Category Archives: Irish

Jack Quinn’s Irish Pub (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Jack Quinn’s Irish Pub
~ 21 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 ~ (719) 385-0766 ~ https://jackquinnspub.com/ ~

Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

One of Colorado Springs’ landmark Irish pub locations with a very comfortable relaxed environment full of songs, traditional cuisine, dancing, and jigs. It is the central location where the local Irish meet, greet, and sing. Outside of being too crowded and not finding a seat, the establishment has never let me down for fun, frolick, and good times. Perfect place to meet friends and have fun. Great service, friendly staff, and all out great business. Rated: 5 stars out of 5 Visited 2/25/11.

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Birthday Celebration at Jack Quinn’s (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=36255) with the family: The Great Walkabout: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?page_id=114. From Colorado Springs to Australia, Europe, and back. Photos taken February 25, 2011. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2011 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Cork Butter Museum

Cork Butter Museum
Cork Butter Museum

Cork Butter Museum
O’ Connell Square, Shandon, Cork, Ireland
+353 (0) 21 4300600 * www.corkbutter.museum

One of the most intriguing and interesting museums in Cork is the Butter Museum. My fiancee was quick to take me up the hill to this unsual museum that covers the history of Ireland’s most important food export and the world’s largest butter market. It’s definitely worth a gander and is enriching with the history of farming, commerce, and finance in Ireland. It doesn’t just focus on the food culture of early Ireland, but also covers the growth of Cork as a food trade center. The history of butter making is covered with a feature audio-visual presentation on Irish Butter, as well as a plethera of artifacts throughout history used in butter and food production. It can be done in about an hour, and only will cost you about 4 Euros to wander about. Rating: 3 stars out of 5.

Butter Churn
Butter Churn

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Tayto

Tayto Crisps
Tayto Crisps

Tayto Crisps

I find the whole British (count that Irish, Welsh, and Scottish) use of the term “Crisps” for “Chips” pretty humorous, but that’s probably because I’m American where crisps are called “chips”. You know, those “deeply fried” light slivers of potatoes we add to our calorie-infested food type called “junk food”. We serve them as a snack, appetizer, or side dish. They are cooked, salted, and “enhanced” with herbs, spices, chemicals, and artificial additives. Ok, and seasonings. The Americans, Australians, New Zealander’s, Canadians, Singapore, South African, and Jamaican English call them “potato chips” or “chips”, the British and Hiberno English call them “crisps”, and Indian English call them “chips” or “wafers”. But the terminology is not as funny to me as much as the iconography and slogans I’ve seen on Irish crisps. The first time I experienced Irish crisps was with the Hunky Dorys Crisps during my first trip to Ireland in 2010.

So upon my newly acquired Irish friendship circle, every one of them raved about “Taytos”. “Have you had Taytos?” they would say. I’d reply … “No I haven’t.” That was changed one day by my Irish fiancee who broadened my horizons on this dastardly deadly snack. I have to say, they are quite yummy, though high calorie and not good for you in any regard (as with all other “potato chips” … excuse me “crisps”.) The “Taytos” are considered a cultural phenomena of Ireland, so much that many Irish call these “chips” or “crisps” simply “taytos”.

These “Tayto” crisps are made in Ulster at the 500 year old infamous Tayto Castle where the mighty O’Hanlon clan once resided. After much turmoil, battles, siezes, and a very interesting history, the castle was bought in 1955 by Irish businessman Thomas Hutchinson. The following year, he decided to make a new potato product called “crisps” and began manufacturing them right there in that very castle. By 1964, Tayto created various different flavored crisps such as “Smoky Bacon” and “Prawn Cocktail” which became their most popular. To promote the crisps was invented the comical potato-head called “Mr. Tayto” who has become a well loved face across Northern Ireland (and the Republic of Ireland as well). If you ask me, seems to be a rip-off of Mr. Potatohead which was developed in 1949 and popularized by 1952. The mascot “Mr. Tayto” was used in numerous advertising campaigns, even up to this date. In 2007 during the Irish General Election, they ran a advertising campaign with Mr. Tayto as a fake election candidate and even claimed some really did vote for him, causing spoiled votes in the Carlow-Kilkenny constituency. This led to Tayto getting fined during the campaign for littering due to their fake election posters posted in public places. In 2009 Tayto Ltd. published the book “The Man Inside the Jacket” as a fictional autobiography of “Mr. Tayto”.

