Category Archives: Oregon

Starbucks (Keizer, OR)

Starbucks (Keizer, Oregon)
2555 Jorie Lane NE
Keizer, OR
503-463-1044

A great location with good service. The Chai Creme Frappacinos were good. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

Chronicles: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=10537

To read more about the Starbucks Corporation for history, links, and resources visit here: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2345.

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Starbucks – Ashland, Oregon (downtown)

051414-012

Starbucks (Ashland, Oregon)

Right in the heart of downtown Ashland, the Shakespeare Capital of the Pacific Northwest, is this small little cafe nestled amongst the downtown shops. Not much seating, its more or less a walk-and-go location. The staff is friendly and amicable, but because of Ashland’s silly food tax laws, charges taxes on your drinks as does any food place downtown Ashland. The drinks are expensive here. Getting Chai Creme Frappacino‘s here was a common practice for us as we owned a store just down the road. Rating: 2 stars out of 5

To read more about the Starbucks Corporation for history, links, and resources visit here: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=2345.

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Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon

Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway

Historic Columbia River Highway
Columbia River, State of Oregon, USA

The Historic Columbia River Highway runs along the Columbia River on the Oregon side for approximately 75 miles. It is considered one of the most scenic highways in Oregon and was the first planned scenic roadway in the United States. It begins in Troutdale and ends in The Dalles as a important safe passage being built between 1913 and 1922. Points of interest are the Bridge of the Gods and Cascade Locks. Another area of special interest is where the historic highway runs through Mosier and its preserved tunnels highlighting scenic tour days. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Landmark and is designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It was replaced for logistics, speed, safety, and accessibility with the construction of the Interstate Highway 84 during the 1930’s and 1950’s, falling to be a placade of history maintained by the state of Oregon as Historic Columbia River Highway No. 100 or Route 30 as well as the “Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.” Is was modeled after the great scenic roads of Europe and the project initiated by Sam Hill (local lawyer and entrepreneur) with the assistance of engineer Samuel C. Lancaster. It was envisioned first as a tourist play route for road trips in the Model T absorbing the beauty of the Columbia River and its waterfalls. It blended in as Highway Route 30 when the U.S. Highway system was established in 1926. It was an essential route taking advantage of the lowest crossing of the Cascade Mountains that was carved by the Columbia River during the Cascades mountain uplift providing a safe and economic alternative to the previous dangerous rafting portages used by the Oregon Trail. Originally at this crossing was the Barlow Road in 1846 around the south side of Mount Hood, followed by the Sandy wagon road in the 1870s, and the railway. It was a very difficult highway to create dealing with numerous curves, grades, distance, rockfalls, avalanches, and drops. All the locations with elements of natural beauty and scenic wonder were set as control points along the route to be included.

Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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State of Oregon

Oregon, United States of America
www.oregon.gov

Oregon is also known as the “Beaver State”. The earliest known use of the name “Oregon” was spelled as “Ouragon” by Major Robert Rogers in his 1765 petition to the Kingdom of Great Britain referring to the Columbia River which was seen as the mythical River of the West. It was in 1778 that the current spelling became “Oregon”. Oregon’s capital is Salem and its largest city is Portland. It has a population of approximately 3,831,074 (2010 Census). Its highest point is “Mount Hood” at 11,249 feet above sea level and its lowest point is sea level on the Pacific Ocean. Located at the southern end of the Pacific Northwest, Oregon is bordered by the Pacific Ocean on its West, State of Washington to its North, California to its south, and Nevada and Idaho on the East. The main waterways/rivers through the state are the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Oregon had an aboriginal inhabitation for almost 15,000 years, with European settlers arriving as traders, explorers, and settlers by 1843 when it was called “The Oregon Territory”. The first Europeans to come to Oregon were the Spanish in the late 17th Century. The British Captain James Cook explored the coast in 1778 while searching for the Northwest Passage. This was also a Quest of the Lewis and Clark Expedition who built their winter fort at Fort Clatsop on the mouth of the Columbia River. By the 16th century, Oregon was home to various tribes including the Bannock, Chasta, Chinook, Molalla, Nez Perce, Klamath, Kalapuya, Takelma, and the Umpqua. Oregon became the USA’s 33rd state being added to the Union on February 14, 1859. By 1811 the Northwest Company, captained by David Thompson, was the first to navigate the entire length of the Columbia River. Oregon’s Willamette River valley is its most densely populated area and home to 8 of the 10 most populated Oregon cities. Continue reading State of Oregon

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Mosier Twin Tunnels, Mosier, Oregon

Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083)

Mosier Twin Tunnels
Mosier, Oregon

These remnants of the Columbia River Highway’s history echoes a time of great adventure, slow travel, and mesmerizing views. The Columbia River Highway once came through these cliffs back in 1921. There were 2 tunnels that originally were built through this high rock point to allow for travel. It was a popular highway then turned byway, then turned trail. It gave fabulous views of the Columbia River and the Gorge. The architects of the tunnels took their inspirated from the Axenstrasse along Lake Lucerne, Switzerland. But regardless of the sound design, these tunnels were plagued with troubles, especially rockfalls and automobile accidents. In 1954 they build the replacement road at water level along the river, and these tunnels were abandoned and fell into disrepair. The replacement road became Interstate 84. In 1995 the tunnels were re-opened for tourist byway access, and then converted to the Historic Columbia River Highway Trail, completely restored. It was opened to hikers in 2000 as a 4 1/4 mile hiking trail. Panoramic scenic overlooks, picnic tables, and paved trails appease the regular day-visitors to this hotspot along the Columbia. Great views of 18 mile island can be seen very nicely from several vantage points along the trail. THere is an etching of a message scratched into the rock past the sencond window in 1921 by a hunting party that was trapped there from snow fall in the past.

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Eighteen Mile Island, Columbia River, Oregon

18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095)

18 Mile IslandBR>~ Mosier, Oregon ~

Originally called “Chicken Charlie’s Island”, this little island is a scenic wonder along the Columbia River that is nearly 10 acre large island on the Oregon side of the Columbia River. It can be seen from Interstate Highway, milepost 174. It is located approximately a half mile from Mosier, Oregon. It is believed to have hosted a chicken ranch on int in 1904 owned by the Reither family. In 1915 it was inhabited by Charles Reither who lived on it until his death in 1963. It is a privately owned small rocky island that hosts navigational lights and was an island referenced by Meriwether Lewis during the Lewis and Clark expedition. It is pretty rocky, barren and remote. It hosts douglas firs, willows, wildflowers, cherry, blackberry, and a little sandy beach. There is a three story wood frame house on it that was privately built in 1969. It was later renamed “Eighteenmile Island” by the USGS in 1934. In 2007 the island and house was for sale to the amount of 1.4 million. Great views of the island can be seen from the Mosier Twin Tunnels hiking trail along the Historic Columbia River Highway.

