Category Archives: travelogues

Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon

Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway

Historic Columbia River Highway
Columbia River, State of Oregon, USA

The Historic Columbia River Highway runs along the Columbia River on the Oregon side for approximately 75 miles. It is considered one of the most scenic highways in Oregon and was the first planned scenic roadway in the United States. It begins in Troutdale and ends in The Dalles as a important safe passage being built between 1913 and 1922. Points of interest are the Bridge of the Gods and Cascade Locks. Another area of special interest is where the historic highway runs through Mosier and its preserved tunnels highlighting scenic tour days. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Landmark and is designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It was replaced for logistics, speed, safety, and accessibility with the construction of the Interstate Highway 84 during the 1930’s and 1950’s, falling to be a placade of history maintained by the state of Oregon as Historic Columbia River Highway No. 100 or Route 30 as well as the “Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.” Is was modeled after the great scenic roads of Europe and the project initiated by Sam Hill (local lawyer and entrepreneur) with the assistance of engineer Samuel C. Lancaster. It was envisioned first as a tourist play route for road trips in the Model T absorbing the beauty of the Columbia River and its waterfalls. It blended in as Highway Route 30 when the U.S. Highway system was established in 1926. It was an essential route taking advantage of the lowest crossing of the Cascade Mountains that was carved by the Columbia River during the Cascades mountain uplift providing a safe and economic alternative to the previous dangerous rafting portages used by the Oregon Trail. Originally at this crossing was the Barlow Road in 1846 around the south side of Mount Hood, followed by the Sandy wagon road in the 1870s, and the railway. It was a very difficult highway to create dealing with numerous curves, grades, distance, rockfalls, avalanches, and drops. All the locations with elements of natural beauty and scenic wonder were set as control points along the route to be included.

Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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State of Washington

Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) - Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) – Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099.

Washington State

One of the largest states in the Pacific Northwest, is the State of Washington located north of Oregon, south of British Columbia, and west of Idaho. It was named after the late U.S. President George Washington. The state was created from the western part of the Washington territory which had been ceded by Britain in 1846 during the Oregon boundary disputes and became official in 1889 as part of the Union. The capital of Washington is the city of Olympia. The state often gets confused with Washington DC, and designated as such to be called Washington State or State of Washington. It is the 18th largest state in the U.S. and boasts of 71,362 square miles with over 7 million residents. 60% of that 7 million population live within the Seattle Metropolitan area. The State of Washington relies on the economies of lumber, ship building, plane building, information technology, software design, aircrafts, missiles, food production, agriculture, chemicals, metals, and machinery. The state is abundant with poderosa pine, white pine, spruce, douglas fir, hemlock, larch, and cedar. It is also a major supplier of apples, hops, pears, red raspberries, spearmint oil, sweet cherries, apricots, asparagus, dry edible peas, grapes, lentils, peppermint oil, and potatoes. It is also a major harvester of salmon, halibut, and bottomfish.

Washington has a long indigenous history, beginning with the perplexities of Kennewick Man, one of the oldest and most complete human skeletons to have been found in North America. The region that is now Washington state had many various Native American tribes residing and hunting here, notable for ornate carve canoes, masks, and totem poles. Their prodominant subsistence was on salmon fishing and/or whale hunting. In the 1770s, Euro-American settlers decimated their populations with the small pox epidemic. The first recorded European landing on its coasts was that of Spanish explorer Captain Don Bruno de Heceta in 1775 with the Santiago, a two-ship flotilla with the Sonora. He boastfully claimed all the coastal lands up to Prince WIlliam Sound for Spain under the Treaty of Tordesillas, making the Pacific a “Spanish Lake” with all its shores belonging to the Spanish Empire. In 1778, Captain James Cook made sight of Cape Flattery within the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which he had not discovered. The Straight was discovered by Charles William Barkley, captain of the Imperial Eagle in 1787. These were later first explored by Spanish explorers Manuel Quimper in 1790 and Francisco de Eliza in 1791, finalized by the exploits of George Vancouver in 1792. While the Spanish made claims of exclusivity during the British-Spanish Nootka Convention of 1790, traders and explorers from around the world infested the area. American captain Robert Gray discovered the mouth of the Columbia River naming it after his ship. Lewis and Clark made their expeditio through on October 10, 1805. The country was claimed by Great Britain via explorer David Thompson on his voyage down the Columbia while camped at the confluence of the Snake River during July 9, 1811 establishing ground for the Northwest Company’s site for a trading post. Britain and the United States shared a join occupancy of lands west of the Continental Divide to the Pacific Ocean within their Anglo-American Convention of 181, establishing the 49th parallel as the international boundary west from Lake of the Woods to the Rocky Mountains. Spain ceded their rights north the 42nd Parallel to the United States. Negotiations had a rough history between the U.S. and England, disputes were highly contested, lasting for several decades. American settlers poured into the region pushing much of the British out naturally. Britain eventually ceded all claims to lands couth of the 49th parallel to the United States during the Oregon Treaty on June 15, 1846. In 1836 the region was affected by groups of missionaries establishing several missions such as Marcus Whitman’s Waiilatpu settlement in southeastern Washington state near Walla Walla that helped the Oregon Trail for thousands of emigrants to cross over. Whitman acted as a Medicine Man for the settlers and the Native Americans, until the Native Americans fell ill to many European based diseases that Whitman couldn’t stop, and he was held personally accountable for. Tribes murdered him and 12 other settlers during the Whitman massacre of 1847 causing the Cayuse War between settlers and Indians.

Washington is hoe to several active and/or dormant volcanoes which are Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Adams. Mount Rainier is the tallest mountain in the state. The Olympic Mountains are far west in Washington on the Olympic Peninsula hosting a temperate rainforest. Most of the state possesses a marine west coast climate with mild temperatures and wet winters, autumns and springs, and relatively dry summers. Eastern Washington however is relatively dry and has large areas of semi-arid steppes and arid deserts.

Cities:

Activities/Attractions/Events:

Lodging:

Roads:


  • Interstate 84
  • Washington State Road 14

    Gig Harbor, Washington ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28461); Exploring the Olympic Peninsula. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 24, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
    Gig Harbor, Washington ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28461); Exploring the Olympic Peninsula. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 24, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Pagosa Springs, Colorado

Pagosa Springs, Colorado

Come back soon. Article expected to be published by February 20, 2017.

Pagosa Springs, Colorado ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=30437, Southwest Colorado, USA. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken February 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Wolf Creek, Colorado

Wolf Creek, Colorado

Come back soon. Article expected to be published by February 20, 2017.

Wolf Creek, Colorado ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=30441) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken February 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Rodeway Inn, Alamosa, Colorado

Rodeway Inn, Alamosa, Colorado

Come back soon. Article expected to be published by February 20, 2017.

Rodeway Inn, Alamosa, Colorado ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=30445); New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken February 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado

Mesa Verde National Park

Mesa Verde National Park
https://www.nps.gov/meve/index.htm

Article currently being written. Expected publication date 2/16/17. Come back soon.

Mesa Verde National Park ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=30061) – Durango/Cortez area, Southwest Colorado, USA. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken February 11-13, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Denver SantaCon 2016

Denver SantaCon 2016

Denver SantaCon 2016
~ Begin Union Station to Black Shirt brewery via Rail to Thirsty Lion to La Boheme to Wazee Supper Club, Denver, Colorado
https://www.facebook.com/events/1284973781560458/1337087499682419/ ~

Story coming soon …

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Union Station (Denver, CO)

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station

Union Station
~ Denver, Colorado ~

Write up coming soon ….

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647), Union Station ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29651); Denver, Co – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Thirsty Lion (Denver, Co)

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Thirsty Lion

Thirsty Lion
~ Denver, Colorado ~

Write up coming soon ….

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Thirsty Lion ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29655) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Thirsty Lion ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29655) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Thirsty Lion ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29655) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Black Shirt Brewery (Denver, Co)

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Black Shirt Brewery

Black Shirt Brewery
~ Denver, Colorado ~

Write up coming soon ….