The company is split between a Northern Ireland plant and a Republic of Ireland plant. Both companies operate entirely separately even though they have a similar range of products. The Northern Ireland manufacturer is called “Tayto” Limited based out of Tandragee in County Armagh and was formed in 1956. They employ over 300 at their plant in the Tandragee Castle representing the largest and most popular “crisp” brand in Northern Ireland and the third largest in the United Kingdom. They licensed the name and recipes of “Tayto” in the Republic of Ireland. In 2006, the Northern Ireland Tayto acquired Corby and Scunthorpe sites of the former Golden Wonder business producing mini Pringles for Proctor and Gamble. By 2007 they acquired Sirhowy Valley Foods Ltd who make “Real Crisps” products. In 2008 they acquired Red Mill Snack foods pushing them to become the 3rd largest crisp manufacturer in the United Kindgom. In 2009 they acquired Jonathan Crisp, the trading name of Natural Crisps Ltd. They produce their signature brand of “Cheese and Onion” flavored crisps like their counterpart in Ireland. They also offer “beef & onion”, “ready salted”, “smoky bacon”, “salt & vinegar”, “worcester sauce”, “prawn cocktail”, “spring onion”, “roast chicken”, and “pickled onion” flavored crisps. The Republic of Ireland plant claims it was founded by Joe Murphy in 1954. This company was owned by Cantrell & Cochrane (based in Coolock County Dublin) then outsourced by Largo Foods in 2005 until they were purchased by Largo Foods in 2006 for €62.3 million euro. They too, offer the Tayto crisps in various flavors, as “Cheese & Onion”, “Salt & Vinegar”, “Smokey Bacon”, “Ready Salted”, “Prawn Cocktail”, and the limited edition “Tex Mex”. By the 2000’s they attempted to target the health food market with low fat and salt crisps they originally branded as “Honest” and currently refer to these as the “Happy and Healthy range”. In this range they also sell “Nuts and Popcorn Range”, “Popcorn Pleasure”, “Salted Peanuts”, “Dry roasted Peanuts”, “Bacon Fries”, “Snacks Range”, “Snax”, “Mighty Munch”, “Chipsticks”, “Ketchips”, “Waffles”, “Wheelies”, “Jonny Onion Rings”, “Snaps”, “Happy and Healthy Range”, “Treble Crunch Farmhouse Cheddar & Spring Onion”, “Treble Crunch Sour Cream & Onion”, “Velvet Crunch”, “Sharing Range”, “Bistro Cheese & Onion”, “Bistro Caribbean Chutney”, “Occasions Thai Sweet Chilli”, “Occasions Mature Cheddar Cheese and Red Onion”, “Occasions Tortillas Nacho Cheese”, and “Occasions Tortilla Original Cool”. They opened a theme park called “Tayto Park” in Ashbourne, County Meath.

Bibliography/Recommended reading:


  • Baurley, Thomas; McGowan, Leaf; et al. “Hunky Dorys Crisps” 2010: Technogypsie.com Productions; Colorado Springs, Colorado. www.technogypsie.com.
  • Tayto. Website referenced January 2012. http://www.tayto.com/.
  • Tayto Crisps. Website referrenced January 2012. http://www.taytocrisps.ie/.

  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia ~ “Tayto”. Web site referenced January 2012. en.wikipedia.org. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tayto_(Republic_of_Ireland) & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tayto_(Northern_Ireland)/


Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

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The Pale Pub


The Pale
* 13 High Street * Dublin 2 * Dublin, Ireland * (01) 6773207 * www.thepalepub.com *

A pit stop ino this two-story pub in the heart if the Medieval district for some traditional Irish pub fare. The staff is very friendly, the pub spacious, and for an afternoon/early evening not too crowded on a weekday. The main bartender was quite witty. Some say he’s kissed the Blarney Stone. I sat atop upstairs. Upstairs its decorated like a sportsbar which is not so much of my preference but that was fine. Food was good and service great. Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.

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The Ginger Man

The Ginger Man
* 40 Fenian St * Dublin 2, Co. Dublin, Ireland * 01 6766388 *

A great little pub on Fenian Street behind the Davenport Hotel. Traditional Irish Pub on the interior with a nice front patio seating section. I stumbled in for a brief lunch and a pint of cider finding hospitality and relaxation. It was bustling with locals, students, and professionals so wound up sharing a table with a couple locals. Service was decent speed and friendly while I was there, but I heard that once packed it can get slow. I sat out in the front outdoor patio as it was a nice day. The Shepherd’s Pie I ordered was quite tasty. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Copper Alley Bistro



Copper Alley Bistro
* 2, Lord Edward Street, Dublin Dublin 2, Ireland * +353 1 677 0602 * www.hardinghotel.ie *

A great little Bistro I enjoyed a hearty meal at while exploring the Medieval district and walking on into the Temple Bar district. It is located right near Christ Church Cathedral. The site itself dates to the 13th century, along a early Viking street that was later called “Parson’s Lane” in the 15th century. By the 17th Century it was called “Copper Ally” because of the money that was minted here. The district was notorious for its taverns and restaurants as well as entertainment. This little Bistro has a friendly staff and are quick to get the food to the table. It was quite a nice rest break from sightseeing. Their menu has Traditional Irish fare, steaks, seafood, chicken, and vegetarian offerings. The Bistro is open 7:30 until noon for breakfast on mondays through fridays, and from 8-12 on Saturdays and Sundays. Lunch is served Noon until 3 pm, with dinners from Noon until 9:30 pm. Rating: 4.50 stars out of 5.


