Tag Archives: Civil War

Fort Worden, WA

Fort Worden ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26407), Port Townsend, WA ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26403). Exploring Olympic Peninsula - Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Fort Worden ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26407), Port Townsend, WA ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26403). Exploring Olympic Peninsula – Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

Fort Worden, Washington

Right in the heart of Port Townsend is a historic US Military fort turned into a State Park. It resides along the Admiralty Inlet that flows by Port Townsend. The fort property, now owned by the National Park Service consists of 433 acres, originally as a US Army base to protect Puget Sound from invading forces from 1902 to 1953, named after U.S. Navy Admiral John Lorimer Worden who commanded the USS Monitor during the American Civil War. After it was decommissioned in 1953 and purchased in 1957 converted to a juvenile detention facility, and then turned to a State Park in 1973. Because the Admiralty Inlet was a strategic defense location for Puget Sound, three forts were built along the shores – Fort Worden, Fort Casey, and Fort Flagler creating a “Triangle of Fire” with huge guns thwarting any invasive force coming from sea. The forts were never used for war and never fired a shot. During World War I the guns were removed and used in Europe. It was primarily a training base for military applications. During World War II it became the headquarters of the Harbor Defense Command and jointly operated by the Navy and Army in a team effort. The artillery units were disbanded after World War II and gun batteries dismantled. During the Korean war a 2nd Engineer Special brigade was stationed here before being ordered to Korea to reinforce the Far East Command. After this, in 1957 the fort was in the hands of the state of Washington for diagnosis and treatment of troubled youths. Remnants of various batteries litter the landscape, some of which are open to explore by park visitors. The park also houses the Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum, a balloon hanger used by airships, three 3-inch anti-aircraft gun emplacements, several restored quarters on Officer’s Row, Point Wilson lighthouse, a campground, Port Townsend Marine Science Center, and lots of beaches for recreational use. In 1983 the movie “An Officer and a Gentleman” was filmed here. In 2002 the movie “The Ring” was also filmed here.

Fort Worden ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26407), Port Townsend, WA ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26403). Exploring Olympic Peninsula - Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Fort Worden ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26407), Port Townsend, WA ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26403). Exploring Olympic Peninsula – Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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State of Tennessee

photos 12/24/12 018-021

Tennessee, United States of America

When I think of Tennessee, I think of Nashville, Elvis, and Bourbon. Obviously, there is more to the state. The state is dominated by wilderness, especially the Appalachian mountains in the east and the Mississippi river in the west. It is the 36th most extensive and 17th most populated state in the United States. The state is surrounded by Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia, Arkansas, and Missouri. The heartbeat of Tennessee is the heart of country music, Nashville. Tennessee was the first constitutional government west of the Appalachians though formerly the territory belonged to North Carolina. Admitted to the Union as its own state, making up number 16, it joined the United States on June 1, 1796. It was also the last state to leave the Union to join the Confederacy during the Civil War, and the first to come back to the Union at the end of the war. During the War, Tennessee supplied more soldiers to the confederacy than any other state, and is known for the worst racial strife and the formation of the Ku Klux Klan in 1866 as well as the assassination of Martin Luther King in 1968 (Memphis). Today, it stands as a diversified economy with ties into music and technology. Since the 1940’s it was used to house the Manhattan Project’s uranium enrichment facilities used for building the world’s first atomic bomb. The music industry has popularized Tennessee with many forms of rock and roll, blues, country, and rockabilly especially in Memphis and Nashville. Some say the Blues was born in Memphis (1909). Sun Records dominates the industry, home to Johnny Cash, Elvis, Carl Perkins, Rov Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis, Charlie Rich, and many others. Other industries that Tennessee is well known for is tourism, manufacturing, and agriculture. Some of their more popular products are transportation/electrical equipment, cattle, soybeans, bourbon, and poultry.

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This page is in progress and updates will be frequent in the near future, please come back soon for more content and photos If you are a business or attraction that has been reviewed here and would like to add details, a re-review, or to request an update please email Technogypsie @ gmail . com (remove spaces)
This page was last updated on 8/16/2015

    References:

  • Baurley, Thomas 2015 Alternative America: Travel Guide to the U.S.A. Technogypsie Publications, Riverside, California.
  • McGowan, Leaf 2015 Magical America. Technogypsie Publications, Riverside, California.
  • Wikipedia 2015 “United States of America” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Website https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States referenced 8/16/15.

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Savannah, Georgia

2012 Savannah SantaCon

Savannah, Georgia

The Southern United States can boast quite a few cities, but none more than Savannah, Georgia for its ultimate southern charm, southern belles, manors, and plantations. Named after the river it was along, most likely derived from variant names of the Shawnee who once lived in the area. This tribe destroyed the Westo here. The Shawnee were also known as the Savano, Shawano, and the Savannah, hence the namesake. Savannah lies roughly 20 miles upriver along the Savannah river from the Atlantic Ocean and encompasses over 108 square miles. The city layout was founded by James Oglethorpe under his “Oglethorpe Plan”. General Oglethorpe, a well known British philanthropist and representative of King George II for the American Colonies, was originally sent to the area to create a buffer south of the Savannah River to protect the area from Spain in Florida and France in Louisiana. They landed this area in 1733 near Yamacraw Bluff where they were greeted by the Yamacraws, Tomochichi, and John/Mary Musgrove (Indian traders who served as translators for them). It is at this point that the city was founded, as well as the colony of Georgia. By 1751, it became a Royal Colony and the official capital of colonial Georgia. When America was approaching its dissent and revolution, and issues with British taxation were in upheaval, the armed resistance from Lexington and Concord reached Savannah in May of 1775, and upon congress approval, Georgia delegates decided to join the other 12 colonies to unite against the British. It was a strategic port during the American Revolution as well as the Civil War. On September 11, 1779 American forces led by General Benjamin Lincoln and Count Casimir Pulaski met northwest of Savannah. This was followed by the French fleet debarking over 3,200 French, Irish, and Haitian soldiers to march on Savannah to support the American attack. Allied forces laid siege to the city under a 5 day bombardment. It failed, and Savannah remained under British Control for more than 6 months until General Cornwallis surrendered to General George Washington at Yorktown Virginia in October of 1781. Today it is a hotspot for tourism, as well as being a major industrial center and seaport. Georgia’s 5th largest city, Savannah attracts millions of tourists annually, and is most known for its iconography, architecture, being the birthplace of Juliette Gordon Low (founder of the US Girl Scouts), the Georgia Historical Society, the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, the First African Baptist Church, the Mickve Israel Temple, its downtown area, and being one of the largest National Historic Landmark Districts in the United States.

