3-5% of the bill. Clubs and cafe its common to round up the bill and its not common for taxi drivers or hairdressers. Denmark – “drikkepenge” or “drinking money” is not required since service charges must always be included in the bill according to law. Tipping for outstanding services is a matter of choice and never expected. Finland – not customary or expected. France – not required but what you see on the menu is what you are charged for. The French pay their staff a livable wage and do not depend on tips. Some cafe’s and restaurants will include a 15% service charge in the bill as french law for tax assessment requires. “service compris” is a flag that the tip has already been added to the bill but the staff may not get any of it. Tourist places are unofficially accustomed to getting tips. In smaller restaurants or rural areas, tips can be treated with disdain. Amounts of the tip are critical sometimes, such as at least a 5% for good service, and unless tips are given in cash, most of the time the staff won’t receive them if on credit card. Austria/Germany: Coat check staff usually tipped but tipping aka “trinkgeld” is not obligatory. In debates about minimum wage, some people disapprove of tipping and say that it shouldn’t substitue for living wages. It is however seen as good manners in Germany for good services. Germany prohibits to charge a service fee though without the customer’s consent. Tips range from 5-10% depending on the service. While Germans usually tip their waiters almost never the cashiers at big supermarkets. The more personal the service, more common to tip. There are often tipping boxes instead of tipping the person, and rounding up the bill is the most common practice as “stimmt” for keep the change. Tips are considered income in Germany but are tax free. Hungary – “borravalo” or “money for wine” is the tipping there and is commonplace based on type of service received, rounding up the price is most commonplace. Various situations will vary with tipping as either expected, optional, or unusual since almost all bills have service charges included. In Iceland, it is not customary and never expected except with tourist guides who encourage the practice. Ireland – tips are left by leaving small change (5-10%) at the table or rounding up the bill, and very uncommon for them to tip drivers or cleaning staff – it is the tradition thanks for high quality service or a kind gesture. In Italy – tips are only for special services or thanks for high quality service, but is very uncommon and not customary, though all restaurants have a service charge but are required to inform you of said added charges. Norway – service charges are added to the bill so tipping is less common and not expected. If done its by leaving small change 5-15% at the table or rounding up the bill. The Netherlands – it is not obligatory and is illegal and rare to charge service fees without customer’s consent. Sometimes restaurants, bars, taxis, and hotels will make it sound like tipping is required but it is not. Excellent service sometimes sees a 5-15% tip as in 1970 regulations were adopted that all indicated prices must include the service charge and so all prices saw a 15% raise back then so that employees were not dependent on tips. Romania – Tipping is close to bribing in some instances where it is used to achieve a favor such as reservations or getting better seats. tipping is overlooked often and rounding up can be seen as a rude gesture if including coins, otherwise one should use paper currency. Russia – its called “chayeviye” which means “for the tea” and tipping small amounts to service people was common before the Communist Revolution of 1917, then it became discouraged and considered an offensive capitalist tradition aimed at belittling or lower the status of the working class and this lasted until the 1990’s but once the Iron Curtain fell a influx of foreign tourists came it and it has seen a comeback. Slovenia – most locals do not tip other than to round to nearest Euro and the practice is uncommon. Tourist areas have accepted tips of 10-20%. Spain – while not mandatory it is common for excellent services. Tips in the food industry depend on the restaurant and if upscale, small bars and restaurants the small change is left on their plate after paying the bill. Taxi drivers, hairdressers, and hotel staff may expect tips in upscale environments. Sweden – tipping is not expected, but practiced for high quality service as kind gestures, but often is small change on the table or rounding up the bill mainly at restaurants and taxis. Hairdressers aren’t commonly tipped. Tips are taxed in Sweden but cash tips often are not declared. Turkey – “bahsis” or tipping is optional and not customary. 5-10% is appreciated in restaurants and usually by leaving the change. Drivers don’t expect tips although passengers often round up and small change to porters or bellboys. United Kingdom: England/Scotland – customary when served at a table in restaurants, but not cafes or pubs where payment made at the counter often between 10-15%, most commonly 10% rounded up. Golfers tip their caddies. Larger cities may have a service charge included in the bill or added separately commonly at 12.5%. Service charges are only compulsory if displayed before payment and dining, and if bad service, customer can refuse to pay any portion (or all) of said service charge.