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Brazenhead Pub Dublin


The Brazen Head, Dublin, Ireland

The Brazenhead
* 20 Lower Bridge Street * Dublin 8 * Telephone: +353 (0) 1 6779549 / 6795186 * www.brazenhead.com *
The pub professes to be the oldest Pub in Dublin. The site of the pub dates to 1198 as some sort of public house. The building itself is from 1688 and may have been preceded by numerous taverns, one after another, as it is a good location for them. There are alot of old history surrounding the building from the piece of graffiti where John Langan etched his name and date. Michael Collins and Wolfe Tone met here. This is considered to be one of Ireland’s traditional Irish pubs. A hangout of tourists as well as locals, and legal professionals, he pub has live folk music sessions there almost nightly. It is believed to be a haunted pub wih apparitions wandering about. One of which is believed to be Robert Emmet. James Joyce, Brendan Behan, Jonathan Swift, Robert Emmet, Wolfe Tone, Daniel O’Connell, Van Morrison, Hothouse Flowers, Mary Black, Garth Brooks, and Michael Collins have hung out here.

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Farrington’s Pub of Temple Bar (Dublin)

Farrington’s Pub of Temple Bar
* 28 Essex St E * Dublin 2, Co. Dublin, Ireland * 01 671 5135 * http://www.thesmithgroup.ie/farringtons/index.html *

A late night meal with some friends after a crazy road trip around Ireland found fellowship, cheers, and relaxation at the Farrington’s Pub in Temple Bar. Even though we arrived late to the upper restaurant/bar and was just about the cease food serving, they found patience to take care of us as most of our party settled in on the Traditional Irish breakfast for dinner. A very pleasant pub mixing style of a Victorian bar with elements over 120 years old downstairs and a modern comfortable lounge on the 2nd floor, this unique pub is located in the heart of Dublin’s Temple Bar district and is named after the character “Farrington” in Jame Joyce’s “The Dubliners”. The pub is open mondays through thursdays from 10:30 to 23:30, and fridays and saturdays from 10:30 until 2:30, and sundays from 12:30 until 23:00. In addition to pub dining, they have luxury accommodation available in 5 ensuite bedrooms upstairs.

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Blender’s Brown Sauce



Brown Sauce


Blender’s Brown Sauce

I experienced this sauce and condiment while visiting Ireland and found it yet an intriguing different culinary choice around the world. Americans like Ketchup on their fries, The English like Mayonnaise, the Canadians and Germans like vinegar, and the Irish seem to like Brown Sauce; or so it appears. Rating: 3 stars out of 5.


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Northern Ireland’s Ormo Pancakes off the shelf

Northern Ireland’s ORMO Pancakes
Pancakes on the shelf
* Convenience store in Bushmills, Northern Ireland * http://www.yourormo.com/ *

A unique Northern Ireland treat where you can buy pre-packaged already cooked, just-heat-up instant pancakes from off the shelf. Made by “Ormo pancakes” you can butter straight from the packet, or toast and butter, top with icea cream, fruit, or what-not. The products are baked in South Belfast and spread throughout storefronts in Northern Ireland, whipping up the batter since 1875. Established by Robert Wilson with his brother Samuel, creating a bakery called Wilson and Strain, which evolved into Ormeau Bakery in 1875, and becoming a Northern Ireland favorite for over a century.

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Mega Meanies (Ireland)



Mega Meanies


Mega Meanies
Ireland

I discovered this odd Irish Crisp in a convenient mart outside of Newgrange. They are a inexpensive junk/snack food and are similar to crisps sold out there. However, rather than from potatoes, these crisps are made from corn and wheat wih a flavoring to taste like pickled onions. They are manufactured by the Irish arm of KP snacks and can only be purchased in Ireland even though at one time was available throughout the UK. Shaped like little monsters … they pack a weird taste. Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.