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Black Shirt Brewery ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29657) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Black Shirt Brewery ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29657) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Black Shirt Brewery ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29657) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Denver SantaCon 2016 ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29647); Black Shirt Brewery ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29657) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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7 Minute Spring (Manitou Springs, Colorado)

7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147)

Seven Minute Spring
~ Manitou Springs, Colorado ~

Article by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Research

The Seven Minute Spring was man-made and drilled in 1909 near the former Manitou House Hotel. The drilling hit a limestone cavity of ancient carbonated waters that created a geyser that would erupt every 7 minutes giving label to its current name. In 1920 the spring was owned by a curios and concessions that tried to cash in on it promoting “Mansions 7 Minute Spring” enclosed by a run-down shack. By the 1930’s new owners gave it a more rustic appearance by fencing it in with a rectangular log structure, although commercialized with trinkets, gifts, and curios as well as a miniature railroad that circled the property. By the 1940s, the property fell into disrepair, and saw a history of various attempts to restore the spring. It was turned into 7 Minute Spring Park by 1993. Local artisans Don Green, Maxine Green, and Bill Burgess created the fonts at the spring, the Pavillion, and tourist attraction for the site. The current gazebo is stylized to incorporate the design of the original 1880’s structure that once sheltered Ute Iron Spring, featuring an outdoor amphitheater, sculpture garden, and encasing the panoramic view of the mountains. The fonts for the spring was created by Bill Burgess, Don Green, and Maxine Green. The font through which visitors could fill up water bottles was designed by Don Green and is located within the building. Maxine Green designed the ceramic components of the two font designs.

    Mineral   Amount
    Alkalinity   1,310 mg/L
    Calcium   303 mg/L
    Chloride   96.4 mg/L
    Copper  
    Fluoride   .64 mg/L
    Iron   .54 mg/L
    Lithium   .277 mg/L
    Magnesium   82.6 mg/L
    Manganese  
    Potassium   19.5 mg/L
    Silica   22 mg/L
    Sodium   159 mg/L
    Sulfate   96.7 mg/L
    Zinc   .34 mg/L
    Total Dissolved Solids   1,560 mg/L

    Mineral spring comparison chart

The little touristy village of Manitou Springs is most famous for its mineral springs that well up through eight (previously 10, upwards of 50) fonts peppered throughout the town. These springs are free to visit and each holds its own variation of minerals, magic, folklore, and healing properties that visitors sought throughout the ages. Each has its unique flavor, natural carbonation, and effervescence. This valley was originally heavily frequented by various Native American tribes who visited fountain creek and its natural springs for its healing magic, offering homage and great respect to the spiritual powers that dwell here. They believed these magical springs were the gift of the Great Spirit Manitou, after which the town and valley was named from. They brought their sick here for healing. The aboriginal inhabitants and visitors of the area called the “Great Spirit” as “Manitou”, and felt these mineral springs was its breath, as the source of the bubbles in the spring water. This made the waters and grounds extremely sacred. The Ute, Arapaho, Cheyenne, and many other tribes came here to partake of the great spirit’s breath. They would heal their sick here, collect the waters, stay for winters, and share in the waters as a area of peace where no conflict was allowed. There was believed to have been 10 natural springs in the valley. The Euro-Americans caused conflicts and skirmishes with the Natives, pushing them out, so they could utilize the valley for business, resort, tourism, and commerce. It is said, after the Natives left, they cursed the area for the Whites that no business will ever succeed there. Ever since it has been an ever-changing valley with businesses coming and going, failing and closing, with new ones coming in and replacing those that left. One of the first white explorers to record the waters was Stephen Harriman Long in 1820. The expedition’s botanist and geologist Edwin James recorded in detail the healing nature of the waters. The explorer George Frederick Ruxton wrote in his travel about these “boiling waters” as well and that “… the basin of the spring was filled with beads and wampum, pieces of red cloth and knives, while the surrounding trees were hung with strips of deer skin, cloth, and moccosons”. This is a common practice to leave such similar objects, items, and cultural artifacts around the world at magical and healing springs, wells, and bodies of water.

Nearly 50 years later, Dr. William Abraham Bell and General William Jackson Palmer made plans to develop a health resort here during the Civil War with “a vision of dreamy summer villas nestled in the mountains with grand hotels and landscaped parks clustered around the springs” that they called “Fountain Colony” and “La Font”. It became Colorado’s first resort town. By 1871 white settlers came in and began developing the area for tourism, health care, and profit. A resort was soon developed here taking advantage of the waters and incorporating them into medicinal and healing water therapies. This brought great prosperity to the region. By 1873, a developer by the name of Henry McAllister who worked for Palmer, spread news about the medicinal benefits of the Springs and pushed for it to become a spa resort including “incomparable climate and scenery” as its backdrop.

Then came various medicinal practitioners, such as Doctor Edwin Solly who pushed the area as a resort for healing and therapy, preaching the combined waters to drink, soak in, and breath of the pure air mixed with the sunny climate would be the most effective prescription to treat tuberculosis. The commercial businesses began to lay claim to the various springs, enclosing some of them as the village grew. The first of which was the Cheyenne Spring House was established as a red sandstone bricked conical roofed structure. Over 50 wells and springs were drilled shortly after, many of which were enclosed. Once popularity disappeared and “dried up”, many of these springs were capped, paved over, and closed. However as the fad died, medical centers and hospitals around the United States improved, Manitou became forgotten and suffered abandonment. The Mineral Springs Foundation was formed in 1987 as an all-volunteer 501(c)3 non-profit to protect, improve, maintain, and manage the springs targeting to restore some of the springs and promote the popularity once again. They host walking tours called “Springabouts” every Saturday from Memorial Day to Labor Day, beginning in downtown, and can be arranged by visited the Tourist center or calling 719-685-5089. The visitor center will provide maps, brochures, detailed content charts, and sampling cups upon request. They can also be found at their website at http://www.manitoumineralsprings.org. The series of springs has been developed as a National Register of Historic Places district and is located in one of the country’s largest districts of its kind. It was originally called the “Saratoga of the West” and established as a resort community within a spectacular setting at the edge of the Rocky Mountains along the base of Pikes Peak. Numerous bottling companies moved into the are making profit on the waters, the most famous of which was “Manitou Springs water” and was sold globally.

Geology: The waters come from two original sources in the Rampart Range and Ute Pass, these “deep seated waters” travel through limestone caverns and drainage systems created by karst aquifers. The water dissolves the limestone and absorbs carbonic acid, carbon dioxide, and other minerals that make it “effervescent” or slightly naturally carbonated. It is heated by volcanic and inner core processes. Through time, the waters return to the surface naturally by means of an artesian process rising to the surface, collecting soda, minerals, and sodium bicarbonate upwards. The other source of the waters is from Fountain Creek and Williams Canyon, snow melt, rainwater, and surface waters. The warm water then flows up into a limestone cavern where it becomes carbonated and springs forth to the surface in natural as well as human drilled locations. Most of these waters take thousands of years to complete its voyage from the mountain snow-capped peaks down to inner earth and back up to the surface – freeing its content and solutions from being affected by industry, development, and atmospheric contamination.

