Category Archives: liquor

Spirits and Entities, spirituality of Alcohol

Spirits and Entities of Alcohol
by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions

It always amazes me how the world really doesn’t understand the “root” of all things, nor pay attention to the “history” of various items or substances that they use occasionally or daily in life. I strongly believe it is very important to know the “root” and “makeup” of anything one puts in their bodies. Regardless of whether one is religious, spiritual, or scientific – the role of religion and spirituality in all aspects of life has some intriguing elements that should not be ignored. The proverb “You are what you eat”; has a lot of elements of truth in that saying because what you put in your body affects it chemically, physically, mentally, emotionally, and yes, spiritually. I won’t debate between science and religion in this article and for those readers that are atheist and don’t believe in spirituality – while reading this – simply ignore the spiritual overtones of this article and focus on the chemical aspect of what is being put in your body and understanding the elements you allow into your temple. For those readers that are avid drinkers – think about the drink you are putting in your body and go for higher quality substances as one really should consider changing to “organic” and “triple distilled” spirits instead, and for the spiritual user – know the entity or “spirit” you are inviting into your being.

This is not a negative article on drugs, substances, or alcohol, but rather a spiritual understanding of why we use them, the benefits and the dangers associated with them. Alcohol use needs to be practiced responsibly, for abusing it can lead to serious consequences. There really is more to “being under the influence” than you can rationally understand. Historically and spiritually, in all world cultures and religions, in folklore and mythology, every substance, every herb, every mineral, and every plant has a “spirit” or “entity” or “deity” assigned or associated with it. Drugs – Alcohol, barbiturates, hallucinogens, chemicals, or what-not are made of compositions of plants, herbs, minerals, and living matter. Drugs are medicines as well as poisons, with positive and negative effects on a living host that ingest them. Side effects from these drugs create various moods, effects on the body, mind, spirit, and persona. Many of these effects are utilized for spiritual visions, trances, omens, oracles, prophecies, messages, or communication with the beyond in the realms of religion. When abused, they often consume the body and the soul and will create a degradation of a being. Regardless of the substance : alcohol, marijuana, psilocybin, LSD, mDMA, barbiturates, etc. – Each substance has its own entity or spirit that culture attributes certain persona and effects to. It is pretty important to understand what entities you are dealing with, and how to gain advantage from a temporary relationship with them, and how to avoid them taking advantage of you.

For this article, I’m focusing on “spirits” or “alcohol”, as it is the most common grouping of entities that the mass population deals with. Why is “Alcohol” given the name “spirits” in the annals of history? The words “alembic” and “alcohol” are metaphors for “aqua vitae” (Life Water) and “Spirit”, often refer to a distilled liquid that came from magical explorations in Middle Eastern alchemy. “Alcohol” comes from the Arabic “al-kuhl” or “al-ku??l”, which means “Body Eating Spirit”, and gives the root origin to the English term for “ghoul”. In Middle Eastern Folklore, a “ghoul” is a “evil demon thought to eat human bodies”, either as stolen corpses or as children.

Since the root of the name “alcohol” is related to the concept of “body eating spirit”, this is also one of the early roots to traditional taboos on imbibing alcohol in the beginnings of Islam and similar prohibition faiths. In Islam, consumption of any alcohol is punishable with 80 lashes. To many “Pagan” or “Heathen” faiths, the imbibing of spirits and the temporary relationship with these entities gives definition to the “aqua vita” beliefs or “life water” or “connection / communication with spirits” that can be quite beneficial. In fact, faiths that had its roots in Paganism, such as Christianity and Islam, have carried over beneficial beliefs about the consumption or imbibation of alcohol.


As Middle Eastern alchemists ingested alcohol they reported that their senses deadened and this is why they saw the elixirs produced as possessing “body taking” qualities. This is where the Europeans are believed to have derived the use of “spirits” for “alcohol”. What is ingested affects a living body spiritually, mentally, emotionally, and physically. Some believe it will affect the soul as well and that it is all about relationships. Some faiths and cultures have credible valid positive reasons to abstain from drugs and alcohol, while others have equal reasons to promote them. Many cultures see drugs and alcohol as negative, but if one looks into the history of these elementals, there exists many positive elements in their usage, especially when balanced with spirituality and religion. Many cultures and faiths traditionally ingest something in order to commune with the Divine, God/desses, and/or spirits. Whether the wine and bread of Catholic Mass, or the trance induction of peyote with South American Shamans, the use of these substances have a honored tradition throughout history. Shamanic use of trance-inducing drugs are not considered destructive, but rather gifts of the Gods that allow the body and spirit to commune with higher planes of existence. Peyote, ayahuasca, salvia divinorum, absinthe, psilocybin, and other substances are assigned to induce spirit communication, clairvoyance, and the ability to heal. Most forms of Christianity consume alcohol as part of everyday life and nearly always use “wine” (fermented grape juice) in their central rite with the Eucharist or “Lord’s Supper”. The beliefs surrounding this practice state that Christian Tradition and/or the Bible teaches that “alcohol” is a “gift from God that makes life more joyous, but that overindulgence leading to drunkenness is a sin”. The key of Christianity is “moderation”. 19th century Protestants attempted to move from this earlier position of thought and pursuing “abstention” or “prohibition” of alcohol believing its use to be a “sin” even to the extreme of a sip (i.e. Mormonism). The Bible repeatedly refers to alcohol in use and poetic expression, and while mainly ambivalent to it, still states them to be both a “blessing from God that brings merriment” and a “potential danger that can be unwisely and sinfully abused”. “Wine” is often portrayed in daily life as a symbol of abundance and physical blessing, and negatively as a “mocker” with beer being a “brawler”, and drinking a cup of strong wine to the dregs and getting drunk can be presented as a symbol of God’s judgement and wrath. As puritans often spoke in their sermons that “Drink is in itself a good creature of God, and to be received with thankfulness, but the abuse of drink is from Satan; the wine is from God, but the drunkard is from the Devil”. Bible warns that alcohol can hinder moral discretion, and that alcohol can be corrupting of the body and a substance that will impair judgement and distract one from God’s will of life.

While the Ancient Egyptians promoted beer and wine, they did warn of taverns and excessive drinking. However the Greek Dionysus cult promoted intoxication as a means to get closer to their Deity. Macedonians viewed intemperance as a sign for masculinity and were well known for their drunkenness. Alexander the Great was a proponent to the Cult of Dionysus and known for his inebriation. Ancient and Modern Roman celebrations on March 15th of Anna Parenna celebrates the Goddess of the Returning Year by crossing the Tiber River and “go abroad” into Etruria and picnic in flimsy huts made of branches, drink as much alcohol as they could, as it was thought that one would live for as many years as cups of alcohol one could drink on this date. Once finished they would return to their homes in Rome. Most Pagan religions encourage alcohol use and some pursue intoxication promoted as a means of fostering fertility. To Pagan faiths it is believed to increase sexual desire and to make it easier to approach another person for sex. Norse paganism considered alcohol to be the sap of Yggdrasil and drunkenness as an important fertility rite in this religion. Alcohol was also used for medicinal purposes in biblical times as an oral anesthetic, topical cleanser, soother, and digestive aid. Problems associated with industrialization and rapid urbanization were also attributed and blamed on alcohol including urban crime, poverty, high infant mortalities, though its likely that gross overcrowding and unemployment was the actual root cause. The modern world then started blaming personal, social, religious, and moral problems on alcohol. This led to modern movements of prohibitionism. A typical Buddhist view on Alcohol use is as a shortcut for the pursuit of happiness as it produces a short term euphoria or happiness and this is the reason millions of people drink it repeatedly every day. Buddha teaches alcohol as well as all drugs, lead to mis judgement, blocks rational thinking, and therefore preached against amongst its disciples even though in some Buddhist disciplines it is used as offerings to Deity and spirits. Islam, Jainism, the Bahai’ Faith, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Church of Christ, Scientist, the United Pentecostal Church International, Theravada, most Mahayana schools of Buddhism, some Protestant denominations of Christianity, and some sects of Hinduism – forbid, discourage, or restrict the drinking of alcoholic beverages for various reasons.

