Ghosts of Williamsburg Candlelight Walking Tour – Williamsburg, VA

Wednesday, 21 May 2008 – Part 6 (8:00-9:30 pm)

Williamsburg, Virginia

So many people showed up for the Ghost walking tours this evening that they had to split us up into 4 separate tours. Interesting. This is with only one company. There were several other companies with the same amount of crowds, it was crazy.

Ghosts of Williamsburg candlelight walking Tour * http://www.theghosttour.com/ * meet in front of the William and Mary bookstore at the main gate for historic Williamsburg, Virginia * 757. 565.4821


numerous orbs in front of the George Wythe House

A crowd is led by lantern candle light down the streets of historic Colonial Williamsburg and on the site of the 2nd oldest University in the United States – William and Mary. For only $10 you get an hour long tour covering various subjects of folklore and haunted history in the area that eventually leads you to the graveyard. Based on the book The Ghosts of Williamsburg by L.B. Taylor. It was a very interesting and informative walk. I thought I caught a glimpse of something in the window of the Indian dorm on William and Mary, as well as something in the shadows near the George Wythe House. Looking over the photographs, lots of orbs and interesting elements and oddities to the pictures. Great tour! According to the tour guides it’s notorious that the cameras attract and capture unexplainable orbs, vapors, colors and shapes.
Rating 4.5 stars out of 5. Taken 5/21/2008.





Afterwards, I returned to the hostel and had a good night’s rest. Tomorrow Yorktown and then a return to Washington D.C. for the remainder of the National Geographic Society Live events on the Hidden Treasures of Afghanistan, as well as attending “Goth Prom”.




The site of William and Mary was first established as a location for England’s plan to convert the native’s over to Christianity and was meant as a school of higher education for both Native American men and the sons of the colonists at Jamestown. This “University” was initiated to start that project. However the Indian Massacre of 1622 prevented its success and integration for almost 70 years. When young Indian children were taken in and raised as the colonist’s own, many were sent to this building – an Indian dorm, the Brafferton building. These 10 year old boys were forcefully taken from their families and forced to become like the colonists. Apparently the Indian children were locked up within and abused. They are believed to haunt this location. People claim to hear beating of drums, crying, screams, footsteps, and a boy running across the soccer green at night. One boy apparently each night lowered a rope from his window to run across the green since he loved to run. One night, he was found dead of unknown causes but believed to have been murdered by a colonist blaming him for deaths during the massacre. Often some state you can see Indian children faces in the top right window.








The Presidents House / Wren House. The home to the current President / Dean of students at William and Mary. His house is believed to be haunted by a french soldier of the revolutionary war who supposedly died in the building when it was a makeshift hospital. One of the inhabitants of the building once discovered the body of a 13 year old girl cemented in the closet walls. On the third floor window are scratches in the window “O Fatal Day” – no one knows why. Students studying in William and Mary’s Wren Building began to hear footsteps on the upper floors, according to a new book by Daniel Barefoot entitled “Haunted Halls of Ivy: Ghosts of Southern Colleges and Universities.” It is speculated, according to the review, that the footsteps were those of Christopher Wren’s spirit, itself. Others thought they belonged to a French soldier, who died in the building. Barefoot dates the “haunting” back to the Revolution, when the building was used as a hospital for French and American troops. According to Barefoot, the President’s House is occupied by ghosts from the Civil War, as it was used to house captured Southern soldiers. “Many tried to escape, and some are still trying,” Barefoot wrote.