    The Springs of Manitou:
    http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3203

  1. Cheyenne Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4921 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3133
    This natural sweet soda spring comes up from limestone aquifers and is believed to be over 20,000 years old.
  2. Iron Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3159
    The Iron spring is named after its harsh foul iron-tasting flavor and content. It was a man-made spring drilled in the 1800’s and prescribed to patients for iron deficiency.
  3. Lithia / Twin Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4881 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3163
    This is a combined location of two man-made drilled springs – Twin Springs and Lithia Springs. It is popular for its Lithium content and its sweet taste, calcium, lithium, and potassium content. Its popular to be mixed in lemonade.
  4. Navajo Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3127
    This spring is a natural soda spring over which commercial development was built. It is now within and beneath the popcorn and candy store. This was the most popular that was frequented by Native Americans and early Euro-American settlers and was the founding spring for the village. It originally fed a large bath house and bottling plant bringing fame to the town.
  5. Old Ute Chief Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3169
  6. Seven Minute Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147
    A man-made spring drilled in 1909 to enhance the neighboring hotel’s tourist attraction. Its unique carbonization caused it to erupt like a geyser every 7 minutes. It became dormant for many years until the 1990’s when it was re-drilled and the surrounding park was established.
  7. Shoshone Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3151
    This was a natural spring that hosted sulphur content and was prescribed by various physicians for curative powers before modern medicine became popular and effective.
  8. Soda Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3217
  9. Stratton Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4931 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3139
    This is a man-made drilled spring by the Stratton Foundation as a service to Manitou Springs village where tourists could come and partake of its waters, dedicated to early Native American Trails.
  10. Wheeler Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3155
    This is another man-made drilled spring that was donated to the city by settler Jerome Wheeler of the New York Macy’s who resided and banked in the town during the mining and railroad period. His former home is located where the current post office is today.

7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

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Marilyn’s Pizza Parlor

Marilyn's Pizza (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29417&); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Marilyn’s Pizza (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29417&)

Marilyn’s Pizza
~ 964 Manitou Ave, Manitou Springs, CO 80829 ~

A great little hole-in-the-wall restaurant and pizza parlor in the heart of Manitou Springs downtown next to the former Ancient Mariner and the Mate Factory. Friendly service and timely pizza with a variety of choices. We had the basic slice and a macaroni and cheese slice. Good eats. Rating 3 stars out of 5

Marilyn's Pizza (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29417&); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Marilyn’s Pizza (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29417&); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

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Miramont Castle (Manitou Springs)

Miramount Castle (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29421&preview=true); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Miramont Castle (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29421)

Miramont Castle
~ 9 Capitol Hill Avenue Manitou Springs Colorado 80829 USA – miramontcastle@yahoo.com – http://www.miramontcastle.org/ ~

An oddity overlooking the village of Manitou Springs, Miramont castle is a manor house, museum, and tea room that was originally built in 1895. It was the private manor house for french born Catholic priest Father Jean Baptist Francolon. He later donated his home to the Sisters of Mercy for use as a sanitarium for those seeking healing from the magical waters of Manitou’s springs. The Sisters of Mercy set up the sanitarium in 1895 as a house to heal tuberculosis. They expanded the building in 1896 to take care of additional patients. The sisters were known for their motherly care, cleanliness, and excellence. They not only cared for patients, but contributed to the town’s culture, offering piano, violin, mandolin, guitar, and banjo lessons for the towns folk. The castle fell vacant from 1900 to 1904. The Sisters were urged by Dr. Geierman to purchase the castle for use with workings and healings achieved by German priest Sebatian Kneipp who initiated a water therapy system involving drinking prodigious quantities of Manitou’s healing waters as well as bathing in them several times a day. The Castle experienced a devastating fire in 1907 caused by an electrical fire, destroying part of the Montcalme sanitarium. Patients were relocated to the Castle for the next 20 years. In 1928 the Castle and sanitarium experienced financial difficulties so the sanitarium was converted to a boarding house for the wealthy and tourists, retreat for clergy, and eventually closed. It remained empty until privately purchased in 1946. The castle has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977 and has achieved national landmark status. Built by Father Jean Baptiste Francolon in 1895 with an eclectic style blending various architectural styles from Byzantine to Tudor styles. It today stands as a great example of Victorian Era design. The museum is fully accessible for tours and events. There is a climbing staircase as well as two chairlifts within. The castle is rumored to be haunted with numerous ghosts and poltergeists. Visitors can view all 42 furnished rooms, the gardens, and the tea room. Rated 5 stars out of 5

Miramount Castle (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29421&preview=true); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Miramount Castle (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29421&preview=true); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

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White Eagle Hotel and Pub, Portland, Oregon

White Eagle Hotel and Pub:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan,  and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
White Eagle Hotel and Pub: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907.

White Eagle Hotel and Pub
~ 836 N Russell St, Portland, OR 97227
Phone: (503) 282-6810 ~

Another McMannamin’s favorite tourist destinations, the White Eagle is more of a hostel than it is a hotel. It is located in one of the micro-brewery destination neighborhoods of Portland, Eliot in North Portland with a style of a hotel in glamour of rock n’ roll themed lodging and saloon. The building dates back to 1905. The basic rooms are located above the pub and individually furnished, has free wi-fi, and wash basins. Some rooms have bun beds. There is no air conditioning and the bathrooms are shared between rooms. The bar has a artsy feel, with rock-n-roll and odd sideshow decor, with a beer garden and nightly live music. The establishment lacks in parking, although it has a very small lot. While we have yet had a chance to lodge in this hotel, we did eat and drink at the pub in the beer garden. Service was friendly, albeit moderate in speed. It was overall a good experience. Rating: 3 stars out of 5

White Eagle Hotel and Pub:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
White Eagle Hotel and Pub: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25907. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Multnomah Falls

072413-129

Multnomah Falls
* Columbia River, Oregon *

A spectacular panoramic waterfall along the Columbia River Gorge on the Oregon side, just east of Troutdale. It drops in two steps split into a upper falls plunging 542 feet, and a smaller bottom level with a 69 foot drop. It is Oregon’s tallest waterfall, and the second tallest year-round waterfall in the United States. It is fed from underground springs coming from the Larch Mountain, augmented by spring runoff. The park is free and ample parking is shared by east and westbound travelling along the Columbia river corridor. A must stop for anyone travelling in the area. Great rest stop as well with restaurant, cafe, gift shop, and restrooms. A highly popular tourist stopoff.

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Seip Mound, Ohio

Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939).

Seip Earthworks
~ Chillicothe, Ohio ~

About fourteen miles away from Chillicothe, Ohio as part of the Hopewell Mound Complex as a large earthen work complex that has a low embankment forming a small circle and an irregular circle next to a square that make up a 121 acre site. Within this enclosure is a large elliptical mound and three smaller conjoined mounds, as well as several smaller mounds, and several structure outlines found within the excavations. The larger mound was originally 240 feet long, 160 feet wide, and 30 feet high. Visiting this site, you’ll see a portion of the reconstructed wall, a reconstructed mound, and a part of the original wall. Public parking is located at the front of the site, there is a porta-toilet, and picnic shelter with information signs located throughout the site. The site is open during daylight hours and is free.

This mound is considered one of the largest of the Hopewell Culture mounds in Ohio dating from 100 BCE to about 500 CE. It was built by Native Americans pre-contact. There is estimated that there was over 10,000 feet of embankment walls that once stood 10 feet in height. The site was originally excavated between 1925 and 1928 by the Ohio History Connection discovering a large variety of artifacts crafted from an assortment of exotic raw materials like copper and mica. The Mound is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is owned by the National Park Service.

Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder – New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Rock Creek Farm Corn Maze, Denver, CO

Rock Creek Farm Corn Maze ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28063) - Halloween Fun 2016 - Sir Thomas and the Prince, Denver, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken October 30, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Rock Creek Farm Corn Maze

Rock Creek Farm Corn Maze
~ 2005 S US Highway 287,
Broomfield, Colorado ~ (303) 465-9565 ~ https://www.facebook.com/RockCreekFarm/ ~

This year, for Halloween fun, we joined together with some close friends and high tailed it to the Rock Creek Farm for their miles of corn mazes to explore. It was my son’s first experience tromping around such custom-styled, aerial view famed mazes such as these. Rock Creek has hundreds of acres of pumpkin patches and corn fields ready to explore and enjoy for the Fall holidays. The U-Pick-Em pumpking fields are great places to get your festivity decor and pumpkins. They have a petting farm with pigs, ponies, goats, donkeys, chickens, and other farm animals. They have bouncy houses and inflatable slides, rolling balls, and other games to partake in. Many activities are free, others were a bit pricey. They did put a lot of work into creating these fields. We had a great time. Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5

Rock Creek Farm Corn Maze ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28063) - Halloween Fun 2016 - Sir Thomas and the Prince, Denver, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken October 30, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Rock Creek Farm Corn Maze ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28063) – Halloween Fun 2016 – Sir Thomas and the Prince, Denver, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken October 30, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Trick or Treat Main Street Parker, Colorado 2016

Trick or Treating Main Street Parker, Colorado (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28095). New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken October 31, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Trick or Treating Main Street Parker

Trick or Treating Celebration
~ Parker, Colorado ~

Each year, downtown Parker Colorado puts on a street block event along mainstreet closing off the streets for vendors and local businesses to hand out trick-or-treating treats and candies from their booths to the local kids and attendees of the fest. They have a mini-corn maze, performers, actors, music, and information/goods from the businesses in the area. Its a free event with a great attendance. My son came home with a bucket load of treats. Good times and a nice scenic downtown sector. This year (2016) was held on Halloween itself (10/31/16). Rating: 3 stars out of 5

Trick or Treating Main Street Parker, Colorado (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28095). New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken October 31, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Trick or Treating Main Street Parker, Colorado (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28095). New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken October 31, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Denver Museum of Natural History

Free day at the Denver Museum of Natural History (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28273); New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 5, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Free day at the Denver Museum of Natural History

– Denver Museum of Natural History and Science –
Denver, Colorado

One of Denver’s star attractions, the Museum of Nature and Science is a hallmark of the area, and an informal science education center for the Rocky Mountains. It hosts a variety of exhibits, programs, and activities for visitors to embark and learn from about the history of the Earth, the world, and most specifically Colorado. The building is roughly 716,000 square feet housing more than a million objects in its collections covering anthropology, archaeology, paleontology, geology, art, and the universe. It is also a repository for an incredible archives and library. The museum is independent and a non-profit with over 350 full time and part time staff, over 1800 volunteers, and a board of trustees with 25 member. It is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and is a affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. There are six main areas in the museum – (1) The Exhibitions, (2) IMAX films, (3) lectures, (4) classes, and (5) programs based around anthropology, geology, health science, paleontology, space science, and zoology. They receive well over 300,000 students and teachers every year just in school groups alone.

The museum spread from the Edwin Carter Log Cabin Naturalist Museum in 1875 that was the private fauna collection of Colorado species gathered together by Edwin Carter from Breckenridge Colorado. In 1892 a group of Denver citizens declared interest in his collection to be moved to the capital for all to enjoy, and Carter sold it to them for $10,000. They added another collection of butterflies and moths as well a some crystallized gold. This combined collection became the Colorado Museum of Natural History and was incorporated in 1900. The Museum finally opened in 1908. By 1918 it opened another wing. In 1927 one of its teams discovered two stone projectile points embedded in extinct species of Bison in Folsom, New Mexico putting the museum in the spotlight.

There are several permanent areas of the museum, these are:

  • Discovery Zone – a hands on educational center for kids allowing them to build, learn about water, make crafts, and excavate dinosaur bones.
  • Egyptian Mummies – an exhibit with two mummies and their associated artifacts, depicting life in Ancient Egypt and an introduction to their belief systems.
  • Expedition Health – teaches museum patrons about the human body and the science of taste.
  • Gems and Minerals – welcomes visitors into a cavern of gems and minerals, both local and globally.
  • Native American Indian Cultures – an exhibit exploring the original inhabitants of North America.
  • Prehistoric Journey – a journey into paleontology with fossil collections and skeletons of great magnitude.
  • Space Odyssey – a collection and exhibit about space, exploration, and the universe.
  • Wildlife Exhibits – animal dioranams showing scenes of life of various animals on the planet, focused on Colorado as well as globally.

The museum also houses a large 50,000 plus object collection of anthropological, archaeological, and ethnological artifacts from North America. They also house over 800 items from an ethnological art collection, archival photographs, and documents. The Earth Sciences Collection contains six main groups of fauna, flora, and mineral components such as vertebrate paleontology, paleobotany, invertebrate paleontology, minerals, meteorites, and micromount. The Health Sciences Collection has rare an unique human anatomy specimens as well as pieces of medical importance. The Space Sciences Lab houses the museums Scientific Instruments Collection.
the Department of Space Sciences maintains a large digital collection of images and multimedia assets for space. The Zoology Collection houses over 900,000 specimens of species and creatures from around the globe. The
Bailey Library and Archives focuses on anthropology, archaeology, earth sciences, health sciences, space sciences, zoology, the Rocky Mountain West, and museum studies with over 53,000 publications, 2,500 rare books, and 9,000 volumes of scientific periodicals. Various temporary exhibits come in for a wide variation of subjects and collections. The Phipps IMAX Theater was built in 1940 originally used for concerts, films, and lectures. Then it was re-opened in 1983 as an IMAX Theater primarily.

The museum actually has various secrets as there are hidden paintings located throughout the museum such as Kent Pendleton, one of the diorama painters, placed eight elves hidden in his art for visitors to find, as well as some Star Wars related pictures by the IMAX lobby. Rated 5 stars out of 5

Free day at the Denver Museum of Natural History (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28273); New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 5, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Free day at the Denver Museum of Natural History (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28273); New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 5, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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2016 Vinotok Fall Festival (Crested Butte, Colorado)

Vinotok Fall Equinox Festival ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27751) - New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken September 24, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Vinotok Fall Equinox Festival ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27751)

Vinotok Festival”
Middle/Late September Annually
Crested Butte, Colorado
https://www.facebook.com/Vinotok-112218345485150/

Annually around the Fall Equino or after, there is held a major free Fall Festival held by the small town of Crested Butte, Colorado in the heart of their downtown. Activities and festivities are actually held week long, with the cusp and end being the big public procession, trial, theater, and burning of the Grump – a huge bonfire held just at the end of Main Street. This year, 2016 marked its 31st year – and it was a spectacle to enjoy and be part of. Annually this multi-cultural grassroots celebration of the Crested Butte community spirit gathering, celebrating the vital energy and harvest of Crested Butte founders, citizens, and elders who settled the valley, mining and farming, homesteading and ranchers for the bounty and gifts they’ve enjoyed in their history. With a Indo-European Wicker Man harvest festival twist, the spirit of the land and valley is celebrated. Rites and rituals, feasts and events are held, with the final Saturday night involving magical Maidens and Lads led by the Green Men and Harvest mothers into the streets, mumming into each restaurant and bar, luring out the patrons into the streets for the grand trial of the Grump – a large wicker man who is processioned down the streets to the bonfire circle where he is banished and burnt with other effigies into the night – dancing, drumming, and chanting. Everyone pouring in their grumps for the magic to be actualized.

The event is free except for the feast on Friday night. Free camping options available on forestry and BLM land a short drive away.

Vinotok Fall Equinox Festival ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27751) - New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken September 24, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Vinotok Fall Equinox Festival ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27751) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken September 24, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Interstate 84

Interstate 84

Oregon, Idaho, and Utah

This interstate highway follows the Columbia River and is located across the river from State Highway 14 in Washington along the old Oregon Trail. It has become a replacement for the Historic Columbia River Highway (or Highway Route 30) in Oregon. It operates in two non-contiguous sections, the first of which runs from Portland, Oregon to the I-80 junction at Echo, Utah. The section running through Oregon state is also known as the “Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway”. In Portland, Oregon it is also known as the “Banfield Freeway” or “the Banfield”.

Some highlights along this route are: Bridge of the Gods

Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady  , and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken June 6, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan,   Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Bridge of the Gods, Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady , and Prince Cian. Adventures in Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken June 6, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Mount Adams, Washington

040815-001
Mt. Adams, Trout Lake, Washington

Mount Adams

Story and article coming soon. Check back again. Meanwhile, enjoy the photo gallery.

Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 19, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 19, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Soap Lake, Washington

Soap Lake ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25717), Washington. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 29, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Soap Lake ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25717), Washington.