Science tells us alcohol releases dopamine into the brain, stimulating the pleasure sensation. There are a lot of “expectations” with alcohol, and many of these will still operate in the absence of actual consumption of alcohol, when the individual believes they are consuming alcohol. Research in North America shows that men tend to become more sexually aroused when they think they have been drinking alcohol, even when they have not been drinking it. Women report feeling more sexually aroused when they falsely believe the beverages they have been drinking contained alcohol. Men have show to become more aggressive in laboratory studies when they are drinking only tonic water but believe it contains alcohol, they also become less aggressive when they believe they are drinking only tonic water, but are actually drinking tonic water that contains alcohol.

In Magical Views, the use of alcohol, especially in ritual and rite, is a very powerful vehicle for altering states of consciousness, communicating with spirits, Deities, Ancestors, and entities. It aids in relaxation for ritual. It frees the mind of responsibility and control, and is a great aid to those very logical individuals that have to be “in control”. However it can be detrimental to those who have a lot of natural psychic or medium-ship abilities that have been raised in families or cultures that demonized or invalidated these gifts. As alcohol and drugs impair the left brain first (logical) and enhances right brain activity (where spirit communication and psychic abilities reside), thereby increasing psychic or mystical experiences while under the influence. The affects are dependent on the individual and their type, as it can be dangerous with some people – those susceptible to possession and toying by spirits, excessive drinking is similar to “throwing open the saloon door and calling out to a crowd of alcoholics – ‘Bar is open, drinks are on (in) me’”, which will attract lower astral entities to enter the body and soul to experience the alcohol vicariously through the person. It is easier for spirits to influence one when they are intoxicated, some of which are very “low life” or “demonic” entities. (Many are good and powerful, including Deities like Dionysus, Maeve, etc. but usually associate with the particular elixir being imbibed) Mixing of “Spirits” can be dangerous and very toxic on the body and spirit, as the doorway to the soul can be an orgy of spirits that the person cannot handle, often leading to alcohol poisoning, sickness, illness, and/or death.

Historical: Ancient China had wine jars in Jiahu dating to 7,000 B.C.E. and considered a spiritual food rather than a material food with high importance in religious life. Neolithic wine making was found to date from 5400-5000 B.C.E. as archaeologists uncovered a yellowish residue at Hajji Firuz Tepe in a jar that analysis determined came from wine making. Early brewing dates in Egypt showing alcohol was presided over by the God Osiris. Chalcolithic Era Indus Valley civilizations in India date from 3000-2000 B.C.E. with Hindu Ayurvedic texts describing beneficent uses. Babylonians in 2700 B.C.E. worshiped a wine Goddess and other wine deities. Xenophon (431-351 BCE) and Plato (429-347 BCE) praised moderate use of wine as beneficial to health and happiness, but were critical of drunkenness. Hippocrates (460-370 BCE) praised it for its medicinal properties (wine). Some Native American peoples developed an alcoholic beverage called Pulque or Octli as early as 200 C.E. that was used for visions, religion, and prophecy. The first distillations of spirits came from the Medieval Period, with the School of Salerno in 12th century, and fractional distillation developed by Tadeo Alderotti in 13th century. Distillation of whiskey first performed in Scotland and Ireland for centuries, and the first written confirmation of whiskey comes from Ireland in 1405, Scotland in 1494.

Alcoholic beverages are drinks that contain “ethanol” (a.k.a. “alcohol”). They are divided into three classes: beers, wines, and spirits. “Spirits” often related to distilled beverages low in sugars and containing a minimum of 35% alcohol by volume. These are often referred to as Gin, Vodka, and Rum. Alcohol is legally consumed in most countries, though regulated by over 100 countries in terms of production, sale, and consumption. In most countries and religions, alcohol plays a major role in social events, rituals, and traditional celebrations. Alcohol is a psychoactive drug with a depressant effect that reduces attention and slows reaction speeds. It can be addictive and those addicted are considered to be under the sickness called “alcoholism”. Science shows that alcohol is beneficial in moderate amounts, especially a glass of wine drunk daily as it aids in digestion. If food is eaten before alcohol consumption, it reduces alcohol absorption, and the rate at which alcohol is eliminated from the blood is increased. The mechanism for the faster alcohol elimination appears to be related to types of food especially those with alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and liver blood flow. Consumption of alcoholic drinks during Medieval times was a method used to avoid water-borne diseases such as cholera as alcohol kills bacteria.

Beer:
is the world’s oldest and most widely consumed alcoholic beverage, and the third most popular drink after water and tea. It is produced by brewing and fermenting starches derived from cereal grains – most commonly by means of malted barley, though sometimes with wheat, maize, or rice. There are two main types of beer: Lager and Ale. Ale is classified into varieties such as pale ale, stout, and brown ale. Most beer is flavored with hops adding bitterness and as a natural preservative. Beer is usually 4-6% alcohol by volume, but can be less than 1% or more than 20%. It is a stipend of the drinking culture of most nations, and has social traditions such as beer festivals, pub culture, pub crawls, and pub games. The Christian Bible refers to beer as a brawler. Medieval monks were allotted about five liters of beer per day – allowed to drink beer but not wine during fasts. Many Saints and Deities were associated with Beer, such as: St. Adrian, the patron saint of Beer; St. Amand, patron saint of brewers, barkeepers, and wine merchants; and The Ancient Egyptians believed Osiris gave their people “Beer” as he invented it and it was a necessity of life, brewed in the home on an daily basis. In Ancient Egypt, Cellars and wine presses often had a God who was associated with each of the 17 types of beer they created. These were used for pleasure, nutrition, medicine, ritual, remuneration, and funerary purposes. Babylonians often offered beer and wine to their Deities as offerings.

Wine: Alcoholic beverages distilled after fermentation of non-cereal sources like grapes, fruits, or honey. It involves a longer complete fermentation process and a long aging process (months or years) that create an alcohol content of 9-16% by volume. Sparkling wines are made by adding a small amount of sugar before bottling, creating a secondary fermentation in the bottle. The Bible refers to wine as a symbol of abundance and physical blessing, bringer and concomitant of joy, especially with nourishment and feasting; as well negatively as a mocker. It is commonly drunk with meals, as the Old Testament prescribed it for use in sacrificial rituals and festal celebrations. Jesus’ first miracle was making copious amounts of wine at the wedding feast of Cana where he instituted the ritual of the Eucharist at the Last Supper during a Passover celebration that “wine” is a “new covenant in his blood”. Under the rule of Rome, the average adult male who was a citizen drank an estimated liter (1/4 of a gallon) of wine a day. Thomas Aquinas, a Dominican monk and the “Doctor Angelicus” of the Catholic Church said that moderation in wine is sufficient for salvation but that for certain persons perfection requires abstinence and this was dependent upon their circumstance. Wine has been associated or assigned to various Saints, Deities, and Spirits such as St. Amand, patron saint of brewers, barkeepers, and wine merchants; St. Martin, the so-called patron saint of wine; St. Vincent, and patron saint of vintners. In Ancient Egypt, Cellars and wine presses often had a God who was associated with each of the 24 varieties of wine they created. These were used for pleasure, nutrition, medicine, ritual, remuneration, and funerary purposes. Babylonians in 2700 B.C.E. worshiped a wine Goddess and other wine deities. Babylonians often offered beer and wine to their Deities as offerings. In Greece the art of wine making reached the Hellenic peninsula by 2,000 B.C.E. – the first of which was Mead, and by 1700 BCE wine making was commonplace and incorporated into religious rituals. Balche’, a Mayan Honey wine, was associated with the Mayan deity Acan.

Spirits: Unsweetened, Distilled alcoholic beverages that have an alcohol content of at least 20% ABCV are called spirits. These are produced by the distillation of a fermented base product, which concentrates the alcohol, and eliminates some of the congeners. These can be added to wine to create fortified wines such as ports and sherries.
These are often Vodka, Rum, Gin, Whiskey, Whisky, Tequila, and other spirits.

