Category Archives: Ohio

Ohio, USA

070513-002

Ohio, USA

The State of Ohio is central to the Midwestern states of the Great Lakes with its capital as Columbus. The state is bordered by the Ohio River in the south and the state of Kentucky, Lake Erie to the north, Pennsylvania to the East, Indiana to the West, West Virginia to the Southeast, and Michigan to the Northwest. The border with Michigan was changed due to the Toledo War to angle slightly northeast to the north shore of the Maumee River’s mouth. It is the 34th largest state in the United States as per land area, the tenth most densely populated, and the seventh most populated. The state was named after the river of the same name, which came from the Seneca tribe’s word “ohi:yo'” meaning “great river” or “good river”. It has the nickname of being the “Buckeye state” and its residents “buckeyes” after the numerous buckeye trees in the state. The state was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803.

Geologically, Ohio features glaciated till plains minus the Great Black Swamp that is a extremely flat area in the Northwest. The glaciation from the east an southeast was the Allegheny Plateau, then another belt known as the unglaciated Allegheny Plateau causing rugged hills and forests. The rest of Ohio is low relief. The ruggest southeast stretches as a bow-like arc towards the Ohio river from the West Virginia Panhandle. There are several major rivers running through Ohio such as the Cuyahoga River, Great Miami River, Maumee River, Scioto River, and Muskingum River most of which drain into the northern Atlantic Ocean through Lake Erie and St. Lawrence River. Rivers in the southern part of the state drain into the Gulf of Mexico via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. Ohio has a humid continental climate through most of the region except the extreme southern counties of the Bluegrass region that are defined as humid subtropical climate. Summers are hot and humid throughout the state with winters ranging from cool to cold. Precipitation is moderate year-round though bouts of severe weather are not uncommon such as tornados, snowstorms, rain storms, and sleet. There have been earthquakes as well through the state.

The first inhabitants of the region were nomadic Native American tribes and peoples dating to as early as 13,000 B.C.E. The early nomads disappeared from historical record by 1,000 B.C.E. From 1,000 B.C.E. to 800 B.C.E. the Adena culture dominated with semi-permanent villages with domestication of plants including sunflowers, squash, and potentially corn. The remainder was hunting and gathering moin into more settled and complex villages. The Great Serpent Mound in Adams County is one of the most superior remnants of the culture.

The Hopewell evolved from the Adena who also conducted mound-building activities creating complex, large sophisticated earthworks throughout the region. Trade became a major industry creating a large network amongst the early peoples of the region. The Hopewell vanished around 600 C.E. potentially from the rise of the Mississippian Culture Siouan-speaking people from the Plains and East Coast claim to be their ancestors living here until the 13th century C.E. It is believed that Ohio has three distinct prehistoric cultures: (1) the Fort Ancient People, (2) the Whittlesey Focus People, and (3) the Monongahela Culture. All three of these cultures disappeared by the 17th century with European contact and the diseases the Europeans brought with them.

The early inhabitants saw aggression and warfare with the Iroquois Confederation out of the area now defined as New York. The Beaver Wars of the mid-17th century saw the Iroquios claiing much of the area of Ohio for hunting and beaver-trapping. Epidemics from European contact also devastated the native populations by late 17th century. Towards the 18th century, the Algonquian peoples inhabited the region subsisting on agriculture and seasonal hunting. They became part of the larger global economy through the fur trade with Europeans and settlers.

With European contact and settlement, trade increased and Tobacco plantations were established. The Iroquoian Petun, Erie, Chonnonton, Wyandot, Mingo Seneca, and Iroquois Confederacy were the indigenous nations remaining from the 18th century onwards. Numerous massacres of the indigenous took place such as the Yellow Creek Massacre, Gnadenhutten, and Pontiac’s Rebellion school massacre until the remaining Native populations were pushed out especially with the Indian Removal Act of 1830.

The French settled and colonized the area with a system of trading posts regulating the fur trade. France and Great Britain fought over the region in the French and Indian War as well as in Europe during the Seven Year’s War. The Treaty of Paris in 1783 had the French cede control and the remainder of the Old Northwest to Great Britain. Come the American Revolution much of that changed. Control of the region went to the United States.