Soap Lake, Washington
~ 47°23′18″N 119°29′15″W (47.388341, -119.487611) ~

Both a small town and a natural phenomena of a magical healing lake, “Soap Lake” was called “Smokiam” by the Native Americans as “Healing Waters”. It is a soft mineral lake in between Ephrata and Coulee. It is located in Grant County Washington. The abundant mineral within the waters is what is referred to as “washing soda” giving it a suds-like, slippery film feel. The minerals are alkaline which kills most bacteria it comes in contact with without damaging the animal or human the bacteria is living on, and when the tissues repairs itself the massive layers and deposits of mineralization will occur. The lake is very popular as a healing cure for Burgeger and Reynaud’s disease because it opens the capillary and extremity circulation of those affected by it. There are over 20 alkaline mineral salts found in Soap Lake, and is why many gather mud from the bottom of the lake to spread across their bodies for its natural healing effect. The mud sucks out toxins, moisture, and oils from the skin, giving it ability to heal. Combined with sunshine from the desert, it has been known to control psoriasis. The minerals found in Soap Lake are Sodium, Bicarbonate, Sulfate, Carbonate, Chloride, Potassium, Organic Nitrogen, Fluoride, Ortho-Phosphate, Nitrate, Calcium, Magnesium, and less than .01 percent of Iron, Aluminum, Copper, Rubidium, Lithium, Strontium, Barium, Chromium, Lead, Manganese, Titanium, Vanadium, and Boron. The waters have been rumored to cause relief with rheumatoid arthritis, beurgers disease, eczema, psoriasis, raynaud’s syndrom, and paralysis.

This lake is one of its only kinds in the world, and no other lake has been found as such in the world. It drew large crowds of visitors back in the 1920’s. The U.S. military sent young men to Soap Lake to help arrest symptoms of the debilitating disease known as Buergers Disease. Some bathe in hot baths using the water at 104 degrees Fahrenheit for 20-30 minutes, once a day. For capillary dilation, others take 108 degree fahrenheit hot baths for 20 minutes a day. Others just swim in the lake for their skin. Others use the mud combined with the sun for sun tanning while others take mud baths. There are some that even believe in drinking it, but never taking more than 2 ounces four times daily. This however is not recommended. The first layer of the lake has approximately 81 feet of mineral water, the second level is mud-like and consists of a stronger mineral composition with concentrations of unusual substances and microbes. It has been stated that these layers have not mixed for thousands of years, creating the rare condition called meromictic. There are only 11 meromictic lakes in the U.S.

The town has just over 1,500 residents (2010 census). Through the years it has become a busy resort and health spa, had grown to four hotels and various rooming houses making the waters known. It also became a touristy social center with celebrations, festivals, socials, and gatherings held often. This ended around the Depression as a drought hit the lake, dwindling the tourist trade and visitors. When the Grand Coulee Dam was built, new irrigation canals were built, and brought life back into the area. From the 1900’s to the 1940’s, numerous sanitariums were built on the shores to help attract and cure visitors.

Soap Lake ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25717); Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 22, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Soap Lake ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25717); Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 22, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Twilight Tour, Forks, Washington

Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington

Twilight Self-Guided Tour, Forks, Washington

Located on the outskirts of the Olympic National Forest, is the small lumber town of Forks, Washington. This town would not be so popular as it is today had it not been used as the actual setting for the Hollywood famed thriller “Twilight” movie series as well as their inspired saga novels they are based on. Because of the films and books, fans from far and wide travel to this town to see where the characters lived, roamed, and had their supernatural events. So popular there is a paid tour fans can go on, or for the budget conscious, to head off to the visitor center for a free self-guided tour brochure. The novels were written by author Stephanie Meyer who wrote about them using the city of Forks as her inspiration. The town hosts an annual celebration honoring the author here the 2nd week of September every year. Map and self-guided tour can be found here: http://forkswa.com/twilight/. For a non-fan like myself, it was a bit boring and un-inspiring, but to the fans, they seem to have fun. Rating: 2 stars out of 5

Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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La Push, Washington

La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119), Washington

La Push, Washington

Tribal lands outside of Olympic National Forest not far from Forks, and part setting / inspiration from Stephanie Meyers series “Twilight” it is a location off the path from the Twilight Tour in Forks. Only 14 miles towards the coast from Forks, this is the home of the Quileute Tribe who originally habitated these lands for their sea-faring quests and fishing trips. It was here they traditionally built their cedar canoes for oceanic journeys, whaling, and seal hunting. La Push is their current headquarters. They signed their first treaty with the Euro-American settlers here that eventually relocated them to a reservation in Taholah, but because of their remoteness, wasn’t enforced, and many stayed in this area. In 1889 President Grover Cleveland established a one mile square reservation here for them, with about 252 inhabitants. That same year, the town was destroyed by arson. Today it is a popular tourist destination and is home to oceanfront resorts, a fish hatchery, a seafoo company and a marina. They host an annual festival called Quileute Days every July 17-19th celebrating their cultural heritage, with fireworks, salmon bake, dancing, songs, softball and other tournaments, vending, and food. They are featured as characters in Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series as the wolf people. The unincorporated community sits at the mouth of the Quileute River in Clallam County Washington on the Olympic Peninsula. Its known for its whale watching and beaches. The name “La Push” comes from the Fench “La Bouche” meaning “The Mouth” referring to the mouth of the Quillayute River adapted by the local language. The climate is very wet oceanic with strong influences from the Pacific Ocean and very mild winters. It is an incredibly lush rainfall location.

La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) – Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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First Beach, La Push, Washington

First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) - La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) – La Push – Forks, Washington

First Beach, La Push, Washington

Tribal lands outside of Olympic National Forest not far from Forks, and part setting / inspiration from Stephanie Meyers series “Twilight” it is a location off the path from the Twilight Tour in Forks. Only 14 miles towards the coast from Forks, this is the home of the Quileute Tribe who originally habitated these lands for their sea-faring quests and fishing trips. It was here they traditionally built their cedar canoes for oceanic journeys, whaling, and seal hunting. La Push is their current headquarters. They signed their first treaty with the Euro-American settlers here that eventually relocated them to a reservation in Taholah, but because of their remoteness, wasn’t enforced, and many stayed in this area. In 1889 President Grover Cleveland established a one mile square reservation here for them, with about 252 inhabitants. That same year, the town was destroyed by arson. Today it is a popular tourist destination and is home to oceanfront resorts, a fish hatchery, a seafoo company and a marina. They host an annual festival called Quileute Days every July 17-19th celebrating their cultural heritage, with fireworks, salmon bake, dancing, songs, softball and other tournaments, vending, and food. They are featured as characters in Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series as the wolf people.

First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) - La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) – La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) – Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Husum, Washington

1/20/16: Husum, Washington (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039). Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge:  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 -   Photos from  February 2016 . (c) 2016 - photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Eadaoin Bineid / Leaf McGowan and/or Etain DeDanann of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).

1/20/16: Husum, Washington (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039). Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 – Photos from February 2016 . (c) 2016 – photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Eadaoin Bineid / Leaf McGowan and/or Etain DeDanann of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).

Husum, Washington

Located along the White Salmon River, this little village community is based on tourism specifically kayaking and water sports. It is most famous for its 10′ vertical drop waterfall used by rafts and kayaks as a class V waterfall known as “Husum Falls” under the bridge in the center of the village. The village has some whitewater rafting outfitters, restaurants, school, and a post office. The village is at 45-47-57-N-121-29-13-W in Klickitat County, Washington properly served within White Salmon as an unincorporated community, In between White Salmon and BZ Corner. Area code 509 with a postal zip code of 98623.

The village is along the old wagon route that connected the Sandborn road to the town of Hussum, originally named as the weldon-hyndman road by the petition of the builders. Elwin Weldon and Henry Hyndman, prior to construction of this wagon road. The people of the Sandborn area used sleds to haul their products the 3 miles to and from husum. The pioneers expected “the building of this road to result in the development of a big section of the county.

1/20/16: Husum, Washington (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039). Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge:  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 -   Photos from  February 2016 . (c) 2016 - photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Eadaoin Bineid / Leaf McGowan and/or Etain DeDanann of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).