Some commonly believed changes in personality with ‘types’ of alcohol:

  • Beer: Boldness, Braveness, Becoming Boisterous, Loud, Obnoxious, Lush behavior, Know-it-all attitudes, and Dumb-ness.
  • Wine: Romantic connotations, sexuality, relaxation, restfulness, tranquility, lush-ness.
  • Vodka: Bravery, Boldness, Invincibility, Strength, Attitude, Security.
  • Tequila: Boldness, wildness, sexuality, aggression, and lush behavior.
  • Absinthe: Creativity, Inspiration, Desire to do Art, Write, or Music; imaginative thought. Rumored to be psychedelic and produce hallucinations. Inspires oracles, omens, and prophetic thought.
  • Rum: Wildness, craziness, boldness, and lust.
  • Gin: Intellectual thought, healing, lethargy, and dumb-ness.
  • Whiskey: Aggression, testiness, boldness, violence, invincibility.
  • Irish Whiskey: Revitalization, Rebirth, Renewal, Invincibility, and Intellectual discussions.

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The Phoenix, Canberra

The Phoenix
* 21 East Row * Canberra, Australia Capital Territory, Australia * 2601 * (02) 6247 1606 * http://www.lovethephoenix.com/ *

Although this amazing Irish Pub is one of the few bars/pubs I visited while in Canberra, it is by far my favorite. Introduced to me by Sir Bluey, the place was like home to me when I wandered Canberra on my own, and while hanging with Bluey in downtown Canberra. The Phoenix has been serving Canberra for over 16 years and undoubtedly has the best pints in town, a great festive atmosphere, and a unique decorated environment. It has a very home-like hang-out feel and charm, with real character and art within its dark interior and welcoming couches, chairs, sofas, and tables to relax at. Unlike many Irish pubs, the Phoenix doesn’t buy into the plastic leprechauns and tacky green icons that so many do, it has its own style and decor with odd antiques, mysterious art, and historic wooden furniture. They have a wide selection of beers and ciders, from foreign to local brews, including Kilkenny, Guinness, Magners, and Murphys as well as a stocked bar. They also host quite a few bands and local entertainment. They have stand-up nights called “Bootleg Night” and on various sundays, have a arts and crafts market. What a wonderful pub! Rating: 5 stars out of 5. Visited 4/21/11, 4/22/11, 4/23/11.

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The Local

The Local
* http://thelocal.com.au/MEL/ * The Local Taphouse * 184 Carlisle Street, St Kilda * Melbourne, Victoria, Australia * Tel. 9537 2633 *

Nestled in the heart of St. Kilda lies a friendly pub with dark wooden floors and walls, dark green lamps, couches, tables, and a sociable cosy relaxed atmosphere. It is here that the beer and ale seeker can find local brews, an enormous selection of beers on tap, and an assortment to die for. Upstairs is a courtyard with wooden decks and tables, a fire pit, and large umbrellas over the tables. Perfect for any weather, rain / shine / cold / or hot. Bar upstairs and downstairs, not only does the ambiance of a hidden away local joint shout out at its patrons, and a good spot for drinks, but the food is pretty fabulous as well. Popular for their beer sample paddles, this pub can quench any thirst. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Wild Brumbly Distillery

Wild Brumbly Distillery
* Brad Spalding, Cnr Wollondibby Rd & Alpine Way, Jindabyne NSW Aus 2627 * phone: 02 64571447 * slap2@bigpond.com * http://www.wildbrumby.com/ *

As one travels in the Snowy Mountains just before approaching the skiiers paradise known as “Thredbo” is a distillery known as “Wild Brumbly”. This plant, or should you say “ranch”, mixes together the Australian Mountain life with European tradition. It is home to the story of a young man who grew up on the New South Wale’s fruit belt and the tale of a young Austrian woman who relocated to this distant place. From fruit shop, deli, cafe, and hotel – came the elixir of the finest schnapps to be developed for skiier’s to stay warm and was done so by the families of the Spaldings and Landegger’s coming together to create the Australian Schnapps known as “Wild Brumbly”. Mixed family recipes brought together the fame that it is now. They are open for tours and visits, holding various flavors of schnapps available for imbibing: such as Peach – 18.5% alc; mango – 18.5% alc; pink lady apple – 18.5% alc; Williams Pear – 40% alc; WillyB Pear honey blend – 40% alc; and Butterscotch – 18.5% alc.

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West Wendover, Nevada

West Wendover, Nevada, USA:
* http://www.westwendovercity.com/ *

As you enter Nevada coming from Salt Lake City, Utah – the first town you see in Nevada travelling along I-80 is West Wendover making it a very popular hotspot for the loose laws of Nevada with ever-flowing alcohol 24 hours a day and gambling casinos supporting one’s habits that have been squashed when staying in conservative Utah. It is a small town with just under 5,000 inhabitants (2000 census was 4,721) and sits on the western edge of the Great Salt Lake Desert and is contiguous with Wendover, Utah that it is often confused with. It is Nevada’s only official city to observe Mountain Time Zone (though Jackpot, Nevada unofficially does) as part of its ties with Wendover, Utah. Wendover Nevada is prosperous due to the gambling while Wendover Utah is decaying in crumbles with almost no business tax base. Residents in both cities have voted to annex Wendover into Nevada but such has had a permanent halt by the politicians of Wendover Utah who disagree even though the states of Utah and Nevada as well as the Federal government endorse the idea.

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State of Nevada, USA

Nevada, United States of America:

Nevada is an atypical “Wild West” state of the U.S. that still embraces its history and outlaw appeal with legalized gambling, prostitution, lenient marriage and divorces, and rustic liberal freedoms. The term “Nevada” comes from the Spanish term meaning “snow covered” after the “snow covered mountains” a.k.a. the Sierra Nevada mountain range that is an integral part of the state. The area now known as Nevada was originally inhabited by the Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe tribes prior to European contact. Originally claimed by Spain as part of Alta California until the Mexican War of Independence placed it under Mexican control. The U.S. gained the terrority in 1848 after victory in the Mexican-American War and was eventually incorporated under the Utah Territory in 1850. The Nevada Territory separated from the Utah Territory on March 2, 1861 due to conflicts between non-Mormons and Mormons especiall after the Mountain Meadows massacre of 1857 and the Utah War following it. Nevada became the U.S.’s 36th state in 1864. Nevada was dominated by the mining industry until the late 19th century. Nevada moved from its mining industry into gambling, gaming, and labor as early as 1909 though gaming was banned until 1931 but became a focal point for Las Vegas. Nevada however is still the fourth largest gold producer in the world. 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, in 1951, came the establishment of the Nevada Test Site for the testing of nuclear weapons. The first test was a 1 kiloton of TNT bomb dropped on January 27, 1951. The last atmospheric test was done on July 17, 1962 when testing went underground until September 23, 1992. This locale is best known for the highest concentration of nuclear-detonated weapons in the United States. The Federal government owns over 80% of the state. The remainder of the state had pioneers, homesteaders, and settlers establish their homes near water sources and habitable land. As odd as it would seem since Nevada is quite libertarian with gaming, gambling, and prostitution, it is a very harsh state on non-alcohol drug use. It is the state known for having the harshest penalties for drug offenders in the country. This recently changed in 2006 when voters made it allowable to possess 1 ounce of marijuana for personal use without criminal prosecution and allow its use for medical reasons even though that is still against federal law. Alcohol runs like a river, bars can be open 24 hours a day with no last call and liquor stores, convenience marts, and grocery stores can sell alcohol 24 hours a day. Nevada did enact a smoking ban with the national “Clean Indoor Air Acts” that spread across the U.S. and was effecive December 8, 2006 outlawing smoking in workplaces and public areas. However, smoking is still allowed in bars that do not serve food, and permitted in casinos, hotel rooms, brothels, and tobacco shops. For the last five years, Nevada has been ranked as the most dangerous state in the United States just above Louisiana with a 24% higher crime rate than the national average placing it highest for robbery and motor vehicle theft and 3rd in highest murder rate. Nevada is primarily mostly desert and semi-arid climate regions with summer temperatures as high as 125 degrees Fahrenheit and evening winter temperatures as low as negative 50 degrees. Average rainfall is roughly 7 inches though some areas of the state can achieve 40. Nevada’s capital city is Carson City and the entire state boasts about a 2.7 million population with most of it located in Las Vegas. Nevada is bordered to the west by California, to the north by Oregon and Idaho, to the South by Arizona, to the East by Utah, and the Southeast by New Mexico.

Please Come Back Soon. This page is being created.