North America:
Canada – similar to the United States, tipping is common, expected, and in some cases required. Quebec provides alternate minimum wage for all tipped employees, other provinces do so for bartenders. Servers tend to share their tips with other restaurant employees called “tipping out” or a “tip pool”. Ontario made a law in 2015 to ban employers from taking cuts of tips that are meant for servers and other staff as that became a bad problem until recently. Tips are seen as income and staff must report the income to the Canada Revenue Agency to pay their taxes on it. Caribbean – the practices vary from island to island, such as the Dominican Repulbic adds a 10% gratuity on bills in restaurants and its still customary to tip an extra 10%, St Barths it is expected tips to be 10-15% if gratuity isn’t already included in the bill, and most of the islands expect tips due to being used to it with tourists from the mainland. Mexico – In small restaurants most workers don’t expect tips as the custom is usually only takes place in medium or larger high end restaurants, and when it happens roughly 10-15% not less nor more as a voluntary offering for the good services received on total bill before tax is added (VAT – value added tax). Sometimes VAT is already included in menu pricing. Standard tip in Mexico is 11.5% of the pre-tax bill or 10%. Sometimes tips are added to the bill without the customer’s consent even though its against the law especially bars, night clubs, and restaurants. If this service charge is added it is violation of Article 10 of the Mexican Federal Law of the Consumer and Mexican authorities recommend that patrons require the management to refund or deduct this from the bill. United states – Tipping is a strong social custom and while by definition voluntary at the discretion of the customer, has become mandatory in some instances and/or required, very commonly expected. If being served at a table, a tip of 15-20% of the customer’s check is customary when good service provided, in buffets where they only bring beverages to the table, 10% is customary. Higher tips are often commonly given for excellent service, and lower ones for mediocre service. Tips may be refused if rude or bad service is given and the manager is usually notified. Tipping is common for hairdressers, golf courses, casinos, hotels, spas, salons, bartenders, baristas, food delivery, drivers, taxis, weddings, special events, and concierge services. Fair Labor Standards Act defines tippable employees as those who receive tips of more than $30/month and federal law permits employers to include tips as part of a employee’s hourly wage or minimum wage. Federal minimum wage for tipped employees is $2.13/hour as authorities believe they will make up the difference in tips. The federal minimum wage is still only $7.25/hour. 18 of the 50 states still pay tipped workers the 2.13/hour. 25 states as well as the District of Columbia have their own slightly higher tipped minimums, while the remaining states guarantee state based minimum wage for all workers. Some states have increased this such as Alaska, California, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and Guam require that employees be paid full minimum wage of the state they are working in. Tip pools are used as well but the employer is not allowed to take any, nor any employees who do not customarily receive tips such as the dishwashers, cooks, chefs, and janitors. The average tip in America today is 15-16% with tipping commonly expected regardless of how good service was provided. A few restaurants and businesses in Amrica have adopted a no-tipping model to fight back, but many of these returned to tipping due to loss of employees to competitors. Service charges are often added when there is a large party dining and to catering, banquet, or delivery jobs. This is not to be confused with tips or gratuity in the U.S. which is optional and discretionary to the customer. Some bars have started to include service charges as well – but including these require disclosure to the customer. Until the early 20th century, Americans saw tipping as inconsistent with the values of an democratic egalitarian society, earlier business owners thought of tips as customers attempting to bribe employees to do something that wasn’t customary such as getting larger portions of food, better sittings, reservations, and/or more alcohol in their drinks. After Prohibition in 1919 alot of revenue was lost from no longer selling alcoholic beverages, so financial pressure caused food establishment owners to welcome tips and gradually evolve to expecting them. Tipping never evolved from a server’s low wages because back in the day before tipping was institutionalized, servers were fairly well paid. As tipping evolved to become expected and mandatory servers were paid less. Six states (mainly in the south) however passed laws making tipping illegal though enforcement was difficult, the earliest of which was passed in 1909 within the state of Washington. The last of these laws were repealed in 1926 in Mississippi. These states felt that “the original workers that were not paid anything by their employers were newly freed slaves” and “this whole concept of not paying them anything and letting them live on tips carried over from slavery” (according to Wikipedia article). Tips are considered income and the entire tip amount is considered earned wages except for months wehere tip totals were under $20. The employee must pay 100% of payroll tax on tip income and tips are excluded from worker’s compensation premiums in most states. This sometimes discourages no-tip policies because employers would pay 7.65% additional payroll taxes and up to 9% workers compensation premiums on higher wages in lieu of tips. Tax evasion on tips is very common and a big concern of the IRS. While tips are allowable expenses for federal employees during travel, U.S. law prohibts employees from receiving tips. Tip pooling is also illegal if pooling employees are paid at least the federal minimum wage and don’t customarily receive tips, but was repealed in 2018 so workers have more rights to sue their employers for stolen tips.