1/20/16: Husum, Washington (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039). Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 – Photos from February 2016 . (c) 2016 – photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Eadaoin Bineid / Leaf McGowan and/or Etain DeDanann of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).

References:

A2ZGorge.info n.d. Husum and BZ Corner. Website referenced www.a2zgorge.info on 1/14/16.
U.S. Geological Survey n.d. Geographic Names Information System: Husum.
Wikipedia n.d Husum, Washington. The Free Encyclopedia. Website referenced 1/13/15.

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American Stonehenge (Maryhill, Washington)

American Stonehenge
Maryhill, Washington * Contact: Maryhill Museum of Art * 35 Maryhill Museum Drive * Goldendale, Washington 98620 * 509-773-3733 *
by Thomas Baurley

America has several Stonehenges – replicas of the infamous original from the British Isles. The American Stonehenge at Maryhill is one of the most popular sitting atop a lonely bluff overlooking the town of Maryhill, Washington and the length of the Columbia River. It is a full-size identical replica astronomically aligned of the ancient monument of “Stonehenge” in England. It serves as a replica for those who died in World War I and was built by the road engineer, Sam Hill from 1918-1930. It took him 12 years to perfect the monument, dedicating it on July 4, 1918 and completing it in 1929. He passed away shortly after its completion and was buried at the base of bluff below the monument in a difficult to reach location so that he’d be left alone by the tourists he expected to come see his monument. Hill originally built the monument after being mistakenly informed that the original Stonehenge was used for sacrifice. He wanted to symbolize how humanity was still being sacrificed to the God of War. His monument can be seen ominously looming on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River and easily seen by all passerby’s on U.S. Highway 97.

    The dedication plague at the monument reads:
    “In memory of the soldiers of Klickitat County who gave their lives in defense of their country. This monument is erected in the hope that others inspired by the example of their valor and their heroism may share in that love of liberty and burn with that fire of patriotism which death can alone quench.”

Sam Hill also built a mansion nearby that hosts the Maryhill Museum of Art holding monuments of the Klickitat County soldiers who died in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is also the very first monument in the United States to be constructed to honor the dead of World War I. The altar stone is aligned with the sunrise on the Summer Solstice. There is no admission to the Memorial.

American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington.  11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/  American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629 Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151
American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington. 11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629
Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151

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State of Alabama, USA

Alabama, USA. September 16, 2012: Travelling through Louisiana and Florida, USA. (c) 2012 - photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to seek permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/?tcp_product_category=photo For more information visit: Alabama: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5089 (Expected Publication November 2012) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ For travel tales, visit: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
Alabama, USA. September 16, 2012: Travelling through Louisiana and Florida, USA. (c) 2012 – photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, technogypsie.com.

Alabama, United States of America
more information: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5089

Ah the memories of Alabama. I spent many a road trip across this intriguing “Heart of Dixie” state. It is close to the heart of the Bible Belt and the root of Southeastern culture, or so most Alabamans would think. There is however quite an alternative side to the redneck infested conservative Bible-thumping W.A.S.P. visualization of Alabama that is usually depicted by those outside of Alabama’s state line. It is also called the “Yellowhammer State” after the state bird. It is also known as the Cotton State. The State tree is the Long leaf Pine, the state flower is the Camellia, the capital is Montgomery, the largest city is Birmingham, and the oldest city is Mobile. To the north is Tennessee, to the East is Georgia and Florida, Mississippi to the West, and the Gulf of Mexico to the South. It is the 30th largest land-mass state with the 23rd largest population in the U.S.A. Alabama also has one of the longest navigable inland waterways in the States measuring approximately 1,300 miles. Alabama culture takes a lot of influence from the days of the Civil War, after which suffered extreme economic hardships until World War II. Poverty and lack of support for its agricultural production from 1901 to the 1960’s really affected the region. Exclusion of minorities in voting suffered the state until changes were made in the 1980s. After WWII the economic growth increased from agriculture to diversified interests especially with expansion of numerous military bases making Alabama more industrial. Economy began to focus on management, finance, aerospace, automotive, manufacture, mineral extraction, healthcare, education, retail, and tech.

Ancestry/Ethnicity/Cultural:
Alabama was a pivotal location from Gulf coast indigenous tribes until European settlers migrated to the area. Alabama in a Western sense was first founded by French colonies. Today, Alabama is primarily 67% White, 5.4% Hispanic, 26.2% African American, 1.1% Asian, .6% American Indian, .1% Native Hawaiian/Islander, 2% Other Race, and 1.5% from Two or more races according to 2011 Census statistics. Ancestry roots have been estimated at 26.2% African American, 23.6% English, 7.7% Irish, 5.7% German, and 2% Scots-Irish, though in reality most of the White Western influence is from British ancestry, though demographers claim this is only 20-23% in reality albeit Alabama whites identify with English Ancestry when asked (41%) and demographers claim most of those have Scots-Irish origins being more predominant than reported by themselves. Of the Scots-Irish, most were likely Protestant Scots-Irish coming from Northern Ireland as being the largest non-English immigrant group coming from the British Isles before the American Revolution. By 1984 the Davis-Strong Act was established creating the Alabama Indian Affairs Commission to help protect from discrimination, racial segregation, and to create respect – after a long history of being lumped into the binary categorization as “black” in the Alabama black-and-white world. There are Nine Civilized Tribes of the American Southeast – the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, MOWA Band of Choctaw Indians, Star Clan of Muscogee Creeks, Ehota Cherokee Tribe of Alabama, Cherokee Tribe of Northeast Alabama, and the Cher-O-Creek Intra Tribal Indians, Ma-Chis Lower Creek Indian Tribe, Piqua Shawnee Tribe, and the Ani-Yun-Wiya Nation. Alabama gets a bad wrap sometimes as being extremely racist and bigoted as it is still believed that there is a great suspicion of and dislike for Northerners as Southerners are considered to be more conservative and conventionally oriented that someone who looks different than the mass may be responded to with hostility whether it be race, culture, dress, or appearance. The sub-culture of rednecks, often uneducated country folk who tend to be racist, opinionated, violent, and if drunk often to attack or insult others. The KKK is still very active in Alabama. Overall Southerners are very amicable and generous, courteous and civil with great respect to elders and to help their neighbor.

Mobile, Alabama. Driving around the Gulf of Mexico.  Photos from Tuesday, 10 September 2013.  (c) 2013 - photo by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).
Mobile, Alabama. Driving around the Gulf of Mexico. Photos from Tuesday, 10 September 2013. (c) 2013 – photo by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions (www.technogypsie.com/photography/). Purchase rights and/or permissions to use can be obtained at site listed here. To follow the adventure, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/. To read reviews visit http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/.

Alternative Culture/Sites/Projects/Shops:
Contrary to popular belief, Alabama is actually quite diverse, possessing alternative culture that is often only found in the Northeast and the West Coast, has many odd wacky art sites and exhibits, and counter-culture movements even though most of these are not so apparent in the public eye. Some of the multi-cultural and sub-cultural variations in Alabama come from their major universities of Auburn and the University of Alabama.

Mobile, Alabama, USA. September 16, 2012: Travelling through Louisiana and Florida, USA. (c) 2012 - photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to seek permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/?tcp_product_category=photo For more information visit: Alabama: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5089 (Expected Publication November 2012) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ For travel tales, visit: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
Mobile, Alabama, USA. September 16, 2012: Travelling through Louisiana and Florida, USA. (c) 2012 – photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to seek permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/?tcp_product_category=photo
For more information visit:
Alabama: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5089 (Expected Publication November 2012)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/
For travel tales, visit:
http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/

Cities:
A full list of cities and towns can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_and_towns_in_Alabama

   

Climate:
Alabama is primarily a humid sub-tropical zone according to the Koppen Climate Classification and Wikipedia. It averages around 64 F (18 C) being warmer around the Gulf and cooler in the Appalachian Mountains. Summers are very hot and winters are very mild. Rain falls throughout the year keeping Alabama damp and green with average rainfall annual of 56 inches. Summer temperatures average over 90 F (32 C). Alabama is notorious for tropical storms, hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms. The number of hurricanes compare with that of Florida, and the number of tornadoes compare that with Oklahoma having their own tornado “Dixie Alley”. Snow is rare even though winter temperatures average around 40 F (4 C) in Mobile and around 32 F (0 C) in Birmingham. Alabama’s highest temperature was 112 F (44 C) recorded on September 5, 1925. The record low of ?27 F (?33 C) occurred on January 30, 1966 in New Market.