Ohio’s industry is based on coal mines, cargo transport, Lake Erie’s coastline (approx. 312 miles) for cargo ports, and manufacturing plants. Early industry collapses and economic despair brought great poverty to the area in the Appalachian Region – propelling the 1965 Congress Appalachian Regional Development Act addressing the concerns including over 29 counties as part of Appalachia. Ohio was devastated by the 1913 Great Dayton Flood when the Miami River watershed flooded destroying much of Dayton.

    Cities/Towns/Villages:

  • Akron
  • Canton
  • Center of the World
  • Cincinatti
  • Cleveland
  • Columbus
  • Cuyahoga Falls
  • Dayton
  • Elyria
  • Euclid
  • Hamilton
  • Kettering
  • Lakewood
  • Loraine
  • Mentor
  • Middletown
  • Newark
  • Newton Falls
  • Parma
  • Springfield
  • Toledo
  • Warren
  • Youngstown

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The ruins of Emmanuel Temple (Youngstown, Ohio)

Emmanuel Temple
~ 117 E. Rayen Ave, Youngstown, Ohio 44503 ~

This abandoned church was designed in Byzantine Revival architecture style in 1912. The First use of the building was as the El Emanuel Congregation Temple of Youngstown, Ohio. The first literary mention of the Temple I could find was in the “The American Architect” published in 1909, stating that plans were being made to erect a synagogue at 117 East Rayen Avenue in Youngstown. (https://books.google.com/books?id=2fJZAAAAYAAJ) The “American Synogogues: A Photo Journey” (http://jpreisler.com/AmericanSynagogue/OhioSamplePage.htm) stated its construction in 1912 depicting 2007 photographs of the temple still intact with front doors and none of the current damages. So it must have been in use until 2007 by the El Emanuel Temple.

According to the “History of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley Ohio, Volume 2 by J.G. Butler” the Youngstown Hebrew Institute was founded in 1907 establishing the Emanuel Congregation school at this address. The study rooms were fitted up in a frame building attached to this church building in the rear and conducted schooling until 1919 when attendance increased so much that they had to relocate the school to better accommodations at the Wood street public school building after regular school hours teaching reading/writing of the Hebrew language, religious training, and secular education from 1st to 6th grade. It was taken over in 2009 by the St. Andrewes Foundation of Faith as a Black American Heritage Church who were making plans to buy the Temple building according to a July 31, 2009 article. The St. Andrewes African Methodist Episcopal Church purchased the building in 2009 and appears to have been in ruin and abandoned by 2015. The church apparently changed its name three times through courses of moves. (http://www.vindy.com/news/2009/jul/31/its-name-has-changed-three-times-because-of-moves/) At some point the “I Am” Inc. Internet service provider used this street address according to Yelp. (https://www.yelp.com/biz/i-am-inc-youngstown) There was a report of a February 27, 2015 burglary of the stain glass windows while the building lie in ruin as reported here: http://www.vindy.com/news/2015/feb/27/police-apprehend-burglary-suspect-at-chu/. Property Shark web site (https://www.propertyshark.com/mason/Property/81097765/117-E-Rayen-Ave-Youngstown-OH-44503/) states the parcel ID as 53-017-0-057.00-0, Lot 781 50 x 150 in school district 53. It is reported to be .172 acres at 3,990 square feet and built in 1900 with a 150 depth, commercial structures 499. There was change of ownerships recorded for 03/07/2016; 08/02/2012; 02/09/2012; 05/11/2001; 01/01/1990. Its 2017-2018 property taxes was $1,033/year with a land value of $8,330, a building value $26,450; and a total market value of $34,780. (https://www.propertyshark.com/mason/Property/81097765/117-E-Rayen-Ave-Youngstown-OH-44503/)

This whole block of churches seem to have befell similar tragedies: one caught on fire from a lightning strike, another one burnt down, one damaged by a tornado, one that has been converted to a brewery, and others abandoned … makes one think that God or some other entity doesn’t want churches on this block). Located around the corner from the First Presbyterian Church, First Calvary Church, and Youngstown Masonic Temple.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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First Calvary Baptist Church (Youngstown, Ohio)

First Calvary Baptist Church
~ 126 E Wood St, Youngstown, Ohio 44503
Phone: (330) 747-5747 https://www.facebook.com/pages/First-Calvary-Baptist-Church/111807005522001 ~

