Category Archives: USA

America, a.k.a. The United States (of) is a republic in the Northwestern hemisphere of the Planet Earth, that comprises of 48 conterminous states, the District of Columbia, Alaska in North America, and Hawaii in the North Pacific. It is bordered to the East by the Atlantic Ocean, to the West by the Pacific Ocean, Canada to the North, and Mexico to the south. There are an estimated 267,954,767 citizens of this country that expands an massive land expanse in the conterminous states consisting of 3,022,387 sq. mi. (7,827,982 sq. km); with Alaska and Hawaii, 3,615,122 sq. mi. (9,363,166 sq. km). The Capital of the U.S.A. is Washington, D.C. which pretty much composes the entire District of Columbia. “The United States” as it is called, was colonized by a plethera of Europeans from Spain, The Netherlands, France, and Great Britain, that took the land from the Aboriginal inhabitants (often referred to as “Native Americans”), starting in the 16th century and gaining their independence in 1776. Climate: mostly temperate, but tropical in Hawaii and Florida and arctic in Alaska, semiarid in the great plains west of the Mississippi River and arid in the Great Basin of the southwest; low winter temperatures in the northwest are ameliorated occasionally in January and February by warm chinook winds from the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains. Terrain: vast central plain, mountains in west, hills and low mountains in east; rugged mountains and broad river valleys in Alaska;
rugged, volcanic topography in Hawaii. Obtained from, and more references, statistics, and information can be found at http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=United%20States.Visit Leaf McGowan’s Virtual Tourist Page …. Travelling abroad, Living as an Expat, Visit Expatexchange.com.

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Mazatlan Family Mexican Restaurant

Matzatlan Family Mexican Restaurant
~ 828 NE Hwy 101, Lincoln City, Oregon 97361 * 541-996-6090 * http://www.mazatlan.rest/ ~

A great family restaurant located off of Highway 101 – family run, family owned for over 25 years with a tradition of recipes and delights. We enjoyed our visit and myself the Chimichanga and enchiladas were great. I can’t remember if they had Sopapillas, as there was somewhere along the Oregon Coast I had the most delightful. Good times.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Lincoln City, Oregon

Lincoln City, Oregon

A bustling little city along the Oregon Coast and Highway 101 in Lincoln County, Oregon between Tillamook and Newport. Lincoln City had a population of around 8,500 in 2016. This area was originally homeland of the Siletz Tribe. The city is named after the county which is named after President Lincoln, though named by a contest from local school children. The city was in incorporated March 1965 as a means to unite the coastal towns of Delake, Ocean Lake, and Taft as well as the communities of Nelscott and Cutler City. The main industries in the area is retirement and tourism. The Siletz casino was founded in 1995 bringing in more tourism. The Salishan Spa and Golf Resort offers dining, shopping, cabins, lodges, and a five star golf course. Lincoln City hosts two annual kite festivals in June and October giving the city the nickname of “Kite Capital of the World. There is also the Siletz Bay Music Festival held here in Late June and early July.

Lodging:

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Lincoln City, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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Super 8

Super 8 Motels
~ Worldwide ~

I’ve spent many nights at the Super 8 – some locations are amazing, others can be seedy. It depends on the city and the manager, neighborhood, and environment. They are one of the world’s largest budget hotel chains – with motels throughout the United States, Canada, and China. They are part of the Wyndham Worldwide chain. The chain was started by Dennis Brown in 1972 alongside his partner Ron Rivett in 1973. They started renting rooms for $8.88/night which gave name to “Super 8”. The first motel was in Aberdeen South Dakota, hosting 60 rooms in 1974. It had a stucco exterior with an English Tudor style inspired by Rivett’s father-in-law who did stucco construction for a living, the remaining architecture was created by Rivett. Through the years they kept the English Tudor style as well as locating themselves near Holiday Inn’s as a marketing strategy. The first franchise was sold in 1976 in Gillette, Wyoming. They broke out of the Midwest in 1978 opening up in New York and Washington State. In 1976 they created a VIP club program which was later purchased by Hospitality Franchise Systems, then Cendant in 1993. This was dissolved in 2003 and replaced by TripRewards converting to Wyndham Rewards in 2008. By 2014 they had over 2,390 hotels. They opened their first hotel in China during 2004 in Beijing. They offer their guests standard amenities including free WiFi, a continental breakfast, hair dryers, coffee makers, laundry, and a lobby. Some locations have pools and meeting rooms, while some of the larger Super 8’s have restaurants.

Locations I’ve visited:

  • Lincoln City, Oregon: 3517 N, US-101, Lincoln City, OR 97367; (541) 996-9900. Rating: 4 stars out of 5. This location has a fabulous tourism placement across from a public beach. Its a rather small building and hotel with few rooms. Its less than a mile from the Chinook Winds casino. They have mini-fridges and microwaves in the room, coin laundry, free coffee, truck parking, and a small conference room. Its located along Highway 101.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Depoe Bay, Oregon

Depoe Bay, Oregon
~ World’s smallest Harbor ~

A small little harbour village in Lincoln County Oregon along U.S. Route 101. The village possesses amazing views of the Pacific Ocean. It had a population of around 1400 residents in 2010. The village is approximately 6 acres in size. It is well known as the “World’s smallest navigable harbor”. Depoe Bay was named after “Charley Depot”, a Siletz Indian who originally allotted the land in 1894 under the Dawes Act of 1887. He worked a military depot near Toledo Oregon and became well known in the area. The film “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” filmed their fishing trip sequence here in 1975 as well as restaurant scenes from the “Burning Plain” in 2008. The port was damaged by a tsunami during the Tohoku earthquake off Japan on March 11, 2011.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Depot Bay, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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Yaquina Bay Lighthouse (Newport, Oregon)

"Yaquina Head's light is 81'2" (25 m) above the ground and 162' (49 m) above mean sea level;
“Yaquina Head’s light is 81’2” (25 m) above the ground and 162′ (49 m) above mean sea level; the top of the tower is 10′ (3 m) higher still.