Economy/Industry:
Alabama thrives from aerospace, education, health care, banking, automobile manufacture, mineral extraction, steel production and fabrication industry. Agriculture is still a lifeblood industry for the region focusing on farming, fishing, and forestry.

Mobile, Alabama, USA. September 16, 2012: Travelling through Louisiana and Florida, USA. (c) 2012 - photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to seek permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/?tcp_product_category=photo For more information visit: Alabama: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5089 (Expected Publication November 2012) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ For travel tales, visit: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
Mobile, Alabama, USA. September 16, 2012: Travelling through Louisiana and Florida, USA. (c) 2012 – photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, Thomas Baurley, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to seek permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/?tcp_product_category=photo
For more information visit:
Alabama: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5089 (Expected Publication November 2012)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/
For travel tales, visit:
http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/

Geography:
The 30th largest land-mass state in the U.S with over 52,419 square miles of terrain. 3.2% of Alabama is water and home to the second-largest inland waterway system in the USA. Alabama is bordered by Tennessee in the North, Georgia to the East, Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the South, and Mississippi to the West. Most of the state is mountainous with the Tennessee River cutting a large valley through the state, and creating numerous drainages, streams, rivers, creeks, and lakes. Alabama once had large expanses of pine forests and ranks 5th in the US for plant diversity and over 62 mammal species, 93 reptile species, 73 amphibian species, over 300 native freshwater fish species, and over 420 bird species, 83 crayfish species, and 383 mollusk species.

Geology/Landscape:A Natural Bridge rock, the longest east of the Rockies lives in Alabama. There is also a 5-mile wide meteor crater in Elmore County north of Montgomery called the Wetumpka Crater – a site of Alabama’s greatest natural disaster measuring 1000 foot wide and impacted over 80 million years ago.

History:

Alabama was a popular location for the original inhabitants of the Americas, being a threshold of activity and habitation for thousands of years before Europeans arrived on the scene. The Native Americans built enormous mounds in this area and had an incredible system of trade with tribes in the Northwest by means of the Ohio River. This trade route was accredited to the Burial Mound Period (ca. 1000 BCE – 700 CE) towards contact. The infamous “Moundville Archaeological Site” is located in Moundville, Alabama which was occupied by Indigenous peoples from the Mississippian culture from 1000 CE to 1450 CE and stood as one of the major centers for this cultural period. This is the second-largest complex of classic Middle Mississippian era civilization just after Cahokia in Illinois. Archaeological studies here influenced the characterization of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex which while sharing common attributes with Meso-American culture, was independent within its own accord, and is one of the focal points of our understanding about religion during this period. Native Americans inhabiting this area around European contact were the Alibamu, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Koasati, all of whom share common language family traits of the Muskogean language family are distinct independent cultures with their own languages, most of who are still in Alabama today.

Europeans came onto the scene during the 16th century with the Spanish being the first Europeans to arrive on these shores. Hernando de Soto’s expedition passed through Alabama, and most of his recorded activity was in the area of modern day Mobile, Alabama (earlier known as “Mabila”) in 1540. In 1702 the French founded the first European settlement in the region that was once known as “Old Mobile” which in 1711 was relocated to where present day Mobile exists today. Area was claimed by France from 1702-1763 as part of “La Louisiane”. As early as 1767 the Province of Georgia claimed most of the area we now know as “Alabama” and many labelled the area at this time as the Yazoo lands. The “Yazoo lands” were officially added to the Mississippi Territory in 1804 following what was known as the “Yazoo land scandal” where Spain kept a claim on its former Spanish West Florida Territory to what would become the coastal counties until the Adams-Onis Treaty ceded it to the U.S. in 1819. This territory lasted through the Revolutionary War as part of Georgia. During the Seven Years War, France lost the territory to the British and the region where Alabama now resides became part of British West Florida from 1763-1783 until the surrender of the Spanish Garrison at Mobile to U.S. forces occurred on April 13, 1813. One of the earliest white settlers of the area, Thomas Bassett, a British monarchy loyalist during the Revolutionary Era had settled in the Tombigbee district in the early 1770s as his place of refuge. Spanish West Florida took a lot of the eastern territory in 1783 as part of the Republic of West Florida in 1810 but by 1812 was added to the Mississippi period. When Mississippi was added as a state in 1817 the more sparsely settled eastern half of this territory was separated and called the “Alabama Territory” with St. Stephens as its territorial capital from 1817-1819.

In 1819 Congress selected Huntsville as the site for the first Constitutional Convention of Alabama just after being approved as the 22nd state, making Huntsville the temporary capital of Alabama from 1819 to 1820. In 1820 it was moved to Cahaba that became the Capital from 1820-1825. After a steady flow of settlers came to the area to set up cotton cultivation farms from the 1820s – 1830s changing population dynamics the capital moved to Tuscaloosa. Tuscaloosa was capital of Alabama from 1826-1846. Both St. Stephens and Cahaba are now ghost towns. During the 1820’s Alabama’s constitution provided for universal suffrage for white men. Southeastern traders from the Upper South brought numerous slaves into the area to work the cotton plantations expanding Alabama’s industry substantially and attracting many poor disfranchised people here who became subsistence farmers. The 1810 population of 10,000 residents increased to over 300,000 by 1830. Native Americans were completely removed from the State by passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. In 1846 the capital was moved again this time to Montgomery.

By 1860 Alabama had 964,201 residents half of which were African American slaves and only 2,690 free people of color. 1861 Alabama succeeded from the Union and remained an independent republic for a few days until it joined the Confederate States of AMerica and became heavily involved in the American Civil War contributing over 120,000 soldiers to the battle. In 1865 the 13th Amendment demanded freeing all slaves in the State and Alabama remained under military rule until May 1865. It was officially restored to the Union in 1868. From 1867-1874 white citizens were barred from voting allowing African Americans an ability to emerge as political leaders in the State. During this period there were 3 African-American congressmen: Jeremiah Haralson, Benjamin S. Turner, and James T. Rapier. Alabama’s industry continued with cotton. By 1868 the state’s first public school system was established as well as the expansion of women’s rights. Numerous insurgent resistance groups were established to try to bring down the freedmen and Republicans, some of which were notoriously known as the Ku Klux Klan, Pale Faces, Knights of the White Camellia, Red shirts, and the White League. Alabama was reconstructed in 1874 when Democrats regained control of the legislature writing another constitution in 1875 passing the Blaine Amendment prohibiting public money from being used to finance religious affiliated schools, approved racially segregated schools. In 1891 laws were passed allowing segregation in Railroad passenger cars. By the 1901 constitution severe segegration measures were incorporated disfranchising most African Americans and poor whites especially through voting registration regulations requiring poll taxes and literacy tests to vote.

In 1903 only 2,980 African Americans were registered to vote in the state compared to the 181,000 that were registered in 1900. In 1901 the constitution required segregation of public schools, and made interracial marriage illegal again. By 1911 jails were segregated, 1915 hospitals were segregated, 1928 toilets, hotesl, and restaurants were segregated and 1945 bus stop waiting rooms. Taxes from African Americans went to fund white schools leaving many African American schools in ruin. African Americans taxed themselves twice to match funds to rebuild their schools. Alabama sunk into a period of racial discrimination involving agricultural depression, lynchings, and social complexity. Cotton crops failed due to boll weevil infestations causing migrations out of the state dropping its population in half from 1910-1920. Some migrants went to Birmingham to work in new industrial jobs giving the city a new nickname as “The Magic City” and the 19th largest city in the U.S. with over 30% of the state’s population residing there. In the 1940s courts took the first steps to recognized voting rights of African Americas in the U.S. Alabama responded with its own legislature to create counter-steps to disfranchise black voters. Alabama was found to be in violation of the 15th Amendment. Industrial developments associated with world war II brought prosperity to the region increasing populations of larger cities and increasing standards of living.