This page is in progress and updates will be frequent in the near future, please come back soon for more content and photos If you are a business or attraction that has been reviewed here and would like to add details, a re-review, or to request an update please email Technogypsie @ gmail . com (remove spaces)
This page was last updated on 8/16/2015

    References:

  • Baurley, Thomas 2015 Alternative America: Travel Guide to the U.S.A. Technogypsie Publications, Riverside, California.
  • McGowan, Leaf 2015 Magical America. Technogypsie Publications, Riverside, California.
  • Wikipedia 2015 “United States of America” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Website https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States referenced 8/16/15.

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Dublin City Pub Crawl

Dublin City Pub Crawl
* Meet at At The Porterhouse Central, 45-47 Nassau Street, at the end of Grafton Street near Trinity College
* 47 Nassau St * Dublin 2, Co. Dublin, Ireland * 086 864 3270 * http://www.facebook.com/thedublincitypubcrawl/ * http://www.thedublincitypubcrawl.com/ *

The first time I ever did a (paid)(business) pub crawl in Europe, it was in Amsterdam and I was very impressed. I’ve done numerous “party” pub crawls, usually with a theme – pirates, santas, zombies, or what-not with a community of friends but seldom do I do one to get to know a city as I’m usually the explore on my own type. Having had such a great experience with the Amsterdam one, I figured Dublin would be pretty fabulous. A couple of issues here however for me – I’m not a beer drinker (only wine and mixed drinks), I’m not much into pubs and bars (more nightclubs where dancing is available), and I definitely don’t really care for mainstream establishments. So any paid “Pub Crawl” has alot to compete with to charm me. However, for those that do love pubs, these are usually the beast that you want to ride when travelling to a new city and wanting to get to know what the nightlife is and make friends with fellow travellers. The other conditions for the night that affected my experience as well is – I attended on a week night (Thursday night) (and no matter where in the world you are venturing, weeknights are more dead than weekend nights) and I attempted to go on the Backpacker’s Pub Crawl prior to showing up at this one which left me and 3 others hanging with no one showing up to tell us it was cancelled. The 4 of us from the Backpacker Pub Tour no show wandered over to the Porterhouse to see if we could still get into the Dublin City Pub Crawl. A charming young woman was our guide and host. So even though there were only 4 of us (5 including the guide) we were going to make the best of it. She was an excellent host and guide. She knew her establishments and her drinks. So first off, lets rate the Guide as a top 5 out of 5 Guides. However the tour dynamics itself were poor. There was a free drink at the Porterhouse, and free cover at one of the clubs, but overall not much given out (unlike Amsterdam’s crawl – which is not fair to compare to so I won’t let it affect my rating). It was poorly attended and not many friends to be made (again, A Thursday). For €15 its a good deal and way to get to know nightlife Dublin. Discounts exist in ad racks at the hostels. They take you to four pubs and then a late bar/ dance club at the end of the journey. 15% off all food at the Porterhouse Central (be there by 8 to order), free appetizers in the 2nd pub, free Irish beer sampling, and discounted drinks at some establishments ( €4 pints; €5 cocktails; and a (to pay) option for pouring your own pint of Guinness off tap). Some of the establishments have live traditional Irish music, free VIP entry into Dandelion Night Club which was a fun little mainstream club. Tour Guide: Rated 5 stars out of 5. Tour: 3.5 stars out of 5.

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Jameson Distillery – Dublin

Jameson Distillery
* 7 Bow Street * Dublin 7, Co. Dublin, Ireland * 01 807 2355 * http://www.jamesonwhiskey.com/ *

Irish Whiskey is the bloodstream of the Irish. Of course the most traditional of which is Bushmills. However Bushmill’s up and coming, modern edge and adapting to the future tastes of the world is Jameson Irish Whiskey which was introduced in 1780. Jameson Irish Whiskey is a single distillery whiskey produced by a division of the famous Absinthe distillers “Pernod Ricard”. They focus on the “single distillery” principle as opposed to the “single malt” tradition, yet combines malted barley with unmalted or ‘green’ barley giving credence to their infamous ‘pure pot still’ distillation tradition. They take locally grown barley, sourced within a 50 mile radius of the Cork distillery, dry it in a closed kiln fired by clean-burning anthracite coal to preserve the flavor, and triple distilled for optimum smoothness for balance in hat no one flavor will over power the other thus creating a sweet tasting whiskey. The Company was started by John Jameson as the “Bow Street Distillery” in Dublin in 1780. James was a Scottsman who had married into a Scotch whiskey family – the Steins. James began one of the six main Dublin Whiskeys to be produced, even though Jameson today is distilled in Cork and some vatting takes place in Dublin, with distillery tours held in both cities. Jameson boasts of annual sales of over 31 million bottles and holds the record for being the third largest single distillery whiskey in the world and the best selling Irish Whiskey in the world. The Jameson Distillery tour was 5 times better than the Bushmills Distillery Tour, and much more worth your money. It also includes a whiskey tasting at the end and unlike Bushmills, Jameson with its modern edge explorations, highly encourage you to mix your whiskey with other elements to explore the diversity of taste, sensation, and change of consciousness …. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

They produce:

  • Jameson Original
  • Jameson 12 Year Old Special Reserve (Formerly known as Jameson 1780)
  • Jameson 12 Year Old Distillery Reserve
  • Jameson Gold Reserve
  • Jameson 18 Year Old Limited Reserve
  • Jameson Rarest Vintage Reserve
  • Jameson Signature Reserve

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Wormwood: Artemisia absinthium


Wormwood

The Poison Garden, Blarney Castle, Ireland

Wormwood
Artemisia absinthium [ Plantae: Angiosperms: Eudicots: Asterids: Asterales: Asteraceae: Artemisia: Artemisia absinthium ]

Common Names:
Wormwood, absinthium, absinthe wormwood, common wormwood, Green Ginger or grand wormwood

Localities:
Temperate Eurasia and Northern Africa; naturalized in much of North America.

Description:
Wormwood is a herbaceous perennial plant with a hard woody rhizome, straight stems that grow upwards of .8-1.2 meters tall, are grooved, branched, and silvery green spirally arranged leaves in color on the top leaf with white below covered in silky silvery-white trichomes bearing minute oil-producing glands. The bipinnate to tripinnate basal leaves with long petioles can achieve up to 25 cm length, and its cauline leaves located on the stem are smaller with 5-10 cm length which are less divided and hosting short petioles and simple sessile uppermost leaves. Wormwood produced spherical bent-down headed tubular pale yellow flowers that cluster and appear leafy and branched panicles from early summer and autumn. The plant creates a small achene fruit that disperses seeds by gravity.

Species:
There are over 400 species of artemisia.

Cultivation:
Wormwood best grows on uncultivated arid ground in rocky slopes, along footpaths, and in fields. It is easiest cultivated in dry soil, but initially should be planted under bright exposure in fertile mid-weight soils rich in nitrogen. It is propogated by growth cuttings in March or October, or via seeds planted in starter beddings. It is often harvested in the spring when it is young for cooking and alcohol additives.

Common Uses:
Often used as an additive in insect sprays for plants. Good for companion planting because of this as its roots secrete inhibiting effects on the growth of other plants, especially weeds, and can repel insect larvae. It is used to repel fleas and moths in houses.

Culinary Uses:
It is the major ingredient in Absinthe alcohol as well as a flavoring for other spirits and wines, including bitters, vermouth, and pelinkovac. In the Middle Ages it was used to spice Mead. It is also a traditional color and flavor agent for green songpyeon (steamed dumpling) eaten during the Korean Thanksgiving festival. In Morrocco it is added to mint tea.

Medicinal Uses:
Wormwood contains thujone, tannic and resinous substances, malic acid, and succinic acid. Medicinally it is used as a stomachic, antispasmodic, cholagogue, tonic, antiseptic, carminative, febrifuge, and anthelmintic. It is known for combatting indigestion, gastric pain, or as an antiseptic. It has been an ingredient in teas to help pregnant women during labor pains. It is also used as a cardiac stimulant to improve blood circulation. Its pure oil is very poisonous. Used to attack intenstinal worms.

Magical Uses:

Folklore and History:
Wormwood comes from the Greek “Apsinthion” which may mean “unenjoyable” referring to its bitter nature. The name “Wormwood” comes from Middle English “Wormwode” and nicknamed as such for its beneficial combat for intestinal worms. The Latin “Artemisia” is named after the Greek wife and sister of the Persian King Mausolous. She was an infamous botanist and medical researcher for her time.