Yaquina Bay Lighthouse:

    “The Yaquina Bay Lighthouse was built in 1871, this lighthouse is the oldest building in Newport. It operated for only three years – until the lighthouse here was built. The restored lighthouse is a popular attraction in Yaquina Bay State Park” ~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon.

“Yaquina Head’s light is 81’2” (25 m) above the ground and 162′ (49 m) above mean sea level; the top of the tower is 10′ (3 m) higher still. Higher is better – On America’s rugged west coast, keeping lights low enough to be seen under the fog was often a problem. However if they were placed too low, they couldn’t be seen far enough away to be useful. The higher a light is, the further it can be seen at sea. At 162 feet (49 m) above sea level, Yaquina Head’s light can be seen about 19 miles (32 km) out to sea. Late nights at the office – Imagine spending all of a long winter’s night sitting on a stiff chair 70 feet (21 m) up in the tower watching the light. Now try to imagine doing it in the years before there was radio, tv, or even electricity! The buildings attached to the light tower has two rooms which once served as the ‘oil room and office’ however the keepers stood nightly watch in the tower itself. Still lighting the way: Many ships and boats continue to depend on lighthouses for navigational aid. Equipment in the small building attached to the light tower keeps a light on in case the electricity fails. A small battery-powered back up light is attached to the railing surrounding the lantern deck – you can see it from the observation deck at the base of the tower. By modern standards, the regular routine of a lighthouse keeper was monotonous. It was however sometimes interrupted by unexpected moments of drama. ‘last night lightning struck the office and storeroom building. it tore off the copper, lead, and shingles where the root joins on to the tower …’ keeper’s log, Yaquina head, Oct 18 1920. By 10 am every day the lighthouse lamp was refueled and its five wicks trimmed. Throughout the day, the lens and windows were cleaned and repairs made to keep everything shipshape. At dusk the lamp was lit and then watched from the watch room until sunrise. What else did keepers do? they greeted tourists ‘ … sea quite smooth. keepers painting the watchroom and working the road today, had two visitors today.’ – keeper’s log Yaquina head, april 28, 1877. They submitted to inspections: ‘…they never knew when an inspector was going to come. He came about four times each year. He would just come in the house like he belonged there and he would go through it just to see if the women kept the houses up.’ – Philena Nelson, friend of the keeper’s children 1916-1918. They painted, and painted some more ‘ keeper’s painting the bracketts and getting stage (scaffold) ready and mixing paint to paint towers’ – keeper’s long, yaquina head, may 27, 1891. They aided victims of shipwrecks – ‘keeper send 2nd asst. to Newporte for assistance of a tug. The keepers gave the three men that got ashore necessary assistance done all in there power to make them comfortable’-Keeper’s long, Yaquina Head, March 28, 1889. Even though Newport was only four miles away, bad weather, poor roads, and the demands of their work combined to tie the keepers and their families to the Yaquina Head light station. They caught, shot, and grew their own food. ‘Keepers whitewashing the garden fence and weeding the garden also today.’ June 8 1887. They coped with the weather – when there were big storms and the seas were rough, it would make a roar and shae the lighthouse. the spray from the ocean, when the waves were rough, would spray clear up to the tower.Some of the women became keeps – Mrs M J Plummer went on duty as laborer today until a 2nd Asst. arrives at the station.’ August 17, 1888. In the long history of staffed US lighthouses, a number of women, usually wives or daughters of keepers served as keepers. “~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon. http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775

"Yaquina Head's light is 81'2" (25 m) above the ground and 162' (49 m) above mean sea level; the top of the tower is 10' (3 m) higher still. Higher is better - On America's rugged west coast, keeping lights low enough to be seen under the fog was often a problem. However if they were placed too low, they couldn't be seen far enough away to be useful.  The higher a light is, the further it can be seen at sea. At 162 feet (49 m) above sea level, Yaquina Head's light can be seen about 19 miles (32 km) out to sea. Late nights at the office - Imagine spending all of a long winter's night sitting on a stiff chair 70 feet (21 m) up in the tower watching the light. Now try to imagine doing it in the years before there was radio, tv, or even electricity! The buildings attached to the light tower has two rooms which once served as the 'oil room and office' however the keepers stood nightly watch in the tower itself. Still lighting the way: Many ships and boats continue to depend on lighthouses for navigational aid. Equipment in the small building attached to the light tower keeps a light on in case the electricity fails. A small battery-powered back up light is attached to the railing surrounding the lantern deck - you can see it from the observation deck at the base of the tower. By modern standards, the regular routine of a lighthouse keeper was monotonous. It was however sometimes interrupted by unexpected moments of drama. 'last night lightning struck the office and storeroom building. it tore off the copper, lead, and shingles where the root joins on to the tower ...' keeper's log, Yaquina head, Oct 18 1920.  By 10 am every day the lighthouse lamp was refueled and its five wicks trimmed. Throughout the day, the lens and windows were cleaned and repairs made to keep everything shipshape. At dusk the lamp was lit and then watched from the watchroom until sunrise. What else did keepers do? they greeted tourists ' ... sea quite smooth. keepers painting the watchroom and worki
“Yaquina Head’s light is 81’2” (25 m) above the ground and 162′ (49 m) above mean sea level; the top of the tower is 10′ (3 m) higher still. Higher is better – On America’s rugged west coast, keeping lights low enough to be seen under the fog was often a problem. However if they were placed too low, they couldn’t be seen far enough away to be useful. The higher a light is, the further it can be seen at sea. At 162 feet (49 m) above sea level, Yaquina Head’s light can be seen about 19 miles (32 km) out to sea. Late nights at the office – Imagine spending all of a long winter’s night sitting on a stiff chair 70 feet (21 m) up in the tower watching the light. Now try to imagine doing it in the years before there was radio, tv, or even electricity! The buildings attached to the light tower has two rooms which once served as the ‘oil room and office’ however the keepers stood nightly watch in the tower itself. Still lighting the way: Many ships and boats continue to depend on lighthouses for navigational aid. Equipment in the small building attached to the light tower keeps a light on in case the electricity fails. A small battery-powered back up light is attached to the railing surrounding the lantern deck – you can see it from the observation deck at the base of the tower. By modern standards, the regular routine of a lighthouse keeper was monotonous. It was however sometimes interrupted by unexpected moments of drama. ‘last night lightning struck the office and storeroom building. it tore off the copper, lead, and shingles where the root joins on to the tower …’ keeper’s log, Yaquina head, Oct 18 1920. By 10 am every day the lighthouse lamp was refueled and its five wicks trimmed. Throuhout the day, the lens and windows were cleaned and repairs made to keep everything shipshape. At dusk the lamp was lit and then watched from the watchroom until sunrise. What else did keepers do? they greeted tourists ‘ … sea quite smooth.