From 1940-1943 over 89,000 people moved into Mobile for war-related industries. The “one man, one vote” institution of 1964 began a route of fair voting practices into inception as Alabama sought to become closer to the rest of the U.S. The Civil Rights movement had notable events in the State including the Montgomery Bus Boycott 1955-1956, Freedom Rides in 1961 and 1965 Selma to Montgomery Marches that contributed to Congressional passage and enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Acts of 1965 by U.S. Congress. Legal Segregation in the U.S. was illegal by 1964 but still was rampant in Alabama for much longer. By 1972 the legislature completed the first congressional redistricting based on the decennial census benefiting urban areas and those who were under-representated over the last 60 years assisting African American to gain equality.

Natural Parks, State Parks:
Alabama has several National Park Service properties including Horseshoe Bend National Military Park near Alexander City; Little River Canyon National Preserve near Fort Payne; Russell Cave National Monument in Bridgeport; Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site in Tuskegee; and Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site near Tuskegee. Alabama has four National Forests: Conecuh, Talladega, Tuskegee, and William B. Bankhead and is also home to the Natchez Trace Parkway, the Selma To Montgomery National Historic Trail, and the Trail Of Tears National Historic Trail as well as the notable natural wonder called “Natural Bridge” rock, the longest natural bridge east of the Rockies.

  • DeSoto Caverns (Childesburg) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22999

    Sites to See:

    • Alabama Museum of Natural History: (Tuscaloosa) features the Hodges Meteorite that had a cameo in the famous film “Fried Green Tomatoes” at the Whistle Stop Cafe. On November 30th, 1954 a large meteorite fell through the roof a a Sylacauga home striking Ann Hodges being recorded as the first known object to fall from the sky and hit a person. A legal battle occurred afterwards on who had rights to the meteorite, the Hodges family or the landlord. It has since been placed in the Natural History Museum. This meteor combined with the 1833 Leonid meteor shower became the inspiration for the song “Stars Fell on Alabama.”

    State Symbols, Mottos, Animals, Icons:

    Coming Soon.

    Please visit again soon, this research project is currently being updated and more content/photos will be added soon.

    Bibliography/References/Recommended Reading:


    • Baurley, Thomas 2015 Alabama. Technogypsie Travels and Reviews. Website referenced 8/17/15 at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alabama
    • Baurley, Thomas 2015 Alternative America Travel Guide. Technogypsie Productions, Riverside, CA.
    • Baurley, Thomas 2015 United States. Technogypsie Travels and Reviews. Website referenced 8/17/15 at http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22187.
    • Chambers, Jesse 2014 “Birmington Oddities” Websie referenced 8/17/15 at http://www.al.com/living/index.ssf/2015/04/post_238.html
    • End to End 2015 “Wacky Alabama End to End” website referenced 8/17/15 at http://www.al.com/wacky/wacky.html
    • Fuhlhage, Michael 2014 “How Hippie Hitchhikers Saw Alabama in 1973”. Website referenced on 8/17/15 at http://mjfuhlhage.net/category/alternative-culture/
    • Hubpages 2011 “10 Weird and Unusual Things to See and Do in Alabama” Website referenced 8/17/15 http://hubpages.com/hub/10-Weird-and-Unusual-Things-to-Do-in-Alabama
    • McGowan, Leaf 2015 Magical America. Technogypsie Productions, Riverside, CA.
    • Museumtoo 2015 “Six Alternative US Cultural Venues to Visit”. Website referenced 8/17/15 at http://museumtwo.blogspot.com/2010/07/six-alternative-us-cultural-venues-to.html
      Wikipedia undated United States. Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Website referenced 8/17/15 at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States.

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Texas, USA

Driving Across Texas, USA. September 13, 2012: New Mexico to Texas, USA. (c) 2012 - photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to gain permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/  For more information visit: Texas: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5023 (expected publication  November 2012) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ For travel tales, visit: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
Driving Across Texas, USA. September 13, 2012: New Mexico to Texas, USA. (c) 2012 – photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to gain permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/
For more information visit:
Texas: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5023 (expected publication November 2012)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/
For travel tales, visit:
http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/

Texas, United States of America

The “Big” State. The Lone Star State. It is what it claims, large expansive country with varied terrain, lots of pride, emphasis on large, and “the West”. I’ve had my good times and boredom here, the latter being numerous road trips waiting patiently to get from one end of the state to the other. It is the 2nd most populated and largest land mass state in the United States of America. According to the 2014 Census records, it has over 26.9 million residents. Its largest city is Houston with San Antonio as second, followed by Dallas-Fort Worth and Greater Houston area. The Capital of Texas is Austin. Texas is known as the “lone Star” state to signify that it was once a former independent republic and its struggles for independence from Mexico, as well as its constant threats to separate from the U.S. as its own country. This symbol is found on its sate flag and state seal. The word “Texas” comes from the indigenous Caddo language word for “friends”.

Ancestry/Ethnicity: Originally inhabited primarily by Indigenous Native Americans, the area saw great settlement from Westerners and Euro-Americans. Several nations once ruled over the territory of which the famous “Six Flags” theme park originating here coined its name after the six flags of these nations. Of the Western settlement, Spain was the first to claim Texas as its own, France then had a short-lived colony here, Mexico controlled the territory until 1836 when Texas won its independence becoming an independent Republic and joining the United States as the 28th state in 1845. This led to the conflicts that caused the Mexican-American War in 1846. Texas succeeded in 1861 to join the Confederate States of America, and after the Civil War, rejoined the United States.

Cities:

   

Climate: Coming Soon

Economy/Industry: Cattle, Oil, Education, High Tech, Agriculture, Petrochemicals, Energy, Computers and Electronics, Aerospace, and Bio-Medical Sciences.

Geography: Located in the south-central region of the United States of America. It borders Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico to the South, New Mexico to the West, Oklahoma to the North, Arkansas to the Northeast, and Louisiana to the East. Texas consists of approximately 268,820 square miles.

Geology/Landscape: Texas has an incredible array of Geology. Some of its more notable features are the Balcones Fault and a very diverse landscape from the American South and Southwest. 10% of Texas is desert, another 10% swamps, the remainder prairies, grasslands, forest, piney woods, rolling plains, rugged hills, mountains of the Big Bend, and coastal beaches of the Gulf of Mexico.

History: Coming Soon

Please Come Back Soon. This page is being created.

This page is in progress and updates will be frequent in the near future, please come back soon for more content and photos If you are a business or attraction that has been reviewed here and would like to add details, a re-review, or to request an update please email Technogypsie @ gmail . com (remove spaces)
This page was last updated on 8/16/2015

Driving Across Texas, USA. September 13, 2012: New Mexico to Texas, USA. (c) 2012 - photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to gain permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/  For more information visit: Texas: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5023 (expected publication  November 2012) http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/ For travel tales, visit: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
Driving Across Texas, USA. September 13, 2012: New Mexico to Texas, USA. (c) 2012 – photography by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo or to gain permission to use, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/
For more information visit:
Texas: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=5023 (expected publication November 2012)
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/
For travel tales, visit:
http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/

References:

  • Baurley, Thomas 2015 Alternative America: Travel Guide to the U.S.A. Technogypsie Publications, Riverside, California.
  • McGowan, Leaf 2015 Magical America. Technogypsie Publications, Riverside, California.
  • Wikipedia 2015 “Texas” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Website https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas referenced 8/16/15.
  • Wikipedia 2015 “United States of America” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Website https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States referenced 8/16/15.

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