South America: Bolivia – Most restaurants have service charges included in the bill, but tips of 5% or more are sometimes given to be polite to the worker. Paraguay – Tipping is not a common part of the culture, there are often service charges included in the bill.

Oceania: Australia – Tipping is not part of Australian customs, so it is not expected or required. Minimum wages in Australia has an annual review adapted for standards of living. Many still round up the amount owed to indicate they were happy with the service as “keep the change”. There is no tradition of tipping someone who is just providing a service like a bellboy, hairstylist, or guide. Casinos in Australia prohibit tipping of gaming staff so its not considered bribery. New Zealand – like Australia, does not possess the tradition though it has become less uncommon in recent years especially with fine establishments and influx of tourism, or American tipping culture. It is expected that employers pay their staff fairly and that minimum wage is raised regularly based on costs of living. The only real tipping is for far and above normal service.

The varying degrees of gratuity around the world causes much problems internationally, as American tourists may continue to tip when travelling to countries where it is not custom, thereby setting precedent that evolves into expectation of Americans travelling abroad. Likewise, tourists from countries that find tipping rude or non-customary, may not tip when in the U.S. and infuriating staff that expect and/or depend upon it. Some Americans have been known to become aggressive, rude, and vindictive when they don’t get tipped and they may not realize the non-tipper is a foreigner who comes from a culture that doesn’t tip. The key is to know the culture you are travelling in. There is a high level of discrimination embedded into tipping culture, and many think the custom should be banned. According to Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt’s Freakonomics blog “Should Tipping be Banned?” they point out from Michael Lynn’s research that “attractive waitresses get better tips then less attractive ones. Men’s appearances, not so important.” “blondes get better tips than brunettes, slender women get better tips then heavier woen, larger breasted women get better tips than smaller breasted ones.” Hooters, an American chain has monopolized on looks for their waitresses and get away with discriminating upon those who don’t fit the look, and therefore the tip. Many will flaunt wealth by distributing big tips, and others do it to demean the worker to make them feel beneath them. After the abolishment of slavery, restaurants and rail operators embraced tipping as a way of getting free labor – hiring newly freed slaves to work for tips alone.


The newest industry being affected by tipping is delivery drivers who get paid $3.25 or lower for a delivery, don’t get paid to wait around for orders, sometimes are given some fees for mileage, but not wear and tear, nor reimbursement for the highly increasing cost of gas. So not only is a drivers time affected when someone doesn’t tip, but their vehicle, cost of gas, and expenses. As a delivery driver, I have gone on deliveries where what i received from a non-tipper and the company didn’t even cover the gas to get to their place and back. Remember that when considering if you should tip or not.

References:


  • Oatman, Maddie 2016 “The Racist, Twisted History of Tipping: Gratuities were once an excuse to shortchange black people. In fact, they still are.” Mother Jones News. website visited at https://www.motherjones.com/environment/2016/04/restaurants-tipping-racist-origins-saru-jayaraman-forked/ on 7/17/18.