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Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon

"Yaquina Head's light is 81'2" (25 m) above the ground and 162' (49 m) above mean sea level;
“Yaquina Head’s light is 81’2” (25 m) above the ground and 162′ (49 m) above mean sea level; the top of the tower is 10′ (3 m) higher still.

Yaquina Head
Newport, Oregon

One of my favorite highlights of Newport, this great area of Natural Beauty is preserved by the Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System/Lands and a tourist hotspot on the Oregon Coast. Yaquina Head is a headland that extends into the Pacific Ocean with a pristine historic Light House at its head known as the Yaquina Head Light. The protected area is just north of Newport along U.S. Route 101. Consisting of 95 acres, it has been preserved since 1980. The head stands at 108 feet above sea level.

The area depicts a violent volcanic past with basalts that changed the coastline during volcanic eruptions millions of years ago. It is home to 5 hiking trails, all of which are less than a half mile in length paralleling the ocean or through the forest lines. It is a popular place for sightseeing, whale watching, bird watching, history, and the light house.

"Creating Cobbles; Cobbles, pebbles and sand are the result of boiling lava meeting the cold ocean, followed by 14 millin years of weather and erosion.  Fragments of ancient lava - hot basalt exploded upon contact with cold sea water and intermixed with quickly chilled volcanic glass to form a breccia. The cobbles on this beach are weathered remains of these exploded fragments. Sea water alters the glass surrounding the basalt fragments into a mineral called palagonite which is easily washed away. The water then attacks the fragment causing its corners to become more and more rounded. The cobbles are further rounded and made smaller by beach wave action. In the summer there is some sand on these beaches, but winter waves wash most of the sand out to sea leaving almost all cobbles on the beach. Between the tides: Tidal forces shape the shoreline and bring life to the intertidal area. Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the sun and moon. Here and elsewhere in the coastal Pacific Northwest there are almost always two high and two low tides daily. The pull of the moon and sun causes the oceans to bulge and the earth rotates under them. These bulges come and go as high tides. The tides would be easy to predict if they occurred exactly every six hours. However because the tides follow a cycle that is slightly more than six hours long, the whole sequence is repeated later each day. Mean (average) lowest low tide is used as the base level for most coastal charts and tide tables. When ships enter or leave harbor, the depth of water at mean low tide is more important to them than mean sea level." ~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon. Yaquina Head National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775). 1/27/16: Chronicles 23: Delving the Oregon Coast and Willamette Valley:  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=19727 -   Photos from  February 2016 . (c) 2016 - photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley  / Leaf McGowan
“Creating Cobbles; Cobbles, pebbles and sand are the result of boiling lava meeting the cold ocean, followed by 14 million years of weather and erosion. Fragments of ancient lava – hot basalt exploded upon contact with cold sea water and intermixed with quickly chilled volcanic glass to form a breccia. The cobbles on this beach are weathered remains of these exploded fragments. Sea water alters the glass surrounding the basalt fragments into a mineral called palagonite which is easily washed away. The water then attacks the fragment causing its corners to become more and more rounded. The cobbles are further rounded and made smaller by beach wave action. In the summer there is some sand on these beaches, but winter waves wash most of the sand out to sea leaving almost all cobbles on the beach. Between the tides: Tidal forces shape the shoreline and bring life to the intertidal area. Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the sun and moon. Here and elsewhere in the coastal Pacific Northwest there are almost always two high and two low tides daily. The pull of the moon and sun causes the oceans to bulge and the earth rotates under them. These bulges come and go as high tides. The tides would be easy to predict if they occurred exactly every six hours. However because the tides follow a cycle that is slightly more than six hours long, the whole sequence is repeated later each day. Mean (average) lowest low tide is used as the base level for most coastal charts and tide tables. When ships enter or leave harbor, the depth of water at mean low tide is more important to them than mean sea level.” ~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon. Yaquina Head National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775). 1/27/16: Chronicles 23: Delving the Oregon Coast and Willamette Valley: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=19727 – Photos from February 2016 . (c) 2016 – photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Leaf McGowan

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Newport, Oregon


Yaquina Head

Home of the Yaquina Bay Natural Beauty Area and a popular tourist Oregon beach location, Newport is roughly an area of 11 square miles of habitation, boasting a population just under 10,000 according to the 2010 census. The heart of Lincoln County Oregon – the name “Newport” was established with the post office in 1868 and incorporated in 1882 as a town. It became the county seat in 1952. For tourism, it is home to the Oregon Coast Aquarium, Hatfield Marine Science Center, Nye Beach, Pacific Maritime Heritage Center, and Rogue Ales.

    “Newport Harbor: founded in 1865, Newport has become the largest town on the central Oregon coast. Its railroad, maritime, and highway connections have nurtured its development. Today Newport harbor serves mostly commercial and recreational fishing boats. The harbor once exported agricultural products hauled by railroad from the Willamette Valley as well as lumber from sawmills on Yaquina Bay.” ~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon. http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775

Yaquina Head National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775). 1/27/16: Chronicles 23: Delving the Oregon Coast and Willamette Valley:  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=19727
Yaquina Head National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775). 1/27/16: Chronicles 23: Delving the Oregon Coast and Willamette Valley: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=19727

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Blodgett, Oregon

Blodgett, Oregon
~

Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

The small village of Blodgett, Oregon is home to roughly 56 inhabitants. We rented a large farm called Vegantopia while living there. The village only pretty much has a elementary school, a country store, and bare services as it is located next to nowhere. It is a census-designated place and unincorporated community of Benton County Oregon (though on the border of Lincoln county). It is centered where Oregon route 180 meets U.S. Route 20 in the Central Oregon Coast Range 15 miles west of Corvallis. It is close to the confluence of Marys River and the Tumtum river.