18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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Mosier, Oregon

Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by  Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016.

Mosier, Oregon

A charming littler artistic town, Mosier is most popular for the Mosier Twin Tunnels hiking trail. The area was first settled by white Euro-Americans in 1854 and became a city in 1914. They built a post office here, then the Mosier School in 1920, which later became a charter school known as the Mosier Community School in 2003. The town is approximately .64 square miles. It is downstream of the 18 mile island and was along the Columbia River Highway long ago. Today, the 96 oil car derailment that caused a natural disaster on June 3, 2016 has placed Mosier on the map.

Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by  Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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The haunted White Eagle Tavern (Portland, OR)

White Eagle Hotel and Pub:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
White Eagle Hotel and Pub: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

White Eagle Hotel and Pub
~ 836 N Russell St, Portland, OR 97227
Phone: (503) 282-6810 ~

Another McMannamin’s favorite tourist destinations, the White Eagle is more of a hostel than it is a hotel. It is located in one of the micro-brewery destination neighborhoods of Portland, Eliot in North Portland with a style of a hotel in glamour of rock n’ roll themed lodging and saloon. The building dates back to 1905. The basic rooms are located above the pub and individually furnished, has free wi-fi, and wash basins. Some rooms have bun beds. There is no air conditioning and the bathrooms are shared between rooms. The bar has a artsy feel, with rock-n-roll and odd sideshow decor, with a beer garden and nightly live music. The establishment lacks in parking, although it has a very small lot. While we have yet had a chance to lodge in this hotel, we did eat and drink at the pub in the beer garden. Service was friendly, albeit moderate in speed. It was overall a good experience. Rating: 3 stars out of 5

The Tavern:

Folklore: – the Tavern is purported to be haunted. According to Ghosts and Critters this is a favorite haunted night spot. There are tales from Jeff, the assistant manager and other employees that various strange events happen on occasion, especially after hours. There was a time when the bar was empty and employees smelled smoke inside. They investigated and never found evidence of fire, and on occasion in addition to this smell, they would be overcome with the odor of cheap perfume. Once Jeff while working in the kitchen had witnessed a menu board fly across the doorway to the basement and strike flat against the left-hand wall with a loud clap. He couldn’t figure out how that happened. Especially on its own, with no employees nearby except for one standing behind him and witnessing the event.

White Eagle Hotel and Pub:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
White Eagle Hotel and Pub: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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White Eagle Hotel and Pub, Portland, Oregon

White Eagle Hotel and Pub:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan,  and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
White Eagle Hotel and Pub: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907.

White Eagle Hotel and Pub
~ 836 N Russell St, Portland, OR 97227
Phone: (503) 282-6810 ~

Another McMannamin’s favorite tourist destinations, the White Eagle is more of a hostel than it is a hotel. It is located in one of the micro-brewery destination neighborhoods of Portland, Eliot in North Portland with a style of a hotel in glamour of rock n’ roll themed lodging and saloon. The building dates back to 1905. The basic rooms are located above the pub and individually furnished, has free wi-fi, and wash basins. Some rooms have bun beds. There is no air conditioning and the bathrooms are shared between rooms. The bar has a artsy feel, with rock-n-roll and odd sideshow decor, with a beer garden and nightly live music. The establishment lacks in parking, although it has a very small lot. While we have yet had a chance to lodge in this hotel, we did eat and drink at the pub in the beer garden. Service was friendly, albeit moderate in speed. It was overall a good experience. Rating: 3 stars out of 5

White Eagle Hotel and Pub:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
White Eagle Hotel and Pub: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Grand Central Cafe, Portland, Oregon

Grand Central Cafe, Portland, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25903.  Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Grand Central Cafe, Portland, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25903.

Grand Central Bakery
~ 2230 SE Hawthorne Blvd Portland, OR 97214 ~ http://grandcentralbakery.com/ ~

We stopped at this Pacific Northwest Bakery chain while waiting to meet some friends. It had some tasty chai and great cross buns for the Easter holiday season. It was originally created by Gwen Bassetti at Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square, locally owned chain dedicated to artisan baking. An assortment of breads, baked goods, sandwiches, soups, teas, coffees, and juices can be found here. Her original sandwich start started in Seattle’s newly refurbished Grand Central Hotel Building where it changed names from Gwen’s roadside farm stand on Lopez Island in the 60’s to the Grand Central Bakery in 1989. Famous for her Como loaves. Rating: 4 stars out of 5

Grand Central Cafe, Portland, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25903.  Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Grand Central Cafe, Portland, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25903. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Troutdale, Oregon

Troutdale, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Troutdale, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911.

Troutdale, Oregon ~

This little unknown touristy town that is actually a “burb” of Portland outskirts / Gresham is the western gateway to the Historic Columbia River Highway, the Mount Hood Scenic Byway, and the Columbia River Gorge. It was once named after the Sandy River as “Sandy” with its first established post office as “Sandy” in 1854 but then closed in 1868. Another town in Clackamas County named itself Sandy and therefore this “Sandy” needed a new name – the pioneer John Harlow gave it the name “Troutdale” after a trout pond in a dale near his house, founding it as such in 1880. The Bissinger Company or Bissinger Wool Pullery came her and built a water tower in 1920. The company was featured in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! because a cat was found in a stack of animal hides during production, and after being saved, became the company’s mascot. The town is 12 miles east of Portland and sits at the confluence of the Columbia River and the Sandy River.

Troutdale, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Troutdale, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Multnomah Falls

072413-129

Multnomah Falls
* Columbia River, Oregon *

A spectacular panoramic waterfall along the Columbia River Gorge on the Oregon side, just east of Troutdale. It drops in two steps split into a upper falls plunging 542 feet, and a smaller bottom level with a 69 foot drop. It is Oregon’s tallest waterfall, and the second tallest year-round waterfall in the United States. It is fed from underground springs coming from the Larch Mountain, augmented by spring runoff. The park is free and ample parking is shared by east and westbound travelling along the Columbia river corridor. A must stop for anyone travelling in the area. Great rest stop as well with restaurant, cafe, gift shop, and restrooms. A highly popular tourist stopoff.

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Oregon Motor Motel (The Dalles Oregon)

Oregon Motor Inn, The Dalles, Oregon. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 28, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Oregon Motor Inn, The Dalles, Oregon.