Wormwood

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Common Rue: Ruta Graveolens

Main article is now located at: http://www.treeleavesoracle.org/treelore/?p=1307
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Ruta Graveolens / RUE
The Poison Garden, Blarney Castle, Ireland

Rue: Ruta Graveolens
Ruta Graveolens [ Plantae: Angiosperms: Eudicots: Rosids: Sapindales: Rutaceae: Rutoideae: Ruteae: Ruta: Ruta Graveolens ]

Common Names:

Localities:
Commonly found throughout the Mediterranean, Southern Europe, Macaronesia, and southwest Asia.

Description:
Rue is a hardy evergreen shrubby plant that is highly scented disagreeble odor, ranging from 20-60 cm tall, with upwards of 8-40 species. The most popular “Rue” is “Common Rue”. Stems are woody in the lower part, Its leaves are alternate tripinnate or bipinnate with feathery appearance, green to blue green in color hosting yellow flowers with 4-5 petals that are approximately 1 cm in diameter usually from June to September, eventually forming 4-5 lobed capsulated fruit that hosts numerous sees.

Species:
Ruta angustifolia – Egyptian Rue; Ruta chalepensis – Fringed Rue; Ruta corsica – Corsican Rue; Ruta graveolens – Common Rue; Ruta montana – Mountain Rue

Cultivation:
Grows anywhere, but thrives best in partially sheltered and dry areas. It can be propogated by seeds sown outside and scattered in spring, raking and beds kept free of weeds so that the seedlings when 2 inches high can be transplanted into fresh beds. Best to allow 18 inch spacing. With cuttings done in the spring, insert in soil until well rooted in shady borders or by rooted slips taken in spring until readily grown. Poor, dry, rubbishy soil is very good.

Common Uses:
Often used to ward off fleas and other biting insects and a common herbal insect repellent.

Culinary Uses:
Rue is very bitter with a nauseous taste, but utilized in many Middle Eastern cuisines, especially as an additive to grappa in Italy. It was a common element to ancient Roman recipes. Often added to salads.

Medicinal Uses:
Used for much medicine in England, it is a main ingredient for poison antidotes. Piperno the physician in 1625 recommended Rue to combat epilepsy, vertigo, and malady – often to be worn around the neck of the sufferer. Pliny claimed it was good to improve eyesight and focus. Believed by Italian artists to make eyesight sharp and clear aiding in detailed drawings. Juice of Rue is often utilized to fend off ear aches. It was seen early to ward off contagion, attacks of fleas, and other insects. Culpepper recommends it for sciatica and pains in the joints, also for shaking fits of agues, etc. Volatile oil made from rue contains caprinic, plagonic, caprylic, and oenanthylic acids as well as rutin. Often distilled from the fresh herb used as a wine, decoctions and infusions for medicinal usage or tea as an emmenogogue. In large quantities it is an acro-narcotic poison. Used sometimes to address hysterical affections, coughs, croup, colic, and flatulence as it is a mild stomachic. On the skin its an active irritant and sometimes used as a rubefacient, helping ease the severe pains of sciatica. it can risk dermatitis on the skin and cause rashes, especially if under the hot sun when oils are rich on the outside, it can blister skin like a poison ivy rash. Taken as a tea often used to combat nervous nightmares and leaves rubbed to the temples are said to relieve headaches. However, taking the plant intself internally has been known to produce vomiting, convulsions, and stomach pains. The compresses of the leaves applied to chests can combat chronic bronchitis. Leaves chewed are believed to calm nervous headaches, giddiness, hysterical spasms, and palpitations.

Magical Uses:
The Ancient Greeks see it as a “anti-magical herb” because it served as remedies to nervous indigestion they suffered when eating before strangers which was blamed on witchcraft. Throughout the Middle Ages it was seen as a powerful defense against witches and a main ingredient in many spells. Crushed herb is known to ward off evil spirits and witches. Rue is also believed to summon second sight. Holy water was sprinkled with rue brushes at ceremonies preceding Sunday celebrations of high mass, giving it the name Herb of Repentance or Herb of Grace. Often boiled together with treacle, conserving the rue, and used to cure croup in poultry or to fend off diseases in cattle.

Folklore and History:
The name comes from “Ruta” (Greek ‘reuo’) meaning “to set free” as the herb is known to be very good at affecting various diseases. Used by many ancient cultures, it was written about by Hippocrates who commended it as a chief ingredient for combating poisons in antidotes. Said by Gerard that “If a man be anointed with the juice of rue, the poison of wolf’s bane, mushrooms, or toadstooles, the biting of serpents, stinging of scorpions, spiders, bees, hornets and wasps will not hurt him.”, it was commonly sprinkled in houses to kill all the feas and as an insecticide. It is one of the ingredients in the “Vinegar of the Four Thieves”. It is the floral symbol of repentance, sorrow, and of regret.


Rue
The Poison Garden, Blarney Castle, Ireland

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Irish Whiskey


The Waters of Life: Irish Whiskey

“Fuisce” or “Uisce beatha” means “Water of Life” in Irish Gaelic. It is also the term for “Irish Whiskey”. It refers to whiskey that is made in Ireland. It is believed to be one of the earliest distilled beverages in Europe, dating back to the mid-12th century. Barley based spirits first appear in Irish records in 1556. In the early days, it is believed, that almost every town in Ireland had a distillery and by the end of the 18th century, there were over 2,000 stills in operation. By late 19th century there were over 400 brands of Irish Whiskey being sold in the United States, but after Prohibition, many of the distilleries had to close down. Irish Whiskey traditionally comes in 4 types – Single Malt, Single Grain, Pure Pot Still, and Blended Whiskey. Irish whiskey is distilled three times whereas its close neighbour “Scotch” is distilled twice (with the exception of Auchentoshan). The Irish rarely use peat during the malting process, so Irish Whiskey comes out with a smoother finished taste as opposed to Scotch Whisky’s earthy overtones. There are notable exceptions to these rules in both countries, but that is the standard difference between Scotch and Irish Whisk(e)y. (Connemara creates a Peated Irish Malt Whiskey). Unique to the Irish is the designation of pure pot still whiskey even though all single malt Scotch is produced ‘pot still’ methodology, the single malts from Ireland is called ‘pure pot still’ to differentiate it from most other Irish Whiskeys referring to whiskey made from 100% barley, mixed malt and unmalted, and distilled in a pot still. Green unmalted barley gives traditional pure pot still whiskey a unique spicy flavor in Irish whiskey. Scotland has 90 distilleries, while Ireland only has four. Ireland’s four are: New Midleton Distillery (Jameson, Powers, Paddy, Midleton, Redbreast); Old Bushmills Distillery (all Old Bushmills, Black Bush, 1608, Bushmills 10-, 12- and 16- and 21-year-old single malts); Cooley Distillery (Connemara, some Knappogues, Tyrconnell); and Kilbeggan distillery. There are a few independently owned Irish Whiskey brands such as Tullamore Dew and the Irishman. Irish Whiskey is commonly used as a sacrement in the Water’s of Life ceremony in some traditions of modern Neo-Pagan Druidism such as in Ar nDraoicht Fein: ADF – A Druid Fellowship.

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Old Bushmills Distillery


Bushmills Distillery

Bushmills Distillery
* The Distillery * 2 Distillery Rd, Bushmills BT57 8XH, United Kingdom/Northern Ireland * 028 2073 1521 * www.bushmills.com *

Bushmills is the home of the identically named Irish Malt Whiskey that is distilled in the Old Bushmills Distillery. This Distillery is the oldest licensed whiskey distillery in the world. Bushmills has been manufacturing since 1608 for over 400 years. They are also notorious for their Single Malt Whiskies called “Bushmills” and “Black Bush”. “Irish Whiskey” is also called the “Uisce Beatha” which means “Water of Life” in Irish Gaelic. Bushmills is known for their warm, distinctive tastes and the arts/craft used by the Distillery to distill them, which has been passed down for generations. The Distillery hosts daily 2 hour tours educating visitors in the process and craft as well as providing tasting opportunities. Bushmills utilizes the magical waters from the Springs of St. Columb’s Rill, processes it, runs it through triple distillation in its copper stills, then matures the spirits in oak casks. Irish Malt Whiskeys are closely related to the Scotch Malt Whisky with the differences of Irish Whiskey is spelt with an “e”, and in Scotland the malted barley acquires a peaty smoky character as it is dried whereas Bushmills is never smoked thereby granting it a honeyed malt flavor. Bushmills is very proud of its ingredients and processes. Bushmills is gluten free (distillation removes glutens from the cereals), is Kosher (status awarded by Chief Rabbinate of Ireland) and are suitable for vegans and vegetarians as they are made from barley, corn, or wheat, and other cereal grains, water, and yeast. They are distilled in oak casks which previously only contained spirit or fortified wine – no animal products used in production. Bushmills is healthy, and a 25 ml serving of the whiskey is only 56 calories and an ABV alcoholic strength of 40% (alcohol by volume). The Distillery reserves typically range from 50 to 60% abv.