The village was named after William Blodgett, a pioneer who settled here in April 1888 with the name of “Emrick” after a local family, then the post office changed the name to Blodgett shortly after under zip code 97326. Under the Philomath School district, there is a small 38 student Blodgett Elementary School covering kindergarten through fourth grade. The region experiences warm and dry summers with an average monthly temperature of 71 degrees Fahrenheit.

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Vegantopia

Vegantopia
~ Blodgett, Oregon

Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

I really wish I had taken detailed notes on the history of Vegantopia. I just assumed when I was ready to write this article I could pick the brains of the founder and creator of Vegantopia later. But we all know how that goes. I believe he purchased the land and built the house in the 80’s or 90’s. There may have been remnant creations or foundations earlier as he did tell tales of certain musicians contributing wood to the stage down below. The house itself was a one-two bedroom downstairs (if you count the terrarium he has a bedroom setup in) with its own bathroom and kitchen. Then the two door garage in an industrial sized warehouse converted barn that could host two large diesel trucks, but currently empty with a fashion walkway and a performance stage, and a food trailer which housed the kitchen of the ranch’s name “Vegantopia”.

Upstairs is a three bedroom house with kitchen, living room, dining room area, three rooms (we used one for our son’s room, the other an office, and the final a master bedroom), a bathroom with a claw-foot iron tub. Fireplace, deck, and two stairwells – one to the deck, the other from the garage. The side of the house hosted an awned storage bay with stacks of firewood for the winter. An organic garden, a gypsy wagon/vardo for a guesthouse with its own sink, bed/loft, table, chairs, and stove. Solar panels to power up the house and a disintegrating hut that was once a workshop. A creek running through the property with a foot bridge over it, an apple orchard, hiking trails, and a faerie ritual circle up in the woods. It was a magical place. I don’t remember if it was 8 or 16 acres of land.

Vegantopia was the name given to the place by its founder Markey Stuart. Markey created a tempeh kitchen where here he concocted his magical creations of a variety of tempeh that was sold to grocery stories ranging from Ashland, Oregon to Portland with most of the sales in Corvallis and Eugene.

There is little on the web about him or Vegantopia. You can find mention of his infamous Tempeh and soymilk he produced in issues of FA times, vol 32, issues 1 and 4.

They referred to Mark Stuart as a long tie Co-op owner and mastermind behind Vegantopia. He sold his local 6 soymilk made from organic soybeans that they described as impeccably pristine clean food as a basic wholesome soymilk packaged in reusable glass canning jars. We had the pleasure of being gifted it there while we co-habitated the land. We rented the top house and the vardo while Markey lived in the smaller unit down below.

The Vegantopia Tempeh was the most famous creation of the kitchen – fresh, tender, nutritious cakes made of soybeans, garbanzo beans, or quinoa fermented with extra high mycelia content from organic ingredients and packaged in cellophane instead of plastic. Eaten raw or cooked its a favorite of all local vegetarians and vegans.

As Mark Stuart was selling off his empire, we had plans to purchase the land and home from him, including the tempeh trailer but we were unable to come up with the funds by the time he was ready to move on (which was rather quickly) so it was sold to another amazing family that was a perfect fit for the land and home.

An amazing secret magical paradise. Vegantopia has woven its own web.

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Lammas Celebration and tree planting ceremony over Cian’s umbilical cord, Oregon, USA. Planting of lavender, and underneath a baby persimmons tree. Thursday, August 1, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/. This blog, see http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=41999.

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Disney California Adventure

Disney’s California Adventure
https://disneyland.disney.go.com/destinations/disney-california-adventure/

The Americanized cartoon-famed Adventure Park by Disney is one of my more recent Theme Park tromping grounds I’ve had the pleasure to go to thanks to my brother being Technical Director at Disney and him being able to guest in family and friends. This is a favorite of my son Prince Cian as well. One of my more favorite sections is “It’s a Bug’s Life” where one can imagine themselves shrunken to insect-size walking around the blades of grass based around Disney Pixar’s Film of the same name. The Ant island is pretty cool as well in the Bug’s Life Theater. The Jumpin Jellyfish lets you sour into the sky above Paradise Bay on a jellyfish on a parachute-style ride. The the all time favorite Little Mermaid ~ Ariel’s Undersea Adventure has a music filled adventure in her underwater world. Exploring the land of “Cars” was my son’s favorite where he could race in a race-car through canyonlands and meet Lightning McQueen and Tater the tow truck. Good fun different than Disney across the lot.

Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5

Family time at Disney’s California Adventure ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=30907), Los Angeles, California. “A California Adventure” – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken April 8, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Family time at Disney’s California Adventure ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=30907), Los Angeles, California. “A California Adventure” – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken April 8, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Fairmount Park – Riverside, California

Fairmount Park
~ 2601 Fairmount Boulevard, Riverside, California * https://riversideca.gov/park_rec/facilities-parks ~

This stunning park was just right around the corner from our duplex in the heart of Riverside, California. Therefore it was a favorite place of ours to walk to and let our little Prince play at the playground and around the lakes. Fairmount Park was also listed as on the the American Planning Association’s top rated places in America. It is located south of the Santa Ana River and Route 60. Known as a “Frontline Park” since 2011, it was designed by Olmsted and Olsted in 1911 involving the creation of Lake Evans in 1924. After incidents of severe crimes took place in the area, damages by floods and deterioration of Lake Evans the Park was rehabilitated and revitalized in 2001, including the addition of a playground costing over 2.5 million dollars to build. The park has 2 tennis courts, a golf course, public barbecues, boat rentals, sailing, fishing, running, jogging, and walking trails along the Santa Ana River Trail. Summer concert series take place each year.

Rated: 3.8 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Fairmount Park – Riverside, California. Investigating the Inland Empire – Life in Riverside, California: Chronicle 10 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Photos taken August 02, 2015. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=15559. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. All rights reserved.