Savannah, Georgia

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Columbia Canal (Columbia, SC)

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Columbia Canal
* Columbia Riverfront Park * Columbia * South Carolina * National Register of Historic Places, No. 79002392 *

Interlaced within the heart of Columbia, South Carolina is a series of canals built in the early 1800’s by indentured Irishmen formed to provide direct water routes between the uplands and the lowlands along the fall line. Utilizing the Congaree River and Broad Rivers, it centers in the Columbia Riverfront Park where the canal is used to generate hydro-electrical power for South Carolina Electric and Gas company. Officially built in 1820 as a means for navigation and transportation along the rapids of the Broad River and Saluda river where they merge together to create the Congaree River. The canal was built in a natural ravine that existed between the city and the rivers, beginning between Lumber street (Calhoun street) and Richland street. It followed the Congaree for approximately 3 miles ending across from Granby Landing just north of the railroad bridges. Completed in 1824 it was 12 feet wide and 2.5 feet deep north of Senate street, and 18 feet wide and 4 feet deep south of there with a 8 foot wide towpath on either side. It had 4 lifting locks and a guard lock for the 34 ft descent of the river with a diversion dam across the Broad River to allow access from the Saluda Canal. Three waste tiers were built to prevent the canal from flooding, and this all linked into a separate canal called the Bull Sluice just north on the Broad River which had its own lock. By 1840 the state decided to drop its subsidy of the canal, and with the introduction of the 1842 railroads, its use declined. During the Civil war its hydro-electrical power was used to make gunpowder as well as for a grist mill run by the state penitentiary as well as a saw mill. By 1888 it was re-designed into a industrial power supply – revisions starting at Gervais street and extending 3 1/2 miles north along the Congaree and Broad Rivers, 150 feet wide and 10 feet deep with a new diversion dam, entry lock, and waste weir. In full use by 1891. Columbia Mill depended on it for textile production and was then utilized by the Columbia Hydro Plant built at its southern end producing power for the city, street railway system, and local industry.

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Charleston Custom House

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United States Custom House – Charleston
* 200 E Bay St * Charleston * SC * 29401 * (843) 579-6500 *

Standing tall along the downtown East Bay street, the harbor, and waterfront park in Charleston, South Carolina is the iconic United States Custom House. A fine example of a age-old public building telling tales about Charleston’s once thriving port culture. It was designed with the Roman Corinthian order cruciform building structure is monumental in scale measuring over 259 feet east-west, and 152 feet north-south, constructed of marble, stone, and granite. Its interior revolves around a marble two-story center room called “The Business Room” and its second floor gallery is supported by 14 Corinthian columns into which most offices open up to. Ornamental ceiling with artificial skylights, the American flag, and other classical patriotic motifs and symbols. The site was built between East bay and the Cooper River on land that Congress purchased in 1849. This location was first the site of Craven’s Bastion, a colonial era fortification. It was designed by Charleston architect Edward C. Jones and Edward Brickell White. During the Civil War, the building was left unfinished and left suspended until 1870 when plans were set into motion to work on the original design. It was completed in 1879 and has been used ever since as a United States Custom House. It is not opened for viewing to the public. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 9, 1974.

    References/Recommended Reading:
  • NPS.GOV: Charleston United States Custom House. http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/charleston/usc.htm. Website referenced May 2, 2013.
  • Wikipedia: Charleston Custom House. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Custom_House_(Charleston,_South_Carolina). Website referenced May 2, 2013.

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Windsor Ruins (Mississippi)


Windsor Ruins
Bruinsburg, Mississippi
One of Mississippi’s most fantastic secrets, hidden away in the swamps out in the middle of nowhere, are the ghostly remains of the Windsor plantation. The Windsor plantation was built from 1859-1861. The plantation was built, owned, and first inhabited by Smith Daniell who only was able to live in the mansion for a few weeks before he passed away at age 34. Smith Coffee Daniell II was born in 1826 as a son of a Indian fighter turned farmer. He was married to his cousin Chatherine Freeland (1830-1903) who bore him three children. Construction of the mansion cost him $175,000 to build it which included its furnishings. It was built with slave labor. The construction was designed by David Shroder. The original grounds were well over 2,600 acres. Atop the mansion was a roof observatory where Mark Twain would muse over the Mississippi River that inspired his works of art. Twain compared the plantation to a college instead of residence because of how large the plantation was. This observatory was also home to signal equipment that would notify Confederate troops of Yankee movement. The mansion was fixed with elaborate furnishings in its beginning, hosting wrought iron staircases to get from each of the four floors. Tanks resided in the attic to provide water for the baths within. There was 25 rooms with 25 fireplaces, a basement with a school room, dairy, commissary, doctor’s office, and plenty of storage rooms. The main floor held the master bedroom, a bath, 2 parlors, a study, a dining room, and a library. