Category Archives: The Gorge

Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon

Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway

Historic Columbia River Highway
Columbia River, State of Oregon, USA

The Historic Columbia River Highway runs along the Columbia River on the Oregon side for approximately 75 miles. It is considered one of the most scenic highways in Oregon and was the first planned scenic roadway in the United States. It begins in Troutdale and ends in The Dalles as a important safe passage being built between 1913 and 1922. Points of interest are the Bridge of the Gods and Cascade Locks. Another area of special interest is where the historic highway runs through Mosier and its preserved tunnels highlighting scenic tour days. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Landmark and is designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It was replaced for logistics, speed, safety, and accessibility with the construction of the Interstate Highway 84 during the 1930’s and 1950’s, falling to be a placade of history maintained by the state of Oregon as Historic Columbia River Highway No. 100 or Route 30 as well as the “Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.” Is was modeled after the great scenic roads of Europe and the project initiated by Sam Hill (local lawyer and entrepreneur) with the assistance of engineer Samuel C. Lancaster. It was envisioned first as a tourist play route for road trips in the Model T absorbing the beauty of the Columbia River and its waterfalls. It blended in as Highway Route 30 when the U.S. Highway system was established in 1926. It was an essential route taking advantage of the lowest crossing of the Cascade Mountains that was carved by the Columbia River during the Cascades mountain uplift providing a safe and economic alternative to the previous dangerous rafting portages used by the Oregon Trail. Originally at this crossing was the Barlow Road in 1846 around the south side of Mount Hood, followed by the Sandy wagon road in the 1870s, and the railway. It was a very difficult highway to create dealing with numerous curves, grades, distance, rockfalls, avalanches, and drops. All the locations with elements of natural beauty and scenic wonder were set as control points along the route to be included.

Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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Mosier Twin Tunnels, Mosier, Oregon

Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083)

Mosier Twin Tunnels
Mosier, Oregon

These remnants of the Columbia River Highway’s history echoes a time of great adventure, slow travel, and mesmerizing views. The Columbia River Highway once came through these cliffs back in 1921. There were 2 tunnels that originally were built through this high rock point to allow for travel. It was a popular highway then turned byway, then turned trail. It gave fabulous views of the Columbia River and the Gorge. The architects of the tunnels took their inspirated from the Axenstrasse along Lake Lucerne, Switzerland. But regardless of the sound design, these tunnels were plagued with troubles, especially rockfalls and automobile accidents. In 1954 they build the replacement road at water level along the river, and these tunnels were abandoned and fell into disrepair. The replacement road became Interstate 84. In 1995 the tunnels were re-opened for tourist byway access, and then converted to the Historic Columbia River Highway Trail, completely restored. It was opened to hikers in 2000 as a 4 1/4 mile hiking trail. Panoramic scenic overlooks, picnic tables, and paved trails appease the regular day-visitors to this hotspot along the Columbia. Great views of 18 mile island can be seen very nicely from several vantage points along the trail. THere is an etching of a message scratched into the rock past the sencond window in 1921 by a hunting party that was trapped there from snow fall in the past.

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Eighteen Mile Island, Columbia River, Oregon

18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095)

18 Mile IslandBR>~ Mosier, Oregon ~

Originally called “Chicken Charlie’s Island”, this little island is a scenic wonder along the Columbia River that is nearly 10 acre large island on the Oregon side of the Columbia River. It can be seen from Interstate Highway, milepost 174. It is located approximately a half mile from Mosier, Oregon. It is believed to have hosted a chicken ranch on int in 1904 owned by the Reither family. In 1915 it was inhabited by Charles Reither who lived on it until his death in 1963. It is a privately owned small rocky island that hosts navigational lights and was an island referenced by Meriwether Lewis during the Lewis and Clark expedition. It is pretty rocky, barren and remote. It hosts douglas firs, willows, wildflowers, cherry, blackberry, and a little sandy beach. There is a three story wood frame house on it that was privately built in 1969. It was later renamed “Eighteenmile Island” by the USGS in 1934. In 2007 the island and house was for sale to the amount of 1.4 million. Great views of the island can be seen from the Mosier Twin Tunnels hiking trail along the Historic Columbia River Highway.

18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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Mosier, Oregon

Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by  Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016.

Mosier, Oregon

A charming littler artistic town, Mosier is most popular for the Mosier Twin Tunnels hiking trail. The area was first settled by white Euro-Americans in 1854 and became a city in 1914. They built a post office here, then the Mosier School in 1920, which later became a charter school known as the Mosier Community School in 2003. The town is approximately .64 square miles. It is downstream of the 18 mile island and was along the Columbia River Highway long ago. Today, the 96 oil car derailment that caused a natural disaster on June 3, 2016 has placed Mosier on the map.

Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by  Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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Cascade Locks, Oregon

Bridge of the Gods - Cascade Locks, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25915. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Bridge of the Gods – Cascade Locks, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25915.

A very small tourist town (ca. 3 square miles) with just over 1,000 residents, sitting along the Columbia River is named appropriately for the Locks built atop the Cascade Rapids perpendicular to the town. It is a town located in Hood River County Oregon. The locks were built to improve navigation past the Cascade Rapids and the town grew up in support of the workers in the area. The locks were built in 1878 and completed in 1896. They became submerged in 1938 and no longer used, as they were replaced by the Bonneville Lock and Dam. They became the Cascade Locks Marina Park and Campground sitting in the shadow of the legendary yet modern Bridge of the Gods. Cascade Locks also is a few miles upstream from the Eagle Creek Gorge where the Pacific Crest Trail cuts through, making Cascade Locks a popular stop-off for the PCT Hikers. The town has been in political limelight of late as the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs in 1999 has attempted to build a off-reservation casino here, and since 2008 the city has been trying to sell off its well water to Nestle for bottling. In May 2016, voters from Hood River County was 65% in favor of stopping the Nestle operations, although the town is still fighting the County to allow it. This has recently made Cascade Locks a hotspot for ecological concern. The region is pleasantly warm (never too hot due to the winds) with dry summers, and no average monthly temperatures over 71.6 degrees fahrenheight giving it a warm summer Mediterranean climate. It is also home to a salmon hatchery.

Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken June 6, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Cascade Locks Marina ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26681 ).

The Canals and Locks

    “Cascades Canal and Locks – The need to improve travel in the Columbia River began with the flow of immigrants heading west and grew steadily as that flow swelled into a tidal wave of commerce. Getting around the rapids remained the greatest challenge. In 1876 Congress appropriated $90,000 to the US Army Corps of Engineers to study construction of a canal at the Cascades. For the next 20 years until the canal opened in 1896, a succession of Corps’ Engineers and private contractors struggled against the forces of nature to complete the monumental project. The canal was originally designed to be eight feet deep, fifty feet wide, and 7,200 feet long at low water with two locks. The cost was fixed at $1.2 million. No sooner had work begun in November 1878 than high winds, rain, and floating ice prevented river travel and isolated the work force at Cascade Locks. Nature had given notice that the cost of the change would be high. In 1880-1881, it was determined that specifications must be changed because of a miscalculation of the low water mark. The plans were revised so that there would be only one lock 90 feet wide and 462 feet long with a lift of 24 feet (later changed to 36 feet.) Work resumed on the canal in 1886. skilled stonemasons cut stones for the canal walls. Unmortared basalt rocks three feet thick were laid above the high water mark. There were now four sets of lock gates. The guard gates at the upper end of the canal were the largest built to that time. They were 55 feet by 52.6 feet and weighed 325,353 pounds. Because the river flood created each year in early June, no work could be done during the dry summer months. Each year at the beginning of the flood season, all of the equipment had to be moved and then re positioned after the flood was over. Work resumed in the fall but was hampered by heavy rainfall and frequent snows. Workers wore cumbersome oilskin coats and awkward boots, showing their efforts greatly. Funds were slow in coming and in 1886 Major Handbury noted that “a generation will have been born and gone to its grave between the beginning and ending of this enterprise’. At last after the flood damage of 1894 was repaired the canal was opened in 1896. 1.8 million dollars had been expended but the cost of human toil far exceeded any dollar amount. Given the isolated and extreme nature of the site, otherwise mundane project statistics are staggering. ” ~ sign at Cascade Locks Marina Park and Campground, Cascade Locks, Oregon

Troutdale, Oregon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903.  Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland:  http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281.  To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Troutdale, Oregon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25911. Life in the Gorge: Chronicle 22 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. The Gorge/Columbia River, Oregon-Washington. Photos taken March 27, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683; The Dalles: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=24107; White Salmon: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23677; Husum: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25039; Portland: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=281. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Hood River, Oregon

Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015.

Hood River, Oregon
http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683

A magnificent port city where the Hood River meets the Columbia River, “Hood River” is named after the river that flows through the city. A small city with just under 7,200 inhabitants (2010 census: 7167) it is a central point of tourism along the Columbia River and the Gorge. Hood River, the City is located approximately 30 miles north of Mount Hood – the tallest peak in all of Oregon. Across the Columbia River is White Salmon and Bingen, Washington. South of the city is Hood River Valley where some of the Gorge’s most famous apples, cherries, and pears are grown.

White Euro-American settlement in the area began in the 19th century, with the post office becoming established on September 30, 1858 and the city becoming incorporated in 1895. In 1908, Hood River became part of Hood River County after establishing its own county parting from Wasco County.