  • Wikipedia 2013 “Tipping”. Website referenced at https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tipping on 7/17/18.

  • Video: The Racist History of Tipping : https://www.facebook.com/196848580832824/videos/217512792099736/

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Chuck E. Cheese

Chuck E. Cheese
~ U.S. American Chain ~

I’ve taken my kids to Chuckie Cheese over the years and they always have a blast. Its not that exciting for adults though. The food is mediocre. We’ve had the lunch buffet and its sparse for the amount you pay for the meal. The games are expensive and today are operated by plastic credit cards you purchase and add funds to. They zap points quick and you pay per play, even with the classic games where normally 25 cents – 50 cents gets you three players, you only get one for 25 points from the card.

With over 600 establishments nationwide and 15 other countries, their headquarters are in Irving, Texas. They are a family fun center serving pizza, sandwiches, meals, and refreshments while kids play arcade games, amusement rides, and animatronic displays of the company’s characters leading sing-a-longs.

The first location was in San Jose, California in 1977 originally as a concept by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell to help bring video games to the mainstream by integrating food, entertainment, and arcade together. In 1984 after bankruptcy the chain was acquired by ShowBiz Pizza forming ShowBiz Pizza Time. In 1990 they unified the two brands to Chuck E. Cheese’s Pizza.

Rated: 3 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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The Bench (Colorado Springs, CO)

The Bench
~ 424 S. Nevada Ave, Colorado Springs, Colorado * 375-0930 ~

A medium sized sports bar with a pub atmosphere in downtown Colorado Springs. It was created by the Odyssey Gastropub owners Jenny Schnakenberg and Tyler Sherman offering sports bar fare.

This restaurant has not been reviewed or visited yet.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Burger King

Burger King
~ Worldwide ~

Good tasting food but horrible greasy gut bombs that will takes years off your life. Such would be the image that documentaries like “Super Size Me” would dictate. It is fast food that is meant as a treat, not for substance. Burger King is a competitive hamburger fast food restaurant that is almost as popular as McDonalds. They do have substantially better quality food than McDonalds. It is today a global fast food chain that has its headquarters in Miami-Dade County of Florida. It was founded as “Insta-Burger King” in 1953 in Jacksonville, Florida by David Edgerton and James McLamore who bought the company and renamed it “Burger King”. They saw financial difficulties in the 1960’s as “Insta Burger King” but by the 70’s saw a Golden Age in advertising where they found success. By the 80’s they lost focus and started to lose business. They improved again in 2003. Through its history has changed hands of ownership four times by 2018. It merged with the Canadian donut chain “Tim Hortons” in late 2010 and later became Restaurant Brands International (another Canadian Company).

They expanded from basic burgers to offering a variety of burgers, chicken burgers, french fries, sodas, chicken fries, milkshakes, and their signature “Whopper” that competes with McDonald’s “Big Mac”. From 2002-2010 they targeted young 18-34 males with larger product sizes with unhealthy trans fats and fats. By 2016 it had over 16,000 stores in over 100 countries of which half are located in the United States. The knock off in Australia, Hungry Jacks utilized the theme, look, and operations of Burger King.

Rated: 2 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Hooters

Hooters
~ Worldmide ~

Hooter’s is a chicken wing chain/franchise restaurant found worldwide. The food is good, service is slow, and has a tacky appeal. The focus on waitresses with “Hooters” in skimpy sports-style outfits is actually demeaning and lacks respect for women. The company publicly broadcasts their establishment is based on sex appeal. It is the end result of two privately held American restaurant chains “Hooters of America, Inc.” out of Atlanta, Georgia, and “Hooters, Inc.” based in Clearwater, Florida. The claim is the name “Hooters” is a double entendre off of its “owl” logo known for its “hooting calls” and American slang term for Women’s breasts popularized by Steve Martin on Saturday Night Live. They also operated “Hooters Air” an airline with normal flight crew, attendants, and scantily clad Hooter Girls on each flight.