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Shaniko Ghost Town, Oregon

Shaniko, Oregon

The now “ghost town” of “Shaniko Oregon” was once a bustling gold mining town in the Oregon Desert. It is located in Wasco County Oregon along U.S. Route 97 just north of Antelope. In 2010, there was 36 registered residents. It sits at 3,343 feet above sea level atop a high plateau in a sparse vegetative environment of sage, bunch grass, and junipers. After gold was discovered in Canyon City, Euro-Americans came to the area in 1862 during the Gold Rush. Camps were setup wherever water was found. The first camp close to where Shaniko now resides was Bakeoven and then camp Cross Hollow which eventually evolved into Shaniko. 1867 saw feuds with local Indians and robberies of gold transports. The United states awarded a grant to build a military wagon road from the Dalles to Fort Boise, Idaho. Along the route homesteaders began claiming all the available land. One of the settlers was August Scherneckau who settled here after the Civil War in 1874 that Shaniko was named after as is common after postmasters which August was in 1879. The post office of Cross Hollows closed in 1887 and Shaniko post office opened in 1900. The Columbia Southern Railway was built in 1900 and terminus was in Shaniko from Biggs Junction. This was when it was known as the “Wool Capital of the World” focusing on wheat, wool, cattle, and sheep production. 1911 the Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company utilized an alternative route from Portland to Bend diverting traffic from the Columbia Southern forcing Shaniko’s industry and population to decline. The Passenger service to Shaniko ended in the 1930’s and shut down by 1966. The town became a ghost town in 1982.

Rated: 3.5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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John Day

John Day

One of the famous pioneers of Oregon is a man named John Day. He was a trapper who came to Oregon with a large group and fell into a smaller group heading West while travelling along the Columbia River. He was born in Culpepper County Virginia. He travelled West through Kentucky to the Spanish Upper Louisiana which is now Missouri by the year 1797. By 1810 he joined the Pacific Fur Company as a trapper becoming part of their overland expedition West under lead of Wilson Price Hunt. They travelled from Missouri to Fort Astoria along the mouth of the Columbia River in 1811-1812. While in company of Ramsay Crooks, they were robbed and stripped naked by Indians along the Columbia River at the Mouth of the confluence. The infamous robbery gave the area to be named after him. In 1812 he was assigned to accompany Robert Stuart back East to St. Louis but was left on the Lower Columbia River where he went mad. He returned to Fort Astoria and spent the remaining 8 years hunting and trapping in the Willamette Valley. He died in 1820 at the winter camp of Donald MacKenzie’s Snake Country Expedition into the Little Lost River valley of today’s Butte County, Idaho. The John Day River is named after him and his history follows the four branches of the river in eastern Oregon. The cities of Dayville and John Day are also named after him, as well as the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument.

John Day Fossil Beds site – clarno unit info board: “Who was John Day? John Day came to oregon in 1812 as part of an overland expedition to the new pacific fur company post in astoria. The once large party split up and into many small groups before reaching the Oregon territory. While camped where the mouth of the mah-hah river meets the Columbia, John Day and Ramsay Crooks were robbed of all their belongings, including clothing. Luckily they were rescued by a party of trapper also headed to Astoria. John Day became well known at the trading post. Whenever others would pass the spot of the incident, they would point out where he had been robbed. Thus the mah-hah river became known as the John Day river. John Day never came here. It was Thomas Condon who named this area the John Day fossil Beds because of the river’s role as a landmark and its importance in eroding and exposing fossil bearing rock layers. “The Pallisades (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27413) – Clarno Unit – John Day Fossil National Monument (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27401). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Oregon. Photos taken August 2, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

~ Article by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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John Day Fossil Beds National Monument (Clarno Unit – Oregon)

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument – The Clarno Unit
~ 32651 Highway 19, Kimberly, Oregon * Phone: (541) 987-2333 ~

The Clarno Unit is one of three sections of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument that was designated by the United States as an area of special concern in Wheeler and Grant counties of Eastern Oregon. It is located within the John Day River basin and operated by the National Parks Service. The focus of the protected area is its geology and paleontology specializing in well-preserved layers of fossilized materials including flora and fauna. Most found here date from the late Eocene around 45 million years ago to the late Miocene at 5 million years before present. The Other two units are Sheep Rock and Painted Hills. The total designated area is 13,944 acres of semi-desert shrub land, riparian zones, and badlands. It was originally visited by Native Americans such as the Sahaptin who hunted, fished, and gathered roots/berries in the region. Then came the Euro-American visitors who established ranches, farms, and small towns along the river. Under guidance of Thomas Condon in 1864, geologists and paleontologists began digging in the area and making the discoveries that the area is famous for today.

Clarno is the westermost of the three units and is approximately 1,969 acres roughly 18 miles west of Fossil along Oregon Route 218. A breathtaking rest stop along the scenic Journey through Time scenic byway in Oregon is the geological features known as the Pallisades. It is located roughly 18 miles west of Fossil, Oregon. These cliffs and land forms are created by prehistoric volcanic lahars (or volcanic mud flows) roughly 54-40 million years ago. This landscape was quite different at that time – a lush semi-tropical rainforest with jungles, vines, trees, shrubs and mega fauna. After the volcanic cataclysms, the environment was turned into the arid desert it is now. Fossil evidence depicts a vast arrange of plant life from leavaes, fruits, nuts, seeds, and petrified wood of over 173 species of trees, vines, shrubs, and other plants. Numerous faunal fossil remains of crocodiles, mini four-toed horses, huge rhino-like brontotheres, and meat-eating creodonts were found. There are three distinct hiking trails all under a mile in length demonstrating the fossil and geological record. Picnic tables and restrooms make for a restful stay. Drinking water is available from the rest stop May through September.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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john day fossil site – clarno unit info board: “Few places in North America offer such a unique look into the distant past than the clarno unit of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. From the glimpses of the tropical forest captured in the rocks of the palisade cliffs to the spectacular nuts, fruits, leaves and twigs preserved in the one of a kind clarno nut beds, to the rhinos, brontotherese and hroses unearthed in the hancock mammal quarry pictured here. The fossil of clarno provide an extremely rare and surprisingly complex record of life in ancient oregon 40-54 million years ago. … massive brontotheres – left, primitive four toed horses such as epihippus center and hapiohippus right and a powerful bear-like predator hemipsaladon – upper right are just a few of the fascinating animals unearthed in the hancock mammal quarry. The quarry located only a mile from werhe you stnd may have been a watering hole where animals congregated in large numbers as in this artist’s depiction. Many fossil specimes unearthed here are on display in the Thomas Condon Paleontological Center near Dayville Oregon. “The Pallisades (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27413) – Clarno Unit – John Day Fossil National Monument (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27401). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Oregon. Photos taken August 2, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Journey through Time Scenic Byway (Oregon)