It began in 1608 when the distillery became licensed by King James I. By 1784 the Distillery became an officially registered company and word spread of the elixir especially from 1740-1910 with the Irish emigrants to the USA. The 1920’s Prohibition in the United States banning sale and consumption of alcohol harshly hurt Bushmills but they managed to ride through it even though at many levels they were dependent on sales from the USA. The Director at the time, Wilson Boyd, took the advantageous step in predicting the end of Prohibition and had ready to export large stores of whiskey. Isaac Wolfson bought Bushmills after WWII, and the Irish Distillers group took it over in 1972 controlling all Irish whiskey at the time suffering serious neglect as their whiskey stocks decreased in order to increase market shares of Jameson Whiskey which is Irish Distiller’s main brand. The French group Pernod Ricard took over Bushmills in 1988 and then in 2005 it was purchased by Diageo for 200 million pounds.

    Bushmills produces:

  • White Bush – Bushmills White Label, Bushmills Original – Blend of single malt Irish whiskey and Irish grain whiskey that is matured in American oak casks.
  • Black Bush – Premiere blend with more proportion of malt to grain whiskey than the Whie. Selected Spanish Oloroso sherry-seasoned oak casks are used to mature the malt before it is blended with delicate sweet single grain whiskey. Created in 1934.
  • Bushmills 10 year single malt – Matured in American bourbon barrels for 10 years.
  • Bushmills 12 year Single Malt – A special edition sold only at the Bushmills distillery that is matured mostly in sherry casks.
  • Bushmills 16 Year Single Malt – matured for 16 years or more in a combination of American bourbon barrels, Spanish Oloroso sherry butts, and Port pipes.
  • Bushmills 21 Year Single Malt – A limited number of 21 year bottles are made annually and matured in 3 different types of casks – first in American bourbon barrels and then in Spanish Oloroso sherry casks for 19 years, then in Madeira drums for 2 more years before bottling.
  • Bushmills 1608 – Special 400th Anniversary whiskey containing 95% malt and 5% grain whiskey made with 30% crystal malt for smoothness. Now only available at the Distillery and in Duty Free.

Rating of the tour: As a big fan of Bushmills, I was pretty excited to see the distillery. I was a bit discouraged after the tour as I didn’t see anything in operation and thought it was very dry and boring. The tour guide however knew her stuff and did an excellent job with the presentation. Of course the samples of Bushmills were delicious and spirited, but after taking the Jameson distillery tour (even though they weren’t producing) which was 100 times better, I look back at the Bushmills tour and felt ripped off with the admission they charged. Rating: 2 stars out of 5 for the Tour; 5 stars out of 5 for the liquor.

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Fat Frog

Fat Frog

Irish mixed drink

is a Mixed Drink that combines together three of Europe’s most popular selling 5% “alcopops” or “malt beverages” and is commonly found in Britain and Ireland, even pre-bottled for convenience marts. This is a mix of 1/3 Smirnoff® Ice; 1/3 Bacardi Breezer® Orange; 1/3 WKD® Original Vodka Blue. Commonly, to make one, one would take 2 pint glasses, pour one half of Smirnoff Ice into one pint glass and the rest in another glass, then repeated with the Orange, followed by the Blue … once mixed together they turn green. Add ice and serve. Rating: 2 stars out of 5.


“Fat Frog” in a Bottle

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Captain Morgan


Captain Morgan Spiced Rum

I’ve been a fan of Captain Morgan’s for a very long time. Good with coke, hurricanes, tropical drinks, or alone … it’s an all time favorite. The label uses the slogan “Calling all Captains!” Captain Morgan, named after the 17th century Caribbean privateer from Wales – Sir Henry Morgan, it is a spiced rum produced by the Diageo alcohol conglomerate of Britain. “Captain Morgan Rum Company” evolved from the Levy Brothers “Long Pond” distillery where their pharmacy purchased raw rum and mixed it with medicinal herbs and spices. Seagram CEO Bronfman stumbled upon the elixir and purchased the distillery from the Jamaican government in 1944. In the 1950’s the U.S. Government and Puerto Rico created a number of economic incentives to create jobs in Puero Rico and reducing rum taxes imported into the U.S. from Puerto Rico making the area a enticing location for making and exporting the rum. Seagram’s and Bacardi families built large plants near San Juan, they moved the Captain Morgan production to Destileria Serralles, granting the right to produce “Captain Morgan” brand until 2012. In 1984 Captain Morgans was introduced into the United States. By 2001, Seagrams sold “Captain Morgan” brand to Diageo. 2008 Diageo announced they would build and operate the main distillery on St. Croix, in the Virgin Islands beginning in 2010. Today, Captain Morgan is by volume the second largest brand of spirits in the United States, and the 7th largest in the world. It is still labelled a product of Puerto Rico. The Captain Morgan produced by J. Wray and Nephew Ltd. is labelled a “product of Jamaica” based on its origination. The rum is distilled from sugar cane, combined with various types of yeast for the fermentation process, distillation method, aging conditions, and blending techniques is what they use to get different characteristics in the rum brands. They mix together the sugars with molasses, water, mash, and yeast – and then distill in a continuous still to make the Original Spiced Rum. Once distilled, the clear spirits are aged in oak barrels for a year which introduces the golden color and character to the rum before flavors and spices are added. All spices utilized are indigenous to the Caribbean. Captain Morgan is available in the “Original Spiced Rum” (most popular – 70 proof), A Dark Rum (mix of Caribbean and Canadian Rum – 80 proof); Parrot Bay (White rum with varieties of coconut, mango, pineapple, passion fruit, key lime, orange, and strawberry – 42 proof); Lime Bite (silver lime spiked spiced rum – 70 proof); Private Stock (dark full body with island spices – 80 proof); Tattoo (extra dark with berry/citrus made to compete with Jagermeister – 70 proof); 100 Proof (newest – highest alcohol content); and Deluxe Dark (dark Caribbean rums aged in white oak barrels, only available in Canada – 80 proof). I’ve always only purchased the full bodied bottles, but whilst in a trip to Dublin, Ireland – found it in a can mixed with cola at a convenience store.

    Ratings:
  • Captain Morgan’s Spiced Rum: 4.75 stars out of 5
  • Dark Rum – 5 stars out of 5
  • Parrot Bay – 4.50 stars out of 5.
  • Tattoo – 5 stars out of 5.
  • Captain Morgan and Cola in a Can : 2.5 stars out of 5.


Captain Morgan in a Can
Dublin, Ireland

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Hard Rock Cafe Dublin

Hard Rock Dublin
* 12 Fleet Street, Dublin, Co. Dublin City – 01 6717777 * www.hardrock.com *
I’ll be honest … I’m not a big fan of chains or Hard Rock Cafes. The only time I usually enter one is when I’m with friends who are fans … such as was the case for my visit to the Dublin one. The setup for these cafes are pretty similar wherever you go I find, and the memorabilia on the walls and in the cases are the usual lot of “this belonged to so n’ so” and “this was used is such n’ such”. Not much different than the movie fan chain of Club Hollywood, just for the Music industry. The food was mediocre pub food, and the drinks pricey. Some interesting and unique art/stuff for Ireland. Anyhow, if you’re a fan of Hard Rock Cafes … this one will please you as its the only one in all of Ireland, as the one in Northern Ireland was closed down. The Dublin one was established in June 29, 2004. They pride themselves for their unique collectibles just like all the other Hard Rock’s … in this case a pair of Bono’s sunglasses, a favorite shirt of Elvis, Paul McCartney’s “Beatle Boots”, one of Madonna’s jackets, a Paul Stanley guitar, and a Mimi Hendrix rug. Rating: 1 star out of 5.

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Vertigo (Truro, Cornwall)

Vertigo
* 15 St Marys Street, Truro, TR1 2AF * Cornwall, England * T: 01872 276555 • E: info@vertigotruro.com * http://www.vertigo-truro.co.uk/
A great little hole-in-the-wall art-deco upmarket Cafe Bar in Truro, Cornwall. The place is very stylish and comfortable with couches, tables, and lounging environment. The bar offers delicious cocktails, tapas, teas, and coffess. Great food and snacks available. Now dwelling in the former old court house, this three story building has a garden, conservatory, dining area, and bar. It is also a place where you can get married as they hold a wedding license. The place has four different themed rooms. The establishment is owned and operated by hotelier Carolien Davidson, Jodie Phillips, and Neil Barku. I found the place very artsy, hospitable, and friendly. I enjoyed the fare, even though it was very small portions, it was well priced. Rating : 4 stars out of 5.

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Trader Joe’s (Queen Anne, Seattle, WA)

Trader Joe’s * 112 Galer Street, Seattle, WA 98119 * (206) 378-5536 * Website: http://www.traderjoes.com/locations/map/135.asp *

Trader Joes is my most favorite grocery store, though this location is not one of its better stores in the selection and space venue. Still, good enough for the fix I needed today. Trader Joes is a “Unique Grocery Store” with a unique selection of goods, groceries, and food stuffs from all over at very low prices. Originally a small outlet in California, it has quickly grown in popularity from coast-to-coast. When I live in a city where there is a Trader Joes, that’s the only place I shop. Rated: (storewide: 5 stars out of 5, this store: 4 out of 5) I of course grabbed some of my favorites for the camping venture this weekend: Vanilla soy milk, Chai, panang curry thai tuna, cashew butter, blackberry jelly, homemade wheat bread, macadamian carmel popcorn, the famous $2.95/bottle wines, and other munchies. Visited again on 7/5/09.

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Apogaea 2009


Volcano Burn at Apogaea 2009

Apogaea 2009
http://www.apogaea.com

Happy Ass Ranch, Lake George, Colorado * Annually each June * Colorado’s Regional Burn *

Every year the local Colorado Burner community puts together a regional burn in central eastern Colorado called “Apogaea”. An amazing festival of arts, sustainability, and community with leave-no-trace green thumbs on a wild ranch on 140 private acres of Rocky Mountain forested land blended with a community ethic to attain self-sufficiency, production of renewable energy, creation of agricultural base, and the development of mineral resources and mining reclamation. They possess a low-impact approach supportive of environmental preservation. The lands are surrounded by Pikes National Forest. Apogaea is a great testing ground for the local Burning Man community to set up and test their theme camp ideas for Burning Man. This year the theme was a sacrifice of the virgin offering to the Volcano Gods … incredible fire spinning and dancing, ritualized dramatic performances, and a festive dance around the bonfire. Dozens of theme camps and DJ booths, wild parties, workshops, and special events. Art installations and theme camps. Bodypainting. Contact Improv. Cuddle Camp. Safe Sex Play. Dancing. Hulahooping. Camel racing. Color book sessions. Multi-colored goats that you could learn how to milk. Pancake and bacon breakfasts and parties. Xpat Alien parties at the Crop Circle Cantina. Festivity, Friends, and Community. Apogaea is simply amazing. Highly recommended especially for any Burning Man enthusiasts and community. Galleries, photos, and items are located here: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?cat=233. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. [ Photos on Flickr ]


Crop Circle Cantina



View Apogaea: Day 1 [ Myspace ] ; Day 2 [ Myspace ] [ Technogypsie.com ] [ Techno-Gypsy.livejournal.com ] : Photogalleries: [ Myspace Photos (does not contain nudity) ] uncensored: [ ColoradoBurn.ning – Day 6/5/09 ] [ Rest on ColoradoBurn.ning ] [ FlickR ]

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Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 15, Part C (4/9) -Amsterdam Pub Crawl

Part C


Ultimate Party Pub Crawl

Thursday, 9 April 2009
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

After an afternoon’s rest, Sir Thomas Leaf and Princess Brea were ready to hit the bars and clubs – partying all night long. They hopped the bus to the meeting place at News Cafe on Korte Leidse dwarsstraat. With some time to spare, the duo grabbed some gelato, watched the dj in the H&S, and wandered the streets where Breanna bought some souvenirs at the 5 Euro shop. As the doors to the News Cafe opened, they paid their 14 Euro and got their bracelets. Entering the News Cafe, they were doused with unlimited cranberry and vodka shots – well essentially captured a bottle for themselves and boozed up. Then met a dozen of new cool friends who they partied with as the pub crawl wandered from bar to bar, club to club – with free drinks at each of the 6 clubs, vodka shots on the road between the clubs, cover charges covered, and numerous drink specials. Princess Brea wore out earlier than Sir Thomas Leaf and braved the route back to the hostel – as she said she was taking the bus, she wound up deciding to walk on her own for a couple of hours until a cab was nice enough to give her essentially a free ride. Sir Thomas Leaf was not impressed that she didn’t come back for him when the bus was not a choice. He left an hour later – and a couple of bars later, to find the same situation, making his way by foot across Amsterdam trying to find Centraal Station for the ride home. Both made it back to the hostel safely but it had its moments. Incredible fun time was had …

Continue reading Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 15, Part C (4/9) -Amsterdam Pub Crawl

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News Cafe Amsterdam, the Netherlands

The News Cafe
Korte Leidsedwarsstraat 77/B * Amsterdam * 020-6261838 * http://www.theagenda.nl/e6139_cafe-the-news.html?eID=35501
A nice little private club on the Korte Leidsedwarsstraat that is the first stop off of the daily Amsterdam Ultimate Party Pub Crawl. Its a cozy little bar with friendy and professional staff. Just like most of the clubs, when I ordered a Rum and Coke, I got the shot of rum in a glass and a bottle of coke for me to mix since for some reason they don’t mix drinks even though they have stocked bars. Apparently its a Amsterdam club thing. The music was good and plenty of music videos. Rating: 3 stars out of 5. Continue reading News Cafe Amsterdam, the Netherlands

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The Ultimate Party Amsterdam Pub Crawl (Amsterdam/Netherlands)


Ultimate Party – Amsterdam Pub Crawl

Ultimate Party Pub Crawl – Amsterdam
Ultimate Party is every Sunday to Friday / 6 Nights a week * Starting : between 08:30 pm and 09:00 pm @ The News Cafe – 4 doors down from the Burger King Leidseplein ( Korte Leidse dwarsstraat 77) * Transportation: Tram 1,2,5,6,7,10 to the Leidseplein *

  • · 6 Dance Bars & Clubs
  • · 6 Free drinks ( beer,wine or soda)
  • · Vodka shots on the road
  • · Unlimited Free house shots between 08:30 and 09:00 pm
  • · Drink specials at each venue
  • · No cover charges for the Bars and Club
  • · Professional Guides
  • ALL FOR ONLY 15 EURO

http://www.joinultimateparty.com/

I have to admit, I’ve never done a pub crawl like this before. Very well thought out, organized, social, and a great way to introduce tourists to a city’s night life. I almost want to start up my own. I’ve been on many alternative themed pub crawls like the SantaCon’s, the Pirate hunts, and the Zombie crawls … but this was quite nice, a normal one for international tourists – partying in the big cities around the world. Apparently they have them for London, Madrid, Berlin, etc. I had a blast. The guides were fantastic and made sure we got drunk and kept safe. One of the best parties I’ve attended while travelling abroad. You pay your 15 Euro (we paid 14 as we had a coupon from Stacey from New Amsterdam Tours), they give you a bracelet, and unlimited vodka drinks/shots from 8:30-9:30. Friends were made and we headed to 6 different bars and clubs, at each cover was free, VIP entrance in, and you were greeted at the door with a vodka shot and a token for a free drink at the bar. For each and every bar: The News, The Pirates Cafe, Amsterdamned, The Royalty, Club Smokeys, Club JV, Jantjes Verjaardag, Cooldown Cafe, and Surprise Bar. Dancing, drinking, and drunken-ness ensued. Wild times. Thank you Ultimate Party! Rating 5 stars out of 5.