The ominous church building at the corner with red boarded windows, a bell tower in ruins, and do not trespass signs on its doors makes one believe this church has befell similar tragedies as may of the other churches on the block (one caught on fire from a lightning strike, another one burnt down, one damaged by a tornado, one that has been converted to a brewery, and others abandoned … makes one think that God or some other entity doesn’t want churches on this block). It may however still be in operation – I cannot tell from its presence on the web as the last activity on its facebook page was in 2016 (and depicting the red boarded windows). The red windows make it creepy and there has to be a story behind them. If anyone knows, please share here. It appears to have had lots of activity prior to 2016 with bands, plays, events, and services. It apparently has had some roots with the First Calvary Pentacostal Church which is now in bankruptcy and hosting a barren building as well with over a million in debt. (linked article states the First Calvary Pentacostal Church had its roots as in 1918 when services for the then Mount Calvary Baptist Church were held in the basement of a home on St. Louis Ave.)

The Church is located on Wood Street near the center of Youngstown as a large Romanesque red brick building with numerous arches in its design including lovely arched windows that are now boarded up in red. This building is considered a city landmark and is featured on the self-guided walking tour in GPSmyCity.

According to the History of Youngstown and the Mahoning Valley Ohio, Volume 2 – On January 6, 1887 the First Baptist Church building was destroyed by fire following the explosion of natural gas in the building which stood across the street on the northeasst corner of the present courthouse lot. The rebuilding was completed in December 1887 though not rededicated until July 1, 1888. Rev Snodgrass remained pastor until February 1889 succeeded by Rev Clement Hall. Rev Henry Parrish was pastor from 1899 until 1904 then Rev. C. H. Pendleton from 1904-1916, followed by Rev. Barry B. Hall who is the present Pastor. Calvary Baptist Church is new in name but in descent the oldest of the Youngstown Baptist Churches. The Walnut street location was dedicated in 1867 becoming the Walnut Street Baptist Church.

More information here: https://www.gpsmycity.com/attractions/first-calvary-baptist-church-49961.html;

Located around the corner from the First Presbyterian Church, and Youngstown Masonic Temple.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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First Presbyterian Church / First Helen Chapel (Youngstown, Ohio)

First Helen Chapel – First Presbyterian Church
~ Youngstown, Ohio ~

This large church at the northwestern corner of Champion and Wood Streets in the heart of Youngstown, Ohio is a National Register of Historic Places church that was founded in 1799, the Helen Chapel built in 1889. GPS tours claims it to be the oldest church in the Western Reserve. The current sanctuary was dedicated in 1960 featuring classic Georgian Epoque elements. The architecture has four immense columns and three grand doorways.

Rated: Unknown of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

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Super 8

Super 8 Motels
~ Worldwide ~

I’ve spent many nights at the Super 8 – some locations are amazing, others can be seedy. It depends on the city and the manager, neighborhood, and environment. They are one of the world’s largest budget hotel chains – with motels throughout the United States, Canada, and China. They are part of the Wyndham Worldwide chain. The chain was started by Dennis Brown in 1972 alongside his partner Ron Rivett in 1973. They started renting rooms for $8.88/night which gave name to “Super 8”. The first motel was in Aberdeen South Dakota, hosting 60 rooms in 1974. It had a stucco exterior with an English Tudor style inspired by Rivett’s father-in-law who did stucco construction for a living, the remaining architecture was created by Rivett. Through the years they kept the English Tudor style as well as locating themselves near Holiday Inn’s as a marketing strategy. The first franchise was sold in 1976 in Gillette, Wyoming. They broke out of the Midwest in 1978 opening up in New York and Washington State. In 1976 they created a VIP club program which was later purchased by Hospitality Franchise Systems, then Cendant in 1993. This was dissolved in 2003 and replaced by TripRewards converting to Wyndham Rewards in 2008. By 2014 they had over 2,390 hotels. They opened their first hotel in China during 2004 in Beijing. They offer their guests standard amenities including free WiFi, a continental breakfast, hair dryers, coffee makers, laundry, and a lobby. Some locations have pools and meeting rooms, while some of the larger Super 8’s have restaurants.