Journey Through Time Scenic Byway – Oregon
~ Oregon ~

This scenic route goes through parts of the state of Oregon spanning five counties and passing through Dayville, Mount Vernon, John Day, and Prairie City. It consists of Oregon Routes 7, 19, 26, 218 and U.S. Route 97 following much of the John Day River. Its purpose is to take tourists and drivers along the pioneer history of Oregon focusing on geology and paleontological history. It is 286 miles in length. You can start from Biggs along U.S. 97 through Shaniko to Antelope, then east on Oregon 218 to Fossil. Rest stop in John Day Fossil Beds National Monument then take it along Oregon 19 towards Kimberly, then east on U.S. 26 to Dayville, then through Mount Vernon, John Day, and Prairie City onwards east along Oregon 7 to Baker City. This route was established February 19, 1997 as a Oregon Scenic Byway.

Rated: 3 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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The Pallisades, John Day Fossil Beds, Oregon

The Pallisades – John Day Fossil Beds
~ Fossil, Oregon * Contact: 32651 Highway 19, Kimberly, OR 97848 * Phone: (541) 987-2333 ~

A breathtaking rest stop along the scenic Journey through Time scenic byway in Oregon is the geological features known as the Pallisades. It is located roughly 18 miles west of Fossil, Oregon. These cliffs and land forms are created by prehistoric volcanic lahars (or volcanic mud flows) roughly 54-40 million years ago. This landscape was quite different at that time – a lush semi-tropical rainforest with jungles, vines, trees, shrubs and mega fauna. After the volcanic cataclysms, the environment was turned into the arid desert it is now. Fossil evidence depicts a vast arrange of plant life from leavaes, fruits, nuts, seeds, and petrified wood of over 173 species of trees, vines, shrubs, and other plants. Numerous faunal fossil remains of crocodiles, mini four-toed horses, huge rhino-like brontotheres, and meat-eating creodonts were found. There are three distinct hiking trails all under a mile in length demonstrating the fossil and geological record. Picnic tables and restrooms make for a restful stay. Drinking water is available from the rest stop May through September.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Red Gravy (Colorado Springs)

Red Gravy
~ 23 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 * http://redgravyco.com/ ~

I have yet to visit this wonderful artsy and comfortable restaurant for a dine-in, though have been through the doors many times for deliveries. Every customer i’ve delivered to are dedicated patrons, always enthusiastic about receiving the delivery. Obviously that tops the list for a visit some day when the finances are flowing as it is a littler higher end than my usual options of my own wallet’s accord. The staff is extremely friendly, prompt, and attentive. Dining ambiance appears relaxed and appetizing. Deemed an Italian kitchen, the menu selection for brunch, lunch, and dinner looks addictive – there is not an item on the menu i wouldn’t be interested in. I tried to find some history about the restaurant but the web site lacks an about us page.

Rated: unrated of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been rated. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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“The Dance” statue – Tejon street, Colorado Springs, Colorado

The Dance
~ Colorado Springs, Colorado ~

Downtown Colorado Springs is adorned with this spinning bronze sculpture of a dancing couple mounted on a wheel axis slowly turning around and around. It’s a charming piece for the downtown area. It is inscribed as “The Heart Has Reasons That Reason Does Not Know” and was created by artist James N Muir. It also proclaims “MARRIAGE IS A JOURNEY OF LOVE WHERE TWO SET OUT AND ARRIVE AS ONE”.

more information here.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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The Dance, By James Nathan Muir. Located on the Southwest corner of Colorado avenue and Tejon Street. Tales of a Delivery Driver: Chronicle 278- Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken August 2, 2018. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=39039. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2018. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051

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The Lighted Lantern Statue, Tejon street, Colorado Springs

The Lighted Lantern
~ off 100th block of south Tejon street, Colorado Springs, Colorado ~

A beautifully sculptured statue along downtown Colorado Springs main drag – this sculpture was created by artist James N. Muir.
The artist describes that statue as a pioneer couple finding the courage within, balanced by the strength of their union holding aloft the lantern light of hope for a brave new world of freedom for all … the broken wagon wheel representing the end of one journey and the beginning of another carrying a Model 1876 Winchester the man standing on the book of truth … More can be found out
about the artist and statue here; http://www.jamesmuir.com/the-lighted-lantern-lifesize-bronze-sculpture.htm

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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The Lighted Lantern by artist James N. Muir, at the 100 block of South Tejon Street, just below Colorado Avenue.Tales of a Delivery Driver: Chronicle 278- Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken August 2, 2018. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=39039. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2018. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051

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East Coast Deli and Restaurant (Colorado Springs)

East Coast Deli and Restaurant
~ 24 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~ http://eastcoastdeli.net/

Right in the heart of downtown Colorado Springs is this nice quaint eatery that gives the feel of a NYC delicatessan offering soups, salads, deli sandwiches, burgers, lunch, and breakfast. They pride themselves as a New York Style Delicatessen & Restaurant. The owners Chris and Laura are from Long Island, N.Y. and have owned restaurants in New York, Las Vegas, and now Colorado Springs. Products and ingredients are shipped directly from New York and bake their breads in shop daily. Their soups are made from scratch and they roast their own meats and are open 7 days a week for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Rated: UNRATED of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Spiced Island Grill (Colorado Springs)

Spiced Island Grill
~ 10 N Sierra Madre St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~