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The Druid (Nuremberg, Germany)



The Druid
* Weißgerbergasse 18 * 90403 Nürnberg, Germany * +49 911 2059072 * www.thedruidpub.com

A great little Irish/English pub in the heart of the Nurnberg Old Town. It’s an authentic traditional Irish pub located on one of the most beautiful medieval streets in the city; housed in a four story 12th century building, next to Club Sixteen; it encompassed the first two floors and basement. Decorated with old timber, uneven stairs, and rough stone walls – it brings the charm of Ireland into Germany. Great whiskey and cottage pie. I’ve heard good things about the fish n’ chips and the beer as well. Staff was great. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

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Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 10, Part B – Nürnberg: Graveyards, Gamers, and Drinking

Part B

Saturday, 4 April 2009
Nürnberg, Germany

From the Nibulengenmuseum, a brief hike back to Lady Vanessa’s motor-carriage, with a pit stop at at the fish stop and bakery for some travel munchies, the adventurers were on their way to Nürnberg to meet up with Lady Vanessa’s and Sir Christian’s gathering of friends who periodically meet up in a regional city to network on a online RPG game in German they all play together. A few hours later and the delvers arrived in Nürnberg ….

Continue reading Lady of the Rhine, Sect 2: Chapter 10, Part B – Nürnberg: Graveyards, Gamers, and Drinking

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Drink Cards in Germany



Drink Cards (Verzehrkarte)

When clubbing in Germany at dance clubs; you are issued a card usually maximum 26 or 50 Euro that has sections checked off for how much you spend on drinks and items in the bar. As you order a drink or food, the Euros are checked off. It is not customary to tip at clubs or bars in Germany, unless they bring drinks to your table, and its no more than 10% or simply rounding up to the nearest Euro. When leaving the club, you pay off your card at the register before exiting all of your drinking damage. If you lose the card, you pay the maximum on the card. Same practice also applies in bars and pubs, however, they usually just check mark or write the Euro price down on your coaster and you pay at the end.

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Bionade


Bionade

Bionade

Germany’s organic fermented carbonated water, a type of natural softdrink you can find in Europe. Rumor on the street is that Coca Cola attempted to buy them out. Nice easy taste and mellow flow with a peppy up. It is manufactured in the Bavarian town of Ostheim vor der Rhön (Germany) by the Peter beer brewery now owned by Dieter Leipold. He got the idea of creating this non-alcoholic drink using the same beer making principles within the same purity laws that Europe is famous for – no corn syrup or artificial additives, fermenting it with natural ingredients such as malt, water, sugar, and fruit essences. It took 8 years of experimentation with over 1.5 million Euro in his bathroom lab to develop this drink. Isolating a strain of bacteria capable of converting the sugar into a nonalcoholic gluconic acid which is used to ferment the drink. His methodology is secret. As soon as the product was released it became a trendy drink in Europe – starting in small bars and restaurants in Hamburg, moving across Germany. They advertise it as a drink tasting like soft drinks but healthier than the average high-sugar soft drinks. Bionade became available to most of the world by 2007 and can be found throughout Europe, the United States, Austria, Australia, Switzerland, Scandinavia, the Benelux countries, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Spain, Portugal, and Ireland. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

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Uerige Obergarige Hausbrauerie (Duesseldorf, Germany)

Uerige Obergarige Hausbrauerie GmbH * Bergerstrasse 1 * 40213 Dusseldorf * 021186699-0 * http://uerige.de
A little brewery known since 1862 as the top-fermenting house brewery in Dusseldorf, UERIGE is one of Dusseldorf’s notorious brews. Located in the heart of the old town center: The Altstadt right close to the Rhine River embankment and promenade. Some say, these beers have bee brewed according to the Reinheitsgebot, the Purity Law dating to 1516. They bring their dark Uerige beer to your table as soon as you sit down, you don’t have to order as they just expect you want one. Food is limited, more appetizers than actual meals, famous for their pea soup, Haxen (knuckles of pork), etc. They are open from 10 am to midnight. Is this the oldest pub in Dusseldorf? It is debated. The building was owned from 1658 to 1783 by the Pfeilsticker family. We also know that in the mid-18th century a certain Heinrich Lichtschlag ran an imperial coach station here, offering accommodation and food for travelers. Around this time, the name »Zum Heydelberger Fass« (the Heidelberg vat) appeared for the first time. The next owners of the house, a couple called Juppen, continued the business with their son, Leonhard. After his early death, the »Heidelberger Fass« or »Große Fass« was bought by Johann Lambert Gruben in 1790. When the French Revolutionary troops occupied the city in 1795, he sold the plot to Bertram Mertens, a master baker, who in turn in 1802 sold the house to grain merchant Anton Joseph Bender. Bender lived here until 1826. After his death, his widow leased the house to various landlords – we know of Heinrich Wilms and Caspar Bosselmann, who named the place »Berliner Haus. That debate still goes. The service was acceptable and the bar man friendly. An odditity with the food however, if you notice in the pictures where the silverware is placed. Creates odd male symbology. I’m not a beer drinker, but I drank their beer. I suppose, it was good even though I don’t care for beer. Restaurant Rating: 3 stars out of 5.
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Lady of the Rhine, Part 2: Chapter 5 – Exploring Dusseldorf, Games, Alcohol

Monday, 30 March 2009
Dusseldorf, Germany

Sleep was had by the explorers and they did not wake until noon. Then venturing out to the bank for conversions, found the hard way that the bank was closed from noon until 2 pm for lunch break. So Sir Christian, Princess Brea, and Sir Thomas Leaf wandered out to old town Dusseldorf for a chai tea latte at Starbucks at Sir Christian’s choosing. Escaping the beggars in the street, they sought refuge in the coffee house for a zip/and energy burst. Afterwards, Christian departed as Princess Brea and Sir Thomas Leaf set off to explore. Dropping into the K12 to visit the proprietor Sir Thomas met two years ago – and he remembered. Looking over the Goth fashions and clubwear, noticing most were “Tripp” and from Amerika. Then on to a liqour store for purchase of some absinthe for later week partying and inspiration. Hungry, the duo wandered about while Princess Brea decided what she wanted to dine on, and settled for a local brewery that only sold its one dark ale. Sir Thomas Leaf, who does not drink beer, drank one as they immediately served them even without having been ordered expecting their clientele to have come to their establishment for their famous brew.

After a day on the town, they returned to meet up with Sir Christian and Lady Vanessa at the market. Groceries at the Penny saver and then over to the Turkish market for the ingredients needed for sir Thomas to make his famous Pad Thai and Swimming Rama dishes for the party. Sir Ingo joined in the festivities and after cooking dined on the dishes. Afterwards ensued games of Bluff and Dominion(?) to the wee hours of the night. Good times. Lady Vanessa of the Rhine revealed her methodology of strategy in building towns and villages whilst controlling resources such as sheep, wheat, stone, brick, and wood.


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Absinthe (2009: in the United States)


Lucid Absinthe at V Bar

Absinthe in the United States

Also known as the “la fee verte” or “the Green Fairy”, Absinthe is a highly alcoholic and distilled beverage (roughly 45-74$ ABV). Its a strong anise-flavored spirit that is derived from herbs, including the flowers and leaves of the herb “Artemisia absinthium” commonly known as “Grande wormwood”. While most absinthe is seen as green, its also known to be black, clear, or blue. For many years, Absinthe was never treated as a “liquor” but rather an herbal tonic because it was not bottled with added sugar and is bottled at a very high proof that is normally diluted with water when drunk. It originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland. It became most popular in the late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers as it was known to instill creativity and prod the imagination. “Due in part to its association with bohemian culture, absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists and seen as a dangeroulsy addictive psychoactive drug. Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, and Aleister Crowley were all notorious bad men of that day who were (or were thought to be) devotees of the Green Fairy.[6 Wikipedia].” While all absinthe, even the U.S. mixes, have a small amount of thujone present, it was the thujone that was singled out and blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915 Absinthe was banned in the United States and most European countries except the United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, Portugal, Denmark and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Continue reading Absinthe (2009: in the United States)

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