Oregon Motor Inn
~ 200 W 2nd St, The Dalles, OR 97058 ~ (541) 296-9111 ~ http://www.thedallesmotel.com/ ~

A great little motel/ motor inn at the heart of the Dalles downtown. Comfy, friendly, and affordable. Its conveniently located to most hotspots for tourists such as being a three minute walk to the Old St. Peter’s Landmark Preservation area or 5 minutes to the Columbia Riverfront Trail. The rooms have views of the Gorge, free WiFi, cable TV, microwaves, antique bathrooms, free coffee in the lobby, on-site parking, and mini fridges. We had a great restful stay. Rated: 3 1/2 stars out of 5

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Cascade Locks, Oregon

Bridge of the Gods - Cascade Locks, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25915. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Bridge of the Gods – Cascade Locks, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25915.

A very small tourist town (ca. 3 square miles) with just over 1,000 residents, sitting along the Columbia River is named appropriately for the Locks built atop the Cascade Rapids perpendicular to the town. It is a town located in Hood River County Oregon. The locks were built to improve navigation past the Cascade Rapids and the town grew up in support of the workers in the area. The locks were built in 1878 and completed in 1896. They became submerged in 1938 and no longer used, as they were replaced by the Bonneville Lock and Dam. They became the Cascade Locks Marina Park and Campground sitting in the shadow of the legendary yet modern Bridge of the Gods. Cascade Locks also is a few miles upstream from the Eagle Creek Gorge where the Pacific Crest Trail cuts through, making Cascade Locks a popular stop-off for the PCT Hikers. The town has been in political limelight of late as the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs in 1999 has attempted to build a off-reservation casino here, and since 2008 the city has been trying to sell off its well water to Nestle for bottling. In May 2016, voters from Hood River County was 65% in favor of stopping the Nestle operations, although the town is still fighting the County to allow it. This has recently made Cascade Locks a hotspot for ecological concern. The region is pleasantly warm (never too hot due to the winds) with dry summers, and no average monthly temperatures over 71.6 degrees fahrenheight giving it a warm summer Mediterranean climate. It is also home to a salmon hatchery.

Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken June 6, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ).

The Canals and Locks

    “Cascades Canal and Locks – The need to improve travel in the Columbia River began with the flow of immigrants heading west and grew steadily as that flow swelled into a tidal wave of commerce. Getting around the rapids remained the greatest challenge. In 1876 Congress appropriated $90,000 to the US Army Corps of Engineers to study construction of a canal at the Cascades. For the next 20 years until the canal opened in 1896, a succession of Corps’ Engineers and private contractors struggled against the forces of nature to complete the monumental project. The canal was originally designed to be eight feet deep, fifty feet wide, and 7,200 feet long at low water with two locks. The cost was fixed at $1.2 million. No sooner had work begun in November 1878 than high winds, rain, and floating ice prevented river travel and isolated the work force at Cascade Locks. Nature had given notice that the cost of the change would be high. In 1880-1881, it was determined that specifications must be changed because of a miscalculation of the low water mark. The plans were revised so that there would be only one lock 90 feet wide and 462 feet long with a lift of 24 feet (later changed to 36 feet.) Work resumed on the canal in 1886. skilled stonemasons cut stones for the canal walls. Unmortared basalt rocks three feet thick were laid above the high water mark. There were now four sets of lock gates. The guard gates at the upper end of the canal were the largest built to that time. They were 55 feet by 52.6 feet and weighed 325,353 pounds. Because the river flood created each year in early June, no work could be done during the dry summer months. Each year at the beginning of the flood season, all of the equipment had to be moved and then re positioned after the flood was over. Work resumed in the fall but was hampered by heavy rainfall and frequent snows. Workers wore cumbersome oilskin coats and awkward boots, showing their efforts greatly. Funds were slow in coming and in 1886 Major Handbury noted that “a generation will have been born and gone to its grave between the beginning and ending of this enterprise’. At last after the flood damage of 1894 was repaired the canal was opened in 1896. 1.8 million dollars had been expended but the cost of human toil far exceeded any dollar amount. Given the isolated and extreme nature of the site, otherwise mundane project statistics are staggering. ” ~ sign at Cascade Locks Marina Park and Campground, Cascade Locks, Oregon

Troutdale, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Troutdale, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Bridge of the Gods, Oregon

Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken June 6, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ).

Bridge of the Gods
~ Columbia River, Cascade Locks, Oregon ~

Legend has it that this area was home to a magnificent land bridge manifested by the Gods of the local Native Americans. Today it is a steel toll bridge crossing the Columbia River connecting Interstate 84 with Washington State Road 14. It is one of the few crossings between Oregon and Washington.

Legend and Lore
Geologically this is one of the shortest crossing areas between Oregon and Washington over the Columbia River. It is believed that a thousand years ago there was a massive landslide from the north shore of the Columbia River that slid into the river and blocked the Gorge. It created a natural dam and inland sea that extended between Oregon, Washington, and into Idaho. As river pressures began carving out natural bridges and tunnels under this landslide to outlet into the Pacific, eventually the blockage dam was washed away. Some say it originally carved a large natural stone bridge that the Native Americans believed was created by the Gods. Legend has it this land bridge eventually collapsed back into the Columbia River, destroying the inland sea, and creating the Cascade rapids.

Native America legends tell a tale that the Great Spirit Manito created this bridge so his peoples of the Columbia River could cross the river from bank to bank, and it was so called the “Giant Crossover”. This Great Spirit assigned the Wise woman Guardian Loo-Wit to watch over it and protect the river, bridge, and peoples of the area. Out of fear and respect for the Great Spirit, the tribes would appeal for protection while crossing the river. It was eventually called the “Bridge of the Gods” translated and nicknamed as such from the white westerners who came through the area. Manito had sent his sons to earth – the three great mountains: Multnomah the Warrior (Mt. Rainier), Klickitat the totem maker (Mt. Adams), and Wyeast, the singer (Mt. Hood) who all presided over the river and the bridge peacefulling for many years until the beautiful Squaw Mountain moved into the valley between Klickitat and Wyeast. She fell in love with Wyeast while still flirting with Klickitat, causing rivalry and jealousy between the two causing the mountains to fight over her. Their arguing, growling, trembling, and feuds caused lava, ash, and earthquakes to form in their path – and each other hurling white hot rocks at each other. This destroyed the forests, environment, and beauty of the valley – and broke the bridge causing it to fall into the river never to be seen again. Manito was so upset by this, he formed huge rapids in the Columbia River to separate the feuding brothers. Klickitat won Squaw Mountain’s heart and Wyeast admitted defeat, much to the dismay of Squaw who loved him so, and although at the side of Klickitatt with a heavy broken heart, became depressed and fell into a deep permanent sleep and sits today as “Sleeping Beauty” lying just west of Mt. Adams. Klickitat under such shock from Squaw’s depression, once with a high straight head like Wyeast, fell with grief that he dropped his head in shame and never raised it again. Loo-Wit got caught up in the cross-fire during this battle, and fell with the bridge. the Great Spirit rewarded her with a wish, and she asked to be made young and beautiful again – but being old, she did not require companionship so chose a lonely location. She became the most beautiful of all mountains and made her home far west as the beautiful and powerful Mount Saint Helens.