Hooters discriminately hires only young attractive women whom they refer to as “Hooter Girls” with revealing tight outfits baed on sex appeal. They do hire men and women as cooks, hosts, busboys, and managers. Their older Employee handbook (2006) states “customers can go to many places for wings and beer, but it is our Hooters Girls who make our concept unique. Hooters offers its customers the look of the ‘All Amrican Cheerleader, Surfer, Girl Next Door’. Female employees are required to sign that they “acknowledge and affirm” the following:
My job duties require I wear the designated Hooters Girl uniform.
My job duties require that I interact with and entertain the customers.
The Hooters concept is based on female sex appeal and the work environment is one in which joking and entertaining conversations are commonplace.”

They offer a wide menu of chicken wings, hamburgers, steaks, seafood, appetizers, fries, and other sandwiches. They are also licensed for beer and wine, and in some cases a full liquor bar. They sell memorabilia such as t-shirts, clothing, souvenirs, and curios. By 2016 there were over 430 locations throughout the U.S., US Virgin Islands, Guam, Singapore, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Bolivia, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Germany, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Hungary, Indonesia, Japan, Lithuania, Mexico, Panama, Philippines, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Russia, and one in the United Kingdom.

Hooters began in April 1, 1983 by six Clearwater businessmen – Lynn D. Stewart, Gil DiGiannantonio, Ed Droste, Billy Ranieri, Ken Wimmer and Dennis Johnson originally as a prank because they thought the idea would fail. THey built the first restaurant atop a former rundown nightclub they got at a low price. They opened the first restaurant on October 4, 1983 in Clearwater. In 1984 Hugh Connerty bought the rights to Hooters from the original owners as “Hooters of America” and sold franchising rights. In 2006, Hooters Casino Hoel was opened in Las Vegas. They later opened their first overseas location in Singapore.

Rated: 3 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

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La Caretta Mexican Restaurant (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

La Caretta Mexican Restaurant
~ 35 Iowa Avenue, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80909 ~

This popular Mexican and Cuban fare restaurant seems to be well liked and visited. As a delivery professional I’ve done several pickups there and it appears to be well liked. I have yet to try the place for myself, but on the list for restaurants to review. On occasion they have live traditional bands and entertainment.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Denny’s

Denny’s
~ Worldwide Franchise ~

Oh the memories growing up with “Denny’s”. It was a common hangout during my high school and college years. Late night, sitting for hours, catching up with friends. Even after college, it was a great location for after dancing/clubbing meet ups and place to sober up before heading home. This iconic table service diner-style restaurant chain is certainly an image of the American heartland and definition of American type food. It is called “Denny’s” or “Denny’s Diner” and consists of over 1,600 restaurants across the United States, including Guam, Puerto Rico, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Curacao, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Venezuela, Honduras, Japan, New Zealand, Qatar, the Phillipines, and the United Arab Emirates. It is famous for being open 24 hours, 7 days a week, year round except where required by law to be closed. They are open on holidays and late nights. They place themselves close to interstates, freeways, bars, and service areas.

A humble history spurring from a donut shop, Denny’s was birthed by Harold Butler and Richard Jezak as “Danny’s Donuts” in Lakewood California in 1953. In 1956, Jezak left the business leaving it to Butler who changed the image and concept from a donut shop to a coffee shop renamed “Danny’s coffee shops” operating 24 hours a day. By 1959 they changed their name to “Denny’s Coffee Shops” as another chain went by the name of “Coffee Dan’s” in Los Angeles. By 1961 they simplified their name to “Denny’s”. They became a franchise in 1963 and most of the locations today are franchise owned. In 1977 they introduced their very popular Grand Slam breakfast. By 1981 there were over 1,000 restaurants throughout the United States. They also absorbed many of the Sambo restaurants. By 1994 they became the largest corporate sponsor of “Save the Children” charity. Operating non-stop, 24 hours, many locations were built without locks and some are said to have lost their keys. With headquarters in La Mirada, California until 1989, they relocated to Irvine, California, then Spartanburg, South Carolina becoming acquired by Trans World Corporation in 1987.