Mega Meanies

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Hunky Dorys Crisps


Hunky Dory’s Chips or Crisps:

While travelling in Ireland this summer, I came across this gem of the junk food market. The tongue-in-cheek, comical ad-campaigned, potato chip or crisp known as “Hunky Dorys”. They are the number 1 crinkle cut crisp brand in Ireland. They were established in 1996 and are popular for their sayings, labellings, advertising stunts, and strong flavours. While potato chips were invented by Americans (August 24, 1853 – Saratoga Springs, New York) they found exotic flavoring in the United Kingdom (first seasoned by the Smiths Potato Crisps Company in 1920). Americans, Australians, Canadian English, and many Europeans call them Potato Chips or simply “chips”, the British and Irish English call them “Crisps”, since “Chips” are “Fries” to them. Thin slices of potato deeply fried or baked until crispy. In parts of regular Ireland, the word “Tayto” is synonymous with “crisps” after the Tayto brand most commonly found in Ireland. Because the word “Tayto” is so common in the Irish market, it has become a genericized trademark. Hunky Dorys is the next popular brand to Taytos, next to King Crisps. In Irish, crisps are known as criospaí. Hunky Dorys utilizes racy and risky advertising slogans to sell their chips. Most recently criticized for the Irish Rugby campaign for the use of sexually themed ads depicting women playing rugby as they show off their cleavage with a bag of Hunky Dory crisps in the foreground, with an ending “Are you staring at my Crisps?” This particular ad slogan caused alot of problems for the chip company. Creative and comical labelling appears on their bags stating things like: “Storage conditions: Treat Hunky Dorys like Gremlins. Keep them cool, dry, & away from bright lights & Strong Flavours”; “Allergy Advice: Doesn’t contain Kryponite (but does contain wheat gluten)”. Rating: 3 stars out of 5.


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Gallagher’s Boxty Restaurant / The Boxty House (Dublin)

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The Boxty House
* 21 Temple Bar * 2, Co. Dublin, Ireland * 01 6772762 * http://www.boxtyhouse.ie/ *
Well as you’ll see from the below rating (click more) the Boxty House has changed, and is not as sensational as it was in 2010 when I last visited. While the name on the front of the store has changed from Gallagher’s Boxty House to “The Boxty House” and the decor/image is all different, the waiter swore it was all the same place as before with a new look. The food however has changed as well. When I visited in 2010 I was sold on the fact this was “traditional Irish fare” and since gaining an Irish wife, was told that this was not typical Irish fare. So the restaurant is riddled with curiosity and intriguing advertising. However, the dining experience was enjoyable, albeit slow service. The food was still good, just not tantalizing as it was when I presume Gallagher was running it. The seafood Boxty was replaced with a Seafood dumpling boxty? which was nothing in comparison. Even the cider seemed to change – that however was still thirst quenching and delicious. Still high priced, tourist bent, that has not changed. Rating: 3 stars out of 5. Visited 12/9/13. [Rating:3]

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The Druid (Nuremberg, Germany)



The Druid
* Weißgerbergasse 18 * 90403 Nürnberg, Germany * +49 911 2059072 * www.thedruidpub.com

A great little Irish/English pub in the heart of the Nurnberg Old Town. It’s an authentic traditional Irish pub located on one of the most beautiful medieval streets in the city; housed in a four story 12th century building, next to Club Sixteen; it encompassed the first two floors and basement. Decorated with old timber, uneven stairs, and rough stone walls – it brings the charm of Ireland into Germany. Great whiskey and cottage pie. I’ve heard good things about the fish n’ chips and the beer as well. Staff was great. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

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Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 10, Part A – The Keys of Worms, The Nibelungen

Section A


The Sacred Key of Worms

Saturday, 4 April 2009
Worms, Germany

      iWorms comes from “Lindwurn” or “Dragon slain by Siegfried under the linden tree.”

      “Yet more I know of Seigfried that well your your ear may hold.
      Beneath the lindeu tree he slew the dragon bold;

      Then in its blood he bathed him, which turned to horn his skin,
      So now no weapon harms him, as oft hath proven been.”
      ~ Nibelungen, st. 104.

    Early to rise the adventuring party awoke refreshed and rejuvenated at the Jugendgästehaus Worms. Quite satisfied with their rest and their lodging in the wonderful historic city of dragons, the explorers went to seek out more insight from the city dragons, delve into the legends of the Nibelungen and the dragon slayers in hopes of finding out about the “sacred key” that their quest is in search of. Two breakfast halls greeted the party downstairs with slices of bread, lunch meats, cheese, yogurt, cereal, milk, and coffee. A brief breakfast was had and the adventurers walked out in search of the Nibelungen museum.

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    The Owl n’ Thistle (Seattle, Washington)

    Owl and Thistle, Irish Pub * http://www.owlnthistle.com/ * 808 Post Ave * Seattle, Washington 98104

    A quaint little hole-in-the-wall pub down by the docks in downtown Seattle, off Marion and Post has the typical Irish pub festivities one would expect: drinkin’, hollerin’, and party’ing. Good music, good times. Staff very friendly and great cheap food specials before 6 pm. I had the fish n’ chips – which were pretty good as well as the fries, though meager portions. The blueberry vodka n’ tonic was pretty good was well. Apparently got me smelling like blueberries through the evening. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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