History
In 1920 the U.S. War Department issued a construction permit for the bridge to be built for the Interstate Construction Corporation. By 1925 one pier was constructed and the project seemed a failure until the Wauna Toll Bridge Company purchased the project in October 1926 for just over $602,000. They built a large canti-lever bridge with a 707’9″ main span and 211’8″ anchor arms extending 1,131 feet with an overall length of 1,858 feet / 35 feet width across the Columbia River. The original model had a wooden deck and was only 91 feet over the water surface. The bridge had to be raised after the construction of the Bonneville Dam to handle the backwater. This upgrade was funded in part by Congress in 1940 for just over $762,000. The bridge was taken over in 1953 by the Columbia River Bridge Company and eventually purchased by the Port of Cascade Locks Commission for $950,000 on November 1, 1961.

Modern Times
The steel construct of the modern “Bridge of the Gods” is owned and operated by the Port authority of Cascade Locks, Oregon. It is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and costs $1.00 to cross for an average automobile. Before the current model, there was a much more spectacular construct. It is a canti-levered bridge that is the third oldest bridge found on the Columbia River.

Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken June 6, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken June 6, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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The Dalles, Oregon

The Dalles, Oregon

Along the Columbia River by the dam is “The Dalles”, a small town with just over 13,600 residents (2010). It is the largest city on the Oregon side of the Columbia River outside of Portland. It originally began as a major Native American trade center beginning approximately 10,000 years ago and as thus, is a major location for some of Columbia River’s most important archaeological discoveries. It was here in 1805 that Lewis and Clark camped and recorded the area as “Quenett” after the Indian name for Mill Creek where they camped. The name of the city “The Dalles” comes from the French word “dalle” meaning “sluice” or “flagstone” after the column shaped basalt rocks that over the ages was carved by the river. It also related to “rapids” as used by French-Canadian employes of the Northwest Company referring to the rapids on the Columbia River at this point, as well as Celilo Falls. It was also nicknamed Little Dalles or Short Narrows. The Historic Columbia River Highway, one of Oregon’s famous scenic byways ends its route here.

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Hood River, Oregon

Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015.

Hood River, Oregon
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683

A magnificent port city where the Hood River meets the Columbia River, “Hood River” is named after the river that flows through the city. A small city with just under 7,200 inhabitants (2010 census: 7167) it is a central point of tourism along the Columbia River and the Gorge. Hood River, the City is located approximately 30 miles north of Mount Hood – the tallest peak in all of Oregon. Across the Columbia River is White Salmon and Bingen, Washington. South of the city is Hood River Valley where some of the Gorge’s most famous apples, cherries, and pears are grown.

White Euro-American settlement in the area began in the 19th century, with the post office becoming established on September 30, 1858 and the city becoming incorporated in 1895. In 1908, Hood River became part of Hood River County after establishing its own county parting from Wasco County.

The city takes up approximately 3.35 square miles along the Columbia River, just west of the Hood River. The city resides in the transition zone between the wet temperate rainforest of the west and the dry shrub-steppe desert of the east granting the city a moderate climate with rainy winters and warm summers, and less rainfall than most of eastern Oregon averaging around 30 inches a year. Just 20 miles west in Cascade Locks, the annual precipitation is approximately 75 inches and 20 miles east, in the Dalles less than 15 inches a year. Temperatures are slightly cooler here than most nearby cities because of the air drainage off of Mt. Hood. Hood River area is known for the consistent high winds that channel down the Columbia River Gorge making it a very popular windsurfing location. Hood River has fast become one of the world’s most famous locations for windsurfing and kiteboarding. It is also a prime location for kayaking, mountain biking, skiing, and hiking in the U.S. featured in Sunset, Outside, Backpacker, Smithsonian, National Geographic Adventure, and the New York Times travel section as the “coolest small town” or the “fifth best ski-town in America”.

Hood River’s economy relies on agriculture, tourism, and sports recreation although the tech industry such as aerospace engineering with Google, Insitu and Hood Technologies being the largest employers in the region. In addition to cider and wine production, apple and pear orchards, the area is known for its cherries. The area is very popular for winery and cider tours, and the “Fruit Loop” because of the large Hood River based “The Fruit Company”. Hood River is known for its wineries and distilleries, especially Sail Brewing Company, one of Oregon’s most famous microbreweries. It is also home to Dakine the sports and clothing equipment manufacturer, Turtle Island Foods – the vegetarian food manufacturer who produces Tofurky. Hood River is also home to many arts and cultural gatherings. Each year in April, the Hood River Valley Blossom Festival is held and in October the Hood River Valley Harvest Festival. Each August, the annual Gorge Games takes place with competitions in 10 sports such as windsurfing, kiteboarding, outrigger canoeing, and rock climbing. Hood River is home to a protected harbor called “The Hook” where it is popular to teach windsurfing. There is also a Waterfront Park with public pool, Skate Park, biking trails, and ball fields. Numerous other smaller parks exist as well. There are also two 18-hole golf courses.

Hood River is also home to the Columbia Gorge Hotel (National Register place), History Museum of Hood River County, International Museum of Carousel Art, Western Antique Aero plane & Automobile Museum, and over 2 dozen other National Register of Historic Places.

Racially, Hood River is approximately 63% white, 24% Hispanic, 1.6% Asian/Pacific Islander, .5% African American, .6% Native American, 3% Mixed, and 7.4% from other races according to the 2010 census.

Hood River/Columbia River marina. Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River/Columbia River marina. Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.

Hood River, Oregon (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683). 01/22/16: Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 -   Photos from  January 22, 2016 . (c) 2016 - photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley /   Leaf McGowan   of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).
Hood River, Oregon (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683). 01/22/16: Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 – Photos from January 22, 2016 . (c) 2016 – photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Leaf McGowan of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).
Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.

Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.