Locations I’ve visited:

  • Lincoln City, Oregon: 3517 N, US-101, Lincoln City, OR 97367; (541) 996-9900. Rating: 4 stars out of 5. This location has a fabulous tourism placement across from a public beach. Its a rather small building and hotel with few rooms. Its less than a mile from the Chinook Winds casino. They have mini-fridges and microwaves in the room, coin laundry, free coffee, truck parking, and a small conference room. Its located along Highway 101.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

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Serpent Mound, Peebles, Ohio

Serpent Mound (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28935); Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Serpent Mound (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28935)

Serpent Mound
~ 3850 State Route 73, Peebles, Ohio 45660 ~ 1-800-752-2757 ~ www.arcofappalachia.org ~

One of the most world famous mound-culture sites in Ohio, Serpent Mound is an animal effigy mound that can be seen from the sky or up high. The site is well preserved and protected, with a nice parking lot, rest rooms, museum, and group picnic areas. There is a scaffolding tower you can climb on to view the serpent mound better. There is a $8 charge per vehicle to park, otherwise admission is free. Park is open 9 am until dusk. Museum closes at 4 pm. You no longer can climb or walk on the mounds as they are being preserved for future generations and protecting their sacredness. This site is the world’s largest surviving example of an ancient animal effigy mound. It winds over 1,348 fee oer the ground, and the earthworks are beautifully preserved example of an undulating serpent with an oval shape at the head. These kind of mounds were created by aboriginal inhabitants of the area prior to Euro-American settlers and exploration. The earthworks are very sophisticated art and unfortunately through the past, many were destroyed by Euro-American settlers, homesteaders, agriculture, and development. Early excavations revealed no artifacts to help identify which tribe or peoples created it. It is believed that multiple cultures could have contributed to it over time. There were later discovered, three conical burial mounds right by the Serpent Mound, two of which date to the Adeno Culture (800 BCE – 100 CE) and one to the Fort Ancient Culture (1000-1650 CE). A nearby village site was occupied by both the Adena and the Fort Ancient Cultures. Carbon dating from within the mound has shown conflicting dates for both Fort Ancient and Adena Time periods leaving the mound builders a remote mystery. Excavations in 2012 reveal the buried foundations of a fourth coil near the head. While there are some oral traditions suggesting possible interpretations of its meaning and use, there are also many modern theories trying to explain it, but no sound complete explanation exists. There are striking astronomical correlations with the moon and sun, with astrological observations that can be made throughout the year with various seasons and festivals. The serpent motif has a symbolic connection to many cultures as a symbol of cycles of birth and death, resurrection , and the higher/lower worlds.

A tributary of the Ohio Brush Creek runs through the park, bringing many species of plants and animals to live here, rare and common. The rock cliffs below the mound are dolomite limestone as the bedrock base providing classic karst features of grotto cliffs, and springs / sinkholes around the region. The earthworks sit atop a narrow flat ridge at the edge of an ancient crater at least 4 miles in diameter. The crater was formed by a meteorite impact that occurred 250 million years ago, giving lift to this magical formation. At the ancient crater’s center, the bedrock was pushed upward at least a thousand feet from its original position. Throughout the bowl of the structure there are massive cracks, faults, and places where to rock layers are jumbled and even upside down. The Mound has international recognition and has been submitted to UNESCO – United nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization for the World Heritage List.

Serpent Mound (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28935); Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Serpent Mound (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28935); Exploring the Moundbuilder – New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Seip Mound, Ohio

Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939).

Seip Earthworks
~ Chillicothe, Ohio ~

About fourteen miles away from Chillicothe, Ohio as part of the Hopewell Mound Complex as a large earthen work complex that has a low embankment forming a small circle and an irregular circle next to a square that make up a 121 acre site. Within this enclosure is a large elliptical mound and three smaller conjoined mounds, as well as several smaller mounds, and several structure outlines found within the excavations. The larger mound was originally 240 feet long, 160 feet wide, and 30 feet high. Visiting this site, you’ll see a portion of the reconstructed wall, a reconstructed mound, and a part of the original wall. Public parking is located at the front of the site, there is a porta-toilet, and picnic shelter with information signs located throughout the site. The site is open during daylight hours and is free.

This mound is considered one of the largest of the Hopewell Culture mounds in Ohio dating from 100 BCE to about 500 CE. It was built by Native Americans pre-contact. There is estimated that there was over 10,000 feet of embankment walls that once stood 10 feet in height. The site was originally excavated between 1925 and 1928 by the Ohio History Connection discovering a large variety of artifacts crafted from an assortment of exotic raw materials like copper and mica. The Mound is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is owned by the National Park Service.

Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder – New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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