The city takes up approximately 3.35 square miles along the Columbia River, just west of the Hood River. The city resides in the transition zone between the wet temperate rainforest of the west and the dry shrub-steppe desert of the east granting the city a moderate climate with rainy winters and warm summers, and less rainfall than most of eastern Oregon averaging around 30 inches a year. Just 20 miles west in Cascade Locks, the annual precipitation is approximately 75 inches and 20 miles east, in the Dalles less than 15 inches a year. Temperatures are slightly cooler here than most nearby cities because of the air drainage off of Mt. Hood. Hood River area is known for the consistent high winds that channel down the Columbia River Gorge making it a very popular windsurfing location. Hood River has fast become one of the world’s most famous locations for windsurfing and kiteboarding. It is also a prime location for kayaking, mountain biking, skiing, and hiking in the U.S. featured in Sunset, Outside, Backpacker, Smithsonian, National Geographic Adventure, and the New York Times travel section as the “coolest small town” or the “fifth best ski-town in America”.

Hood River’s economy relies on agriculture, tourism, and sports recreation although the tech industry such as aerospace engineering with Google, Insitu and Hood Technologies being the largest employers in the region. In addition to cider and wine production, apple and pear orchards, the area is known for its cherries. The area is very popular for winery and cider tours, and the “Fruit Loop” because of the large Hood River based “The Fruit Company”. Hood River is known for its wineries and distilleries, especially Sail Brewing Company, one of Oregon’s most famous microbreweries. It is also home to Dakine the sports and clothing equipment manufacturer, Turtle Island Foods – the vegetarian food manufacturer who produces Tofurky. Hood River is also home to many arts and cultural gatherings. Each year in April, the Hood River Valley Blossom Festival is held and in October the Hood River Valley Harvest Festival. Each August, the annual Gorge Games takes place with competitions in 10 sports such as windsurfing, kiteboarding, outrigger canoeing, and rock climbing. Hood River is home to a protected harbor called “The Hook” where it is popular to teach windsurfing. There is also a Waterfront Park with public pool, Skate Park, biking trails, and ball fields. Numerous other smaller parks exist as well. There are also two 18-hole golf courses.

Hood River is also home to the Columbia Gorge Hotel (National Register place), History Museum of Hood River County, International Museum of Carousel Art, Western Antique Aero plane & Automobile Museum, and over 2 dozen other National Register of Historic Places.

Racially, Hood River is approximately 63% white, 24% Hispanic, 1.6% Asian/Pacific Islander, .5% African American, .6% Native American, 3% Mixed, and 7.4% from other races according to the 2010 census.

Hood River/Columbia River marina. Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River/Columbia River marina. Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.

Hood River, Oregon (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683). 01/22/16: Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 -   Photos from  January 22, 2016 . (c) 2016 - photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley /   Leaf McGowan   of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).
Hood River, Oregon (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683). 01/22/16: Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17903 – Photos from January 22, 2016 . (c) 2016 – photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Leaf McGowan of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).
Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.

Hood River beach - Exploring Hood River - Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by   Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.
Hood River beach – Exploring Hood River – Monday, 28 December 2015. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. Hood River: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=23683. Columbia river; http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151.

    “Hood River {from Steamboats to Sailboards} Gale-Force winds bedeviled explorers and emigrants alike in the Columbia River Gorge. Journals from the 1800s depict travel as treacherous through the singular passage in the Cascade Range where 60 mile per hour gusts are common. By the 1880s, steamboats and a new railroad linked Hood River with communities to the east and west. Spectacular scenery and a dryer climate made this blustery place a popular escape from the dampness and drizzle of western Oregon. When the Historic Columbia River Highway reached Hood River in 1916, Portlanders flocked to this hamlet in their Model T’s. Today the same conditions that created dry, breezy appeal at the turn of the century offer perfect conditions for windsurfing. Many visitors now come to Hood River just to glimpse “board heads” engaged in this colorful sport – Mountaineering became popular in the West during the 1890s and Hood River allowed the best access to Mt. Hood. Cloud Cap Inn, Oregon’s oldest mountain resort was constructed at the 6000 foot level of the mountain’s North Slope in 1889. The Inn was a favorite summer destination for hikers, and mountain climbers. Today it is a base for mountain rescue operations. Excursions “round the mountain” from Hood River were a must when the Mt. Hood Loop Road opened in 1925. Lumber baron Simon Benson built the Columbia Gorge Hotel right) on a cliff overlooking the river in 1921 for $500,000. The hotel catered to upscale clientele serving dainty lunches and salmon dinners. In the center of town, the Hood River Hotel provided accommodations for commercial travelers. Windsurfing once an obscure avocation for the brave or foolhardy, is today a multi-million-dollar industry in the Columbia River Gorge. ” ~ information sign, Hood River beach by the bridge, Hood River, Oregon.

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