    “Hood River {from Steamboats to Sailboards} Gale-Force winds bedeviled explorers and emigrants alike in the Columbia River Gorge. Journals from the 1800s depict travel as treacherous through the singular passage in the Cascade Range where 60 mile per hour gusts are common. By the 1880s, steamboats and a new railroad linked Hood River with communities to the east and west. Spectacular scenery and a dryer climate made this blustery place a popular escape from the dampness and drizzle of western Oregon. When the Historic Columbia River Highway reached Hood River in 1916, Portlanders flocked to this hamlet in their Model T’s. Today the same conditions that created dry, breezy appeal at the turn of the century offer perfect conditions for windsurfing. Many visitors now come to Hood River just to glimpse “board heads” engaged in this colorful sport – Mountaineering became popular in the West during the 1890s and Hood River allowed the best access to Mt. Hood. Cloud Cap Inn, Oregon’s oldest mountain resort was constructed at the 6000 foot level of the mountain’s North Slope in 1889. The Inn was a favorite summer destination for hikers, and mountain climbers. Today it is a base for mountain rescue operations. Excursions “round the mountain” from Hood River were a must when the Mt. Hood Loop Road opened in 1925. Lumber baron Simon Benson built the Columbia Gorge Hotel right) on a cliff overlooking the river in 1921 for $500,000. The hotel catered to upscale clientele serving dainty lunches and salmon dinners. In the center of town, the Hood River Hotel provided accommodations for commercial travelers. Windsurfing once an obscure avocation for the brave or foolhardy, is today a multi-million-dollar industry in the Columbia River Gorge. ” ~ information sign, Hood River beach by the bridge, Hood River, Oregon.

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The History of Wandering Leaf Designs or “Wandering Leaf, LLC”

Wandering Leaf Designs, also known as “Wandering Leaf, LLC” was a web studio located in the region of North America’s Pacific Northwest – servicing its clients in the United States & Canadian provinces. A Limited Liability Company, Wandering Leaf Designs provided their clients with top-notch web designs, logos, art, graphics, wireless / nomadic technologies, and hot spots of interest from 2000 until 2004. “Wandering Leaf Designs” was founded after the closure of “Leafworks, Inc.. “Wandering Leaf Designs” was closed when its C.E.O., organizer, lead designer/developer, and mover/shaker left the .dotcom industry to return to his passion of “Archaeology & Anthropology”. Once on the trail to doing work at the Camano Beach Excavation, Miami Circle’s “Icon Brickell” project, and finally to be the GIS Specialist/Curator for the U.S. Army’s Cultural Resource Management Program at Fort Carson, he no longer had the time to continue operating “Wandering Leaf Designs”, much of which was the lasting demise of the “.dotcom” collapse that started in the late 1990’s into the early Y2K era. The Company closed shortly after his absence.

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Eugene, Oregon

Eugene, Oregon

Eugene Oregon competes with Seattle for the title of “Emerald City”. It is also known as “Hippie Town” and “Track Town USA”. Eugene will always have a dear part of my life as “home”. While I only lived there from 1993-1994, and 2000-2001, it has been a place I often visit annually and consider to be one of my “homes”. Eugene is the 2nd largest city in the state of Oregon. It resides geographically at the confluence of the McKenzie and Willamette Rivers 50 miles east of the Oregon Coast. In 2008, Eugene’s population was a heaping 154,620 residents with a Eugene/Springfield metropolitan area of 345,880. Eugene is a town of political and environmental activism, arts, culture, free thinking, and creativity. It is also a college town being the home to the University of Oregon. The city is astonishing magical and well noted for its natural beauty, recreation, activism, arts, and “alternative” lifestyles. It is a mecca for joggers, runners, bicyclists, rafters, and kayakers. The City has a motto of being the “World’s Greatest City of the Arts and Outdoors”. It is called “Track Town USA” because the Nike Corporation began in Eugene. The City is named after its founder “Eugene” Franklin Skinner. Eugene Skinner erected a cabin that was used as a trading post for the area and was established as a U.S. Post Office on January 8, 1850 and was called “Skinner’s Mudhole”. Skinner founded Eugene in 1862 and ran ferry services across the Willamette River. Columbia College moved to the area and brought educational interest to the region. The College was devestated by two fires which led to its demise. A few years later, the University of Oregon was built from a public university that the town raised capital to build as the city wanted to become a “center of learning”. It did by 1872 when the University of Oregon became a state institution and opened its doors in 1876. North of town looms Skinner Butte, and to the Northeast are the Coburg Hills, with Spencer Butte south of the city, and Mount Pisgah to the southeast making it a town of hills. Amazon Creek, Willamette River, and McKenzie Rivers run through the town. Eugene resides in the Marine West Coast climate zone and hosts some Mediterranean characteristics with mild year round temperatures, with warm dry summers and mild wet winters. Spring and fall are the most moist seasons with light rain throughout the year. Snowfall is sporadic and rarely accumulates large amounts as the average seasonal amount is 5 inches with a median of 0. The hottest months are July and August with average highs of 82 degrees Fahrenheit. Only 15 days out of the year go above 90 degrees. The coolest month is December with an average medium of mid 40’s and nights just above freezing. Eugene has the highest grass pollen counts in the United States wreaoking havoc to those with allergies or asthma. Eugene stands for community inventiveness and is home for many of the community development trends that exist in North America. It was the ground zero for many activist, communal, cooperative and community projects in the 60’s and 70’s. Eugene prides itself for its small family owned natural food stores, student cooperatives, alternative schools, Grower’s Market, Saturday Market, and trend-setting non-profit projects. Eugene has always been a center for Eco-activism and the Hippie movement. It was the launching ground for many of Ken Kesey and the Merry Prankster’s ideas and viewpoints. Eugene was also center zone for many Anarchy movements and activism in the late 1990’s. The Whiteaker neighbourhood of West Eugene was a hotspot for a community of anarchists with popularity by 1999 which grew out of the treesits and forest defense camps of the 1990’s, riots, demonstrations such as “Reclaim the Streets”, involvement in Seattle’s WTO riots, and gave Eugene the reputation of being the “Anarchist Capital of the United States”. Within Eugene’s Anarchist movements is a particular branch of anarcho-primitivist movements spearheaded by John Zerzan of Green Anarchy Magazine. Arts, crafts, farming, the University of Oregon, local government, manufacture of recreational vehicles, wood products, and Sacred Heart Medical Center are the largest industries of the area. Many multi-national businesses were created in Eugene such as Hynix Semiconductor America, Shoe Goo, Nike, Taco Time, and Broderbund Software. Eugene is home to many notable festivals such as the Oregon Country Fair, The Annual Eugene Celebration, the SLUG, Art and Vineyard Festival, Lane County Fair, Asian Celebration, Eugene’s Saturday Market, Oregon Bach Festival, Oregon Festival of American Music, Annual Mushroom Festival and Plant Sale, Annual Wildflower Show, the KLCC Microbrew Festival, and Faerieworlds. Eugene was the filming location for numerous films including the 1978’s National Lampoon’s Animal House, The Blues Brothers, Getting Straight, Chicken Salad on Toast, “Drive He Said”, How to Beat the High Cost of Living, Personal Best, Without Limits, Stealing Time, Rennie’s Landing, Zerophilia, and many others.