They became notorious for the “free birthday meals” to anyone on their birthdates, but this only survived from 1990-1993 but was cut off due to over-use and abuse. They offer a free Birthday Build-Your-Own-Slam on a customer’s proven and tracked birth date. By 1994 they changed their theme, outlook, and decoration with a lighter color scheme. They were reviewed by the October 2004 Dateline NBC news story called “Dirty Dining” criticizing Denny’s cleanliness, safety, and operations pulling the health inspection records of over 100 of its establishments for a 15 month span totaling all of the critical violations that could lead to adverse effects of a customer’s health compared to Applebee’s, Bob Evans, Chili’s, IHOP, Outback, Red Lobster, Ruby Tuesday, TGI Friday’s, and Waffle House. They had the fewest violations averaging less than one violation per restaurant which they proudly boast is due to their successful model of their “principles of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points.”

However in 1934, they were damaged by their involvement in a series of discrimination lawsuits over food servers denying or providing inferior service to racial minorities from African Americans to Native Americans. That year, six black U.S. Secret Service agents visited a Denny’s in Annapolis, Maryland and were forced to wait an hour for service while their white companions were seated immediately. The 1994 class action lawsuit filed by black customers who were refused service, forced to wait longer, or pay more than white customers led to a $54.4 million settlement. In 1995 a African American customer in a Sacramento California location was told that he and his friends had to pay up front at the counter before ordering their meals, because, according to the waittress, said some black guys had been in earlier who made a scene and walked out without paying their bill, so the manager now wanted all blacks to pay up front. In 1997, six Asian American students from Syracuse University were discriminated upon late at night at a Denny’s having to wait more than a 1/2 hour as white patrons were served before them. After they complained to management, they were forced to leave by security, then afterwards a group of white men came out of Denny’s and attacked them, some beaten unconscious. Denny’s addressed this with racial sensitivity training programs for their employees and worked hard to improve public relations featuring African-Americans in their commercials. They made headway and was awarded in 2001 by Fortune Magazine to be the “Best Company for Minorities”. By 2006/2007 they topped Black Enterprise’s “Best 40 Companies for Diversity.” However in 2017, a Vancouver Denny’s made an Indigenous woman pay for her meal before it was served. The restaurant called the police on her after she left claiming she had a sharp-metal object in her pocket.

June of 2017, eight Denny’s in Colorado Springs and Pueblo, Colorado were immediately shut down because the franchise owner failed to pay close to $200,000 in back taxes as well as $30,000 in sales tax from the previous year. Many of these employees also filed that their accounts were not paid, received bounced checks and paychecks not arriving on time. The IRS came in and closed the locations, seizing property, and no advance notice given to its employees for the closures, leaving many without work or preparation for the losses. The franchise owner fled the state of Colorado.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Continue reading Denny’s

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Little Nepal (Colorado Springs)

Little Nepal Indian Restaurant
~ 1747 S 8th St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80905 | Phone: (719) 477-6997 | lnepal.com ~

One of Colorado Springs finest Indian restaurants who are notorious for their amazing buffets. Located off 8th street, traditional style and decor – friendly service worth the wait. Tibetan, Nepalese, and India cuisine. Delicious and spicy. Wide assortment of offerings. A must visit for any Indian food connoisseur …

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Wings 2 Go (Colorado Springs)

Wings 2 Go (Flatiron’s)
~ 2540 Tenderfoot Hill St,
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906 | Phone: (719) 576-2540 ~

Un-disclosed Wings to Go at the counter within Flat Irons restaurant, this service is featured primarily with Uber Eats. The rest of the restaurant is dine in hearty American grill fare featuring fish tacos, steak, and pizza. I have yet to try “Wings 2 go” but I’ve heard they are pretty good. Not yet reviewed.

Rated: ___ of 5 stars. Currently un-rated. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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