A delicious treat of Jamaican food and spiced island gourmet that has a top rating in Colorado Springs. A little off-map location down by the park and railroad in downtown Colorado Springs. The restaurant began 20 years ago by owners Claudette and Glenroy Hutchinson vending at fairs, street markets, and festivals throughout the country from New England to Cambridge England, they travelled all over. The restaurant has a hide-a-way feel, nestled out of the city bustle yet in a downtown setting. It is believed by the owners that the building they occupy used to be a brothel that served gold miners and railroad workers in days past. The history is not documented, some shoes of brothel style were found in the crawlspace, and the building is called “El Tesoro” meaning “the treasure” of Sierra Madre Street. The building was converted into an adobe style restaurant in 1991.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Blank Canvas Cafe (Colorado Springs)

Blank Canvas Cafe
~ 103 S Wahsatch Ave #106, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~

A great little hole-in-the-wall restaurant and cafe off of Wahsatch avenue in downtown Colorado Springs. It appears to be a popular hangout and has great reviews. I unfortunately have not yet tried it out. They offer a unique assortment of teas, pastries, salads, paninis, sandwiches, and locally roasted coffee. They offer an artistic space for local artists and hand-made creations from the Studio as well as poetry readings, open mic night, comedy, music, and entertainment. The cafe is the vision of Dream Catchers and funded by Ariel Clinical Services.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Dunes City, Oregon

Dunes City, Oregon and its surroundings

Dunes City is a small town along the Oregon Coast near Florence, Oregon and Eugene, Oregon that is surrounded by large numerous and expansive sand dunes. The City itself is small, population in 2010 was a mere 1300 residents. The town in still influenced by the lumber industry surrounding the Dunes, otherwise tourism and recreation with ATV’s and dune machines infiltrate the area.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Riverside, California

Riverside, California

In the heart of the Inland Empire is a city called “Riverside” as it is located alongside the Santa Ana River. It is the most populated city in the Inland Empire and Riverside County, becoming the county seat for the same named county it resides in. It is located 55 miles east of downtown Los Angeles and considered part of the Greater Los Angeles area being the 59th most populated city in the United States and the 12th most populated in California. The 2010 Census stated it having a population of 303,871 residents.

Riverside was founded around 1870 hosting the California citrus industry, expansion, and tourism. The area was originally inhabited by the Cahuilla and Serrano Native American peoples. In the late 1700’s white Westerners began moving in and early 1800’s saw large ranches being built by Bernardo Yorba and Juan Bandini. By the 1860’s Louis Prevost launched the California Silk Center Association – a short lived experiment in sericulture. After it failed, John W. North purchased some of the experimental lands and formed the Southern California Colony Association to promote the area’s development. By March of 1870 North distributed posters announcing the formation of a colony in California. Years later some naval orange trees were planted here and found great success that full scale planting began and the area was overrun with orchards.

Riverside is home to the Mission Inn – the largest Mission Revival style building in the United States as well as the Riverside National Cemetery. It is also home to the University of California Riverside branch. There is a notable Fox Performing Arts Center, Riverside Metropolitan Museum, California Museum of Photography, California Citrus State Historic Park, the Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree, and a Drive-In theater.

Art

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Mission Inn (Riverside, CA)

Historic Mission Inn
~ Riverside, California ~

Along Highway 395 and the Riverside Downtown/Street Mall is the Mission Inn Hotel and Spa one of Riverside’s most notable Historic Landmarks. It boasts numerous architectural styles but is considered the largest Mission Revival Style Building in the United States. It is currently owned by Duane and Kelly Roberts. Originally it began as a Adobe style boarding house called the “Glenwood Cottage” built by engineer Christopher Columbus Miller on November 22, 1876. The Hotel was purchased by their son in February 1880 and created a full-service hotel by the early 1900’s taking advantage of the Citrus boom, warm weather, and wealthy travelers coming to the area from the East Coast and Europe. In 1902 it was re-named “Glenwood Mission Inn” and that was when various architectural styles were incorporated into its style based on Miller’s vision for eclectic structure drawn from various revivals, influences, and styles including Spanish Gothic, Mission Revival Style, Moorish Revival, Spanish Colonial Style, Spanish Colonial Revival, Renaissance Revival, and Mediterranean Revival Style. The hotel is complicated and intricately built with narrow passageways, exterior arcades, a medieval style clock, a five story rotunda, patios, windows, castle towers, minareets, a Cloister Wing with catacombs, flying buttresses, Mediterranean domes, and a pedestrian sky bridge. Miller was also a world explorer and over thirty years of ownership brought back treasures from around the world to add into the hotel.

The St. Francis Chapel has four large stained glass windows and two original mosaics created by Louis Comfort Tiffany in 1906 that were salvaged from the Madison Square Presbyterian Church. The “Rayas Altar” is in Mexican Baroque style sitting 25 feet tall x 16 feet width made of cedar and covered in gold leaf. There is a Garden of Bells with over 800 bells from all over the world including one dating to 1247. In 1932 he opened the St. Francis Atrio hosting the “Famous Fliers Walls” commemorating notable aviators including Amelia Earheart. Today it has 151 fliers honored on the wall.

After Frank died in 1935 the Inn was run by his daughter and her husband Allis and Dewitt Hutchings. They died in 1956 and from thence forward saw various ownership changes including some of the rooms converted to apartments and used for dorms at UC Riverside. It was almost purchased from St. John’s College for a western campus but lost the bid when John Gaw Meem donated them land in Santa Fe. It was then acquired by the Carley Capital Group and saw massive renovations in 1985. In December 1992 it was sold to Duane Roberts who completed the renovations and reopened it to the public. Today it offers a hotel, spa, outdoor pool, museum, and fine dining. They now host annually a Festival of lights, Pumpkin stroll, and Ghost walks.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Barbara and Art Culver Center for the Arts (Riverside, California)


~ Riverside, California ~

Barbara and Art Culver Center of the Arts is located in the Riverside Downtown/Street Mall and is an extension of art displays from the University of California at Riverside. The Center hosts art installations, weekly film programs, musicals, dances, and theatrical performances in dynamic settings recognizing that artists play a crucial role in our society. They continued preservation of the arts with a series of lectures, symposiums, and community forums. The main level hosts an expansive atrium gallery beneath a 40′ high skylight, home to the Sweeney Art Gallery, hosts a 72 seated screening room, and a cafe. On Level 2 there is a Media Lab, dance studios, black box with green screen, and a sound recording studio. The lower level houses the California Museum of Photography’s Important Keystone Mast Collection of stereo-graphs preserved in state of the art seismically isolated cabinets.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. This location has not been visited. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Cesar Chavez Memorial Statue (Riverside, California)


~ Riverside, CaliforniaCalifornia ~

In the heart of the Riverside Downtown/Street Mall is a statue/monument dedicated the the Human Rights advocate Cesar Chavez who was one of California’s notable farm workers, labor leaders, and civil rights activists. It is located near University Avenue next to statues of Martin Luther King Junior, Mohandas Gandhi, Ahn Chang-Ho, Ysmael Villegas, and citrus pioneer and activist Eliza Tibbets.