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American Stonehenge

American Stonehenge
Maryhill, Washington * Contact: Maryhill Museum of Art * 35 Maryhill Museum Drive * Goldendale, Washington 98620 * 509-773-3733 *
by Thomas Baurley

America has several Stonehenges – replicas of the infamous original from the British Isles. The American Stonehenge at Maryhill is one of the most popular sitting atop a lonely bluff overlooking the town of Maryhill, Washington and the length of the Columbia River. It is a full-size identical replica astronomically aligned of the ancient monument of “Stonehenge” in England. It serves as a replica for those who died in World War I and was built by the road engineer, Sam Hill from 1918-1930. It took him 12 years to perfect the monument, dedicating it on July 4, 1918 and completing it in 1929. He passed away shortly after its completion and was buried at the base of bluff below the monument in a difficult to reach location so that he’d be left alone by the tourists he expected to come see his monument. Hill originally built the monument after being mistakenly informed that the original Stonehenge was used for sacrifice. He wanted to symbolize how humanity was still being sacrificed to the God of War. His monument can be seen ominously looming on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River and easily seen by all passerby’s on U.S. Highway 97.

    The dedication plague at the monument reads:
    “In memory of the soldiers of Klickitat County who gave their lives in defense of their country. This monument is erected in the hope that others inspired by the example of their valor and their heroism may share in that love of liberty and burn with that fire of patriotism which death can alone quench.”

Sam Hill also built a mansion nearby that hosts the Maryhill Museum of Art holding monuments of the Klickitat County soldiers who died in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is also the very first monument in the United States to be constructed to honor the dead of World War I. The altar stone is aligned with the sunrise on the Summer Solstice. There is no admission to the Memorial.

American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington.  11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/  American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629 Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151
American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington. 11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629
Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151

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Columbia River

Columbia River

The Columbia River was named after Captain Robert Gray’s ship, the “Columbia Rediviva”. It is also called the “Big River”, “The River of the West”, or “River Oregon”. It flows through Canada in British Columbia, and in the U.S. through the States of Washington and Oregon. Its tributaries are the Spillimacheen River, Beaver River, Illecillewaet River, Incomappleux River, Kootenay River, Pend Oreille River, Spokane River, Snake River, John Day River, Deschutes River, Willamette River, Kicking Horse River, Blaeberry River, Canoe River, Kettle River, Sanpoil River, Okanogan River, Wenatchee River, Yakima River, Lewis River, Kalama River, and Cowlitz River. It is the drainage from the source of “Columbia Lake” in British Columbia. It drains an area of approximately 258,000 square miles including drainage basins from Idaho, British Columbia, Oregon, Washington, and small portions of Montana, Wyoming, Utah, and Nevada. Its median elevation is 2,690 feet above sea level and flows into the Pacific Ocean. IT is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America rising in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia flowing northwest and then south through Washington and Oregon into the Pacific. It is 1,243 miles long. It is the fourth-largest river in the United States and powers over 14 hydroelectric dams. The river historically has been used for trade, transportation, exploration, and economy for thousands of years. Its first recorded inhabitation was more than 15,000 years ago transitioning from hunting and gathering to sedentary lifestyles along the river based mainly on salmon ca. 3,500 years ago. Skeletal remains of the Kennewick Man aged at over 9,000 years ago, were found along the Columbia River sparking debate about origins of human habitation in North America. Many Native Americans inhabit the river valleys including the Sinixt, Lakes, Secwepemc, Ktunaxa, Blackfoot, Colville, Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, Yakama, Nez Perce, Cayuse, Palus, Umatilla, Cowlitz, Chinook, Shoshone Bannock, Nch’ i-Wana, Sahaptin, and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. There was once a land bridge called the “Bridge of the Gods” connecting Oregon and Washington across the Columbia River Gorge that has alot of mythology over its formation and destruction. It was believed to be from a battle between the Gods represented by Mount Adams and Mount Hood and their competition for the affection of the Goddess represented by Mount St. Helens. The bridge originally permitted increased interaction between tribes on the north and south sides of the river until its destruction.

American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington.  11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/  American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629 Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151
American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington. 11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629
Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151


Columbia River

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Ring of Fire (Eugene, Oregon)

Ring of Fire

* 1099 Chambers Street * Eugene, OR 97402-3706 * (541) 344-6475 * www.ringoffirerestaurant.com

A great Thai restaurant on the outskirts of downtown in Eugene, Oregon. Its been awhile since I’ve actually dined there (several years) but recently went for drinks with a friend and pleased by the fabulous service. Had the Thai Iced Tea that was spiked with Vodka. Menu and drinks were a bit pricey, but the ambiance worth its weight. Good service and friendly servers. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Rose and Thistle Fish n’ Chips (Eugene, Oregon)


Rose & Thistle Fish n’ Chips, Eugene, Oregon

Rose and Thistle Fish n’ Chips
* 398 East 11th Avenue * Eugene, OR 97401-3246 * (541) 343-2244 *
A great little mom n’ pop hole in the wall fish n’ chips joint with a British atmosphere. Reminded me a bit of doing fish n’ chips in Britain. The elderly couple that was working appear to be the owners and were very friendly, hospitable, and mixed up a mean seafood combination. I very much enjoyed my visit. I have fond memories of this restaurant from when I used to live in Eugene. Affordable, friendly, and good service. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.


