Tag Archives: burials

Men-At-Tol

Men-At-Tol
Near Madron and Lanyon Farm, Penwith, Cornwall, England

The infamous holey-stone known as “Men-an-tol” is located in tip of Cornwall near Madron and Lanyon Farm. This is one of England’s most highly photographed megalithic sites. The name “Men-An-Tol” means “holed stone”. Its purpose is unknown, but theorized to be a Druid ritual site, A Faerie Portal, A calendar, A gateway to the Otherworlds, A burial site, A ritual site, as well as a half a dozen other suggestions … but the truth is, its purpose still remains a mystery. There are only four stones remaining that are known parts of the monument – two upright stones with the holed stone inbetween them, and a fallen stone at the foot of the western upright. It is believed, especially from antiquarian illustrations, that through the ages, these stones have been moved around and re-arranged at various times. In the 18th century, William Borlase describes the layout as triangular. During the 19th century, JT Blight proposed that the site is the remains of a stone circle. If this was the case, the holed stone would probably be aligned along the circumference of the circle and have a special ritual significance by providing a lens through which to view other sites or features, or as some propose, a window into other worlds. Archaeological theory proposes it as a component of a burial chamber or cist dating from the Bronze Age but lacks but since no extensive excavations have been conducted. WC Borlase in 1885 discovered a single flaked flint. Holed stones are rare in Cornwall, and outside of this site – there is only the Tolvan Stone near Gweek. All the others are much smaller with holes less than 15 cm in diameter, too small for a human (adult or infant) to pass through. There is much folklore surrounding the ‘men-at-tol’ as well as traditions. The site is known for curing many ailments, especially rickets in children, by passing the sufferer through the hole. It is also utilized in rituals and rites to travel between various worlds. There is believed to be a faerie or piskie guardian who lives here that makes the miraculous cures. It is believed that changeling babies were brought here and passed through the stone in order for the mother to get the real child back. Local legends state that if at full moon a woman passes through the holed stone seven times backwards she would soon become pregnant. For centuries children with rickets were passed naked through the hole to heal them. The circular stones line up exactly with the center stone at Boscawen-Un. It has been known as a alternative cure for ‘scrofulous taint” or the “Kings Evil”. Men-At-Tol was also legendary for fixing back problems. This mere fact gave it the name “Crick stone”. Some saw the site as a protection against witchcraft and ill-wishes, while others feel it can be utilized for augury or fortune telling. With the three upright granite stones – the round stone in the middle holed out with two small standing to each side in front and behind the holey stone, form a three-dimensional “101”.

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Roadside Markers and Graves in Hawaii


Roadside marker and grave between Punalu’u and Kona

Roadside Markers and Graves in Hawaii
All along Route 11 on the Big Island of Hawaii are memorial markers, monuments, and graves for those who have lost their lives. In addition to the monuments are quite a few roadside cemeteries. Above is one of the most interesting ones I encountered in Hawaii, it was a tree, decorated with all the seasons – you could find Halloween memorabilia, Easter, Xmas, etc. Not quite sure who it was dedicated to. But is a great example of the roadside markers. These are commemoratives usually to pay tribute to someone who has passed either suddenly or unexpectedly while away from home. The memorials/markers are not grave site headstones marking where the body/ies lay, but rather often where they died or the last place they were alive. This is usually put together by family or friends and consist of a cross, a bunch of flowers taped to trees or road signs, signs, piles of rocks, or some sort of marker – sometimes with a handwritten message and personal mementos. This is a pretty common tradition throughout the world’s cultures, especially modern culture, replacing the fact that people can’t be buried anymore where they died. In the United States, one theory points to coming from early hispanic settlers of the Southwestern United States often on long trails, though earlier were actual grave markers for the burial then incorporating the practice of a monument or marker since funerary laws changed the ability to bury their dead where they fell. The modern evolution of this practice is very common where car crashes occured and a person died. There are descansos constructed in similar style often decorated specially for holidays or special anniversaries in a person’s life. For children, often with their toys, or votives added for special occasions. The practice sprung up in Australia and has been estimated to be 1 in 5 road deaths to be memorialized at the site of the crash, especially since 1990. They are legally protected in the State of New Mexico from being altered or touched, even by road construction while they are banned in Colorado, Massachusetts, and Wisconsin. California charges residents a $1,000 to permit one.


Graveyard along highway between Punalu’u and Kona

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Worms Dom (Cathedral) – Worms, Germany


replica monument of the Worms Dom

    Worms Dom (Cathedral)
    The Worms Dom, or “Wormser Dom” is also known as the “Cathedral of St Peter”. This is the principal church and chief building of the city of Worms, Germany. It represents one of the finest Romanesque churches on the Rhine, next to Speyer and Mainz. It consists of a impressive basilica, two large domes with a choir on each end, four round towers, and an imposing exterior of the red sandstone from which it is build and is 110 m long, 27 m wide (36 m including the transepts), and with the nave is 26 meters high, and 40 meters high with the dome. The Catholic diocese that resided here ended in 1800. The only original structure of the church remaining from its original construction in 1110 is the ground plan and lower part of the western towers. The rest was finished by 1181, with the west choir and vaulting completed in the 13th century, south portal in 14th century, and central dome was rebuilt. Ornamentation of the older church was simple with unique sculptures showing salvation stories. The baptismal font contain 5 remarkable reliefs from the late 15th century. The Dom contains the burials of Conrad I (Duke of Carinthia), Conrad II (Duke of Carinthia), Conrad (Duke of Lorraine), Heny of Speyer, and Queen Matilda (d. 1034), consort of Henry I of France and daughter of Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor.

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Burials JR102C and 156C, Jamestown Historical Site, Virginia

Burial JR102C
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]
“Burial site of a European man, aged about 19, a gunshot victim, interred sometime during the years 1607-1620”

Burial JR156C
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]
“Burial site of a European woman, aged between 40 and 55, interred in the 1620’s”


Burial JR1046B
[ insert from the interpretive display at Jamestowne park ]
“Burial of a European Man estimated age mid-thirties, interred with a captain’s leading staff, this is likely the grave of Captain Bartholomew Gosnold, the ‘prime moving’ force behind the ‘plantation’ here at Jamestown”


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