Cesar Estrada Chavez, born March 31, 1926 in Yuma, Arizona with five other siblings became a migrant farm working family in 1937 after his family lost their farm in the Great Depression. He left school during the 8th grade to work full time in the fields spending his youth and adulthood travelling along the southwest working in vineyards and farms learning first hand the trials and injustices of migrant farm worker’s life. He attended over three dozen elementary and middle schools through his life. Even though he had to give up his education to work, he continued reading and studying philosophy through economics believing that “the end of all education should surely be service to others”. They settled in San Jose California in 1939 living in a barrio called Sal Si Puedes. He joined the U.S. Navy when he turned 17 in 1944 for 2 years during the reverberation of World War II. Upon his return from service he married Helen Fabela while working the vineyards. He became a community advocate in 1952 and organized the Community Service Organization civil rights group organizing voter registration drives, speeches to support worker’s rights, and campaigns against racial and economic discrimination and became the national director in the early 1960’s. He resigned in 1962 to establish the National Farm Workers Association with Dolores Huerta creating the United Farm Workers (UFW). He spent the next three decades leading the first successful farm worker’s union in American history. This led him to become a true American Hero who eventually died in his sleep on April 23, 1993 near Yuma, Arizona close to his early family farm.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Riverside California downtown street mall

Pedestrian Street Mall of Riverside
~ Riverside, California ~

In downtown Riverside, California is a “Riverside Renaissance Project” that is currently going under a $10 million dollar renovation. It includes a Pedestrian Street Mall stretching along Main Street from 5th to 10th street. It was officially opened in 1966 and closed to motor vehicles invigorated by statues, art, and fountains. It is flanked by the City Hall and the Convention Center. It contains the historic Mission Inn and the Cesar Chavez Monument, as well as the Barbara and Art Culver Center for the Arts.

Rated: 3 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Cesar Chavez Memorial Statue

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US California Highway 395

California US Highway 395

US California Highway 395
~ California – NEVADA – OREGON ~

Highway 395 runs from California, through Nevada, to Oregon over 556 miles in length. It was founded in the 1930’s. It runs from Interstate 15 from Hesperia, California to the Oregon State line in Modoc County near Goose Lake. It cuts into Nevada servicing Carson City and Reno. It services San Diego, San Bernardino, Riverside, Owens Valley, Mammoth Lakes, and Mono Lake in California and gives access to Mount Whitney and Death Valley. The route has been used since the California Gold Rush and before obtaining this route number had many different names including the El Camino Sierra. California has designated it as a scenic highway from Fort Independence to Fort Springs Road in Inyo County and from Inyo-Mono County line to Walker as parts of the highway pass through “memorable landscapes” with no visual intrusions. From Lone Pine north to the Nevada state line occurs a high concentration of natural hot springs called the “hot springs jackpot”. Around Lone Pine the highway passes by the Manzanar National Historic district where Japanese Americans were imprisoned in a concentration camp during World War II. The highway passes Mono Lake and the Sierra crest as well as Conway Summit. The highway also passes by the ghost town known as Bodie that still has items on shelves in abandoned stores. The highway goes over the summit of Devil’s Gate Pass at 7,519 feet above sea level separating the East and West Walker Rivers and passes by Topaz Lake near the California-Nevada State line.

The highway leaves California around Topaz Lake for 87 miles in Nevada connecting Reno and Carson City, goes over the Simee Dimeh Summit, exits the mountains to the receding escarpment of the Sierra Nevadas entering California as a freeway dwindling to a divided highway just past the state line following Long Valley Creek to Honey Lake heading north following a rail line built by the Nevada-California-Oregon Railway. It goes through Lassen County for 3 miles. The highway goes around the west side of the 73 square mile Honey Lake towards Susanville which it does not enter looping around the Susanville Municipal Airport. It then bends around Shaffer Mountain, crosses the Modoc Plateau, serving the towns of Ravendale, Termo, and Madeline in Lassen County parallels the South Fork of the Pit River to the confluence with the North Fork in Alturas. It then follows North Fork Pit River across Modoc County to Goose Lake and junctions with SR 299 in Alturas then for the last 50 miles parallels the east shore of Goose Lake crossing into Oregon at New Pine Creek, Oregon.

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Fossil Motel and RV Park (Fossil, Oregon)

Fossil Motel and RV Park
~ 105 First Street, Fossil, Oregon 97830 * (541) 763-4075 * http://www.fossilmotelandrvpark.com/ ~

We visited end of summer 2016 and found it ok. It bills itself as a “Classic 1950’s Motor Court-Style Motel
Just off the historic Oregon Scenic Byway, Journey Through Time in Fossil, Oregon”. It is conveniently located for a short walk into Fossil and walking distance from the Fossil beds. The rooms are average, basic, and worn. The “RV Park” is an open field and extension cords have to be run around the place to get power to your “site”. It is a bit run-down. There is a single shower/bathroom for the campers that is located in the back of a laundry room with tight spaces, cold water (couldn’t get hot when i used it) and not very clean. The showers and bathrooms in the rooms are much better. Fossil doesn’t have many options so its really not much to complain about in that regard. It’s quiet and basic. There is a large meadow bordering the RV field with horses and a playground/courts on the other side. Managerial staff is nice but fussy. There are 7 rooms and about 10 camping spots/RV. WiFi signal was ok but lost connection a lot.

Rated: 2 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Horses in the fields at Fossil Motel and RV Park

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