Seafood Combination

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Faerieworlds Winter Celebration 2010: The Good Faeries Masquerade Ball


Good Faeries Masquerade Ball

Good Faeries Masquerade Ball
* January 29th, 2010 * McDonald Theater * Faerieworlds Winter 2010 * Eugene, Oregon *
Blossomed forth from the infamously successful Summer Faerie Festival extravaganza … Faerieworlds … comes a rather new evolution of their festival – The Winter Celebration. Hosted indoors similar to a “Con” rather than a “Festival” … partakers of the merriment gathered together to celebrate Imbolc and the season of Winter with concerts at the McDonald Theater and a marketplace with workshops, activities, and performances at the Lane Events Center in radical Eugene, Oregon. The first night of the event was the “Good Faeries Masquerade Ball” held exclusively in the McDonald Theater. A spectacular event put on by members of the band “Woodland” and the arts phenomena known as Imaginosis combining together to create “Faerieworlds”. The weekend of art, music, and imagination came together beautifully as a select group of faerie artisans had tables in the lobby, a full-service bar downstairs and upstairs in the balcony, and a place to get the concert artists souvenirs and music. Everyone’s costumes were fantastic and appropriately creative to toss one into feeling like one is in the world of the fae. Doors opened at 7:30 pm, and Adam Hurst opened the stage with a great performance at 8:30. Following Adam was the ethereal melodic rhythmns of the Pagan folk band “Woodland” enchanting the audience in faerie bliss from 9-10:30. At 10:45, Vancouver’s (BC) hottest Celtic-India fusion band “Delhi 2 Dublin” took to the stage mixing Celtic and Dub flavors fusing tabla, celtic fiddle, dhol, punjabi vocals, and electric sitar and electronic beats. Dancing was fantastic. The audience was captivated until a little after midnight when the Ball ended. Great evening of enjoyment. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.


Good Faeries Masquerade Ball

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Dollar Rental Car (PDX)

Dollar Rent-A-Car
( Portland International Airport )
I’ve always been a BUDGET Rent-A-Car man, but this time I wandered outside of my usual to Carrentals.com and was lured over to Dollar for cost and a deal that had Budget quite beat. $67 Lock-n-Low special from Thursday late night through Sunday early evening. Since I’m not a credit card user, their web site said they only took a $250 hold on funds from your debit card vs. Budget’s $300 hold. I’m a budget traveller and that $50 difference is a world of difference for me. I completely disagree with the pirate-tactics of car rental agencies to lock your bank account funds in such a way when using debit cards instead of credit – but unfortunately the industry has us trapped. Dollar at least appears more sympathetic by having a lower hold fee. There was no line or wait at the Portland airport to pick up my car. The agent was very friendly (though tried to get me to add in extras) and hooked me up with a nice subaru (see above picture). The car was very new, clean, with heated seats, electric windows, sunroof, great sound system, and all the perks you’ve come to love in a vehicle. I loved my rental. The check-out process was streamlined. Oddly though when he checked me out, he stated you couldn’t leave the state of Oregon or Washington. It didn’t matter for this trip since I was just staying in Oregon – but in the future could see a problem with that. Unlimited Mileage and affordable prices. No problems with the car. It was a very nice ride. Check in was very efficient, streamlined, and got my receipt quickly. I had a very positive experience with Dollar. Thank you Dollar! Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5. Well counted my blessings too soon: They took the $250 debit card hold and charged it, the day AFTER I returned the vehicle. No charge for the $67 has appeared on my statement as of this writing (2/3/10) but they took my $250 and still have not returned it. After this experience, I’ve become wary of Dollar. Especially since after an hour of phone calls with them yesterday (2/2/10) ending in no resolution. They said it could take 2-5 days before refunding the money they were supposed to get a credit hold on and release the day the car was returned but instead cashed and are holding out on crediting back. As of this point, the company has made a 2 out of 5 rating as of this date (2/3/10). Rating: 2 stars out of 5 ~ Trust not what the representatives state and be very wary of their accounting techniques. In addition, for the Portland Office – they manage their own accounting. The Manager “Reza” was rude and not helpful, argued with me that he indeed submitted the payback, which according to my bank has not been submitted. With staff such as “Reza” – Dollar is bound to be heading downhill. Continue reading Dollar Rental Car (PDX)

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Faerieworlds 2009 (Mt. Pisgah, Eugene, Oregon)

Faerieworlds 2009
http://www.faerieworlds.com
* http://www.myspace.com/faerieworlds * July 31st – August 2, 2009 * Mt. Pisgah Arboretum * 34901 Frank Parrish Road * Eugene, OR 97405 * Just off I-5, exit 189
Each year towards the close of summer arrives and opens a gateway between the worlds allowing mortals and faeries to dance and frolick together. One such event is “Faerieworlds”. A unique festival, hosted by Kelly & Emilio Miller-Lopez (Woodland), Robert Gould (Imaginosis), Kimmy Smith (Woodland), crew, and volunteers; always with the artistic presence of Brian and Wendy Froud; has recently been held over the last several years in the grassroots & environmentally conscious haven of Eugene, Oregon. Themed over the celebration of Faeries, music, art, and creativity; Faerieworlds also has a very deep dedication and connection with nature. Embedded within the amazing plethera of talent that they bring in every year is also a magnitude of earth-based ritual and celebration honoring our ancestors, the spirits of nature, and the Deities of the world. Teamed together with the amazing talent of the Mythmakers these ceremonies are more than phenomenal and theatrically better performed than most festivals of its genre have ever offered from my Technogypsie wanderlust experiences. When Faerieworlds boasts that its often hard to tell the difference between the performers and the attendees, they aren’t kidding at all. Everyone dresses up and comes in Faerie, Fantasy, or period costumery that puts any Renaissance Faire to pity (especially since 90% of the attendees dress up); making the creative artistic experience of dressing up one of the biggest attractions of the event. According to Brian Froud: “To dress as a faerie, donning wings, is to actively join in the dance, to be connected to creative spirit. Graceful or ecstatic dance; the radiant, rhythmic heartbeat; friendship; music; all these move easily across the boundaries, transcending language, race, and time. Such activities extend a joyful hand across the threshold. At Faerieworlds, we ring the bells of faerie invitation. The people come. More importantly, the faeries come too.” The event organizers believe that ‘revitalizing, healing, and transforming spirit of faerie is alive and moving actively in our lives: faerie inspires and provokes, heals and reveals, illuminates and transcends.’ (Faerieworlds web site)

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Breitenbush River & Detroit Lake, Oregon

Breitenbush River & Detroit Lake, Oregon
Through the Mount Jefferson Wilderness of the enchanting Cascades of Central Oregon lies a spiritual river known as the Breitenbush. It spurs off the North Santiam River in western Oregon draining one of Oregon’s most rugged Cascadian forests just east of Salem. The Breitenbush river comes from several short forks and it is the South Fork Breitenbush River that begins with creeks from Bays and Russell Lake at the elevation of 6,000 ft flowing West-Northwest. The North Fork Breitenbush River is the most popular as it beigns at Breitenbush Lake joining with another fork passing by Pyramid Lake and is where the infamous Breitenbush Hotsprings reside. The North and South forks flow together just east of the community of Breitenbush where they weave together in a wrapping twisting rhythm of love where they join the North Santiam at Detroit; and its lower 2 miles cut what is now Detroit Lake that is created by the Detroit Dam. Detroit Lake is a reservoir created by the Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River. It’s located roughly 46 miles southeast of Oregon’s capital city – Salem. The lake rests atop the old historical road bed of the former Oregon Pacific Railroad which was built by Colonel T. Egenton Hogg. But due to funding issues, the line never made it past Idanha which was southeast of the lake. The lake was created in 1953 with the completion of the dam, washing out where the railroad sat, now holding 455,000 acre-feet of water when full. This 9-mile (14 km) long lake has shoreline of 32 miles (51 km) when full. Its a very popular location for watersports, swimming, jet-skiing, water-skiing, fishing, and boating. Oregon’s Fish and Wildlife stock the dam with over 125,000 catchable rainbow trout, fingerling rainbow, kokanee and chinook salmon. The lake itself breeds a large population of brown bullhead catfish. Detroit Lake is designated as one of the 32 lakes in the United States for recreation as managed by the U.S. Forestry Service. At a surface elevation of 1,450 feet the lake can seasonally rise to 1,569 feet. Definitely a lake I’d like to spend more time at in the future. Beautiful.


Detroit Lake drained during winter

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Breitenbush Hotsprings



Breitenbush Hotsprings * PO Box 578 * Detroit, OR 97342 *www.breitenbush.com
A very restful and relaxing intentional community and resort nestled in the Oregon wilderness. It is a retreat and a conference center that is worker-owned community that specializing in spiritual retreats and holistic healing. Surrounded by the Willamette National Forest it is indeed a piece of paradise in the woods. It is located 10 miles up in the hills from Detroit, Oregon and about 50 miles away from the capital of Oregon (Salem). The resort was built atop the natural geothermal springs known as the Breitenbush hotsprings which feed into the Breitenbush river. Its a serene and beautiful place with great spots for meditation, healing, and contemplation. It certainly gave me the rest and relaxation I needed for the leg of my pilgrimmage to Faerieworlds. Unfortunately I didn’t take many pictures, as I wasn’t sure what the policy was, and only took pictures when no one was around which was extremely a rare occasion. Especially since it is also a naturalist resort down by the water at least, which is usually symbollic of no-photography. According to the resort, the springs was a frequent gathering place of local tribes. The tribes were apparently pushed out by Hudson’s Bay Company trappers who homesteaded it in 1904. Merle Bruckman purchased the site in 1927 and created the resort. It closed in 1972 after two devastating floods. Purchased in 1977 by Alex Beamer who wanted to host a full time community on site. The community took it over in 1985. The average temperature of the springs subsurface is 356 F (180 C) and contains minerals such as sulfate, calcite, analcime, anhydrite, chalcedony, microcline, muscovite, quartz, wairakite, potassium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and lithium. The surface temperature of the springs is about 180 F (82 C)the lower temperature due to heat transfer to cooler rock near the earth’s surface. The buildings at the Springs are heated from one of two of the wells. The retreat and conference center, founded in 1981, is a very counter-culture popular venue for many events, gatherings, festivals, holistic/spiritual/New Age retreats. The grounds has springs, spas, hot mud baths, and saunas – plus a river for cooling off – all clothing optional. There are 7 hot tubs and a sauna open to the guests, and a private one for the workers. The sauna is a small wood house with slatted floors over a hot springs creet that sits 12. There are over 20 miles of hiking trails, rustic cabins, a lodger, tent platforms, a meditative labyrinth, a sanctuary, a gift shop, and a conference center. Services include massage, yoga classes, meditation, community vegetarian dinners, and other healing arts. The community is based on sustainability and generates its own hydropower electricity. Cell phones, televisions, and non-satellite radios do not work and there is no internet. All buildings are heated by geothermal energy. The community runs and manages it year round living on the 154 acre site. There are roughly 50-70 community members. New members are accepted by a community consensus after a year of work and paying a deposit. The place is pretty amazing and definitely one of my new hotspots to visit. Rating: 4 stars out of 5. (August 2009) Another visit, this time during winter towards the end of January in 2010 I found a very pleasant visit with brisk dips in the hotsprings, a steamy sauna, and catching up with friends. The Vegetarian buffet in the main hall was delicious. Definitely a wonderful time. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5. (1/29/2010)


Me on the Breitenbush River @ Breitenbush Hotsprings

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Powell’s Bookstore (Portland, Oregon)


Powell’s Bookstore

Powell’s Bookstore 1005 W Burnside Portland, OR 97209 USA
http://www.powells.com/
One of the world’s largest collections of new and used books in buildings that encompass a city block plus, this store holds over a million books. Nine color coded rooms house over 3,500 different sections, offering something for every interest, including an incredible selection of out-of-print and hard-to-find titles. Each month, the Basil Hallward Art Gallery (located upstairs in the Pearl Room) hosts a new exhibit, as well as dozens of author events featuring acclaimed writers, artists, and thinkers such as Roddy Doyle, Susan Sontag, Robert Olen Butler, Annie Leibovitz, and former President Jimmy Carter. The City’s Rare Book Room gathers autographed first editions and other collectible volumes for readers in search of a one-of-a-kind treasure. This of course is my all time favorite bookstore. A must to visit anytime in Portland. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

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Trader Joes (downtown Portland, Oregon)


Trader Joes downtown Portland


Downtown Portland Trader Joes (971) 544-0788 2122 NW Glisan St, Portland, Oregon http://www.traderjoes.com/
Ah Trader Joe’s … my favorite neighbourhood grocery store. Though not a single one in my currently resident state of Colorado. I have to drive to Albuquerque or Santa Fe, New Mexico to get to it. Or fly here to Portland or Seattle. So anytime I’m in a town with Trader Joes’ you gotta know I’ll hit it. Its a grocery store and so much more – shelves stocked with delicious and wholesome foods that puts Whole Foods to shame. Ranging from milk n’ bread to exotic fares like imported cheeses, organic produce, oddities, cultural foods, and hand-tossed pizza from Italy. In addition to the variety, notorious for its liquor selection, though this Oregon store only seemed to have beer and wine. The prices are fantastically cheap. Unbeatable. Puts Costco and Sams club to shame in my opinion with quality and price. This is why I’m a dedicated Trader Joes’ patron and I’d drive several hours to go shopping at their locations. Someday perhaps Colorado will get one. Till then the wanderlust will be satiated. This store is in walking distance from the Youth hostel and has a wide selection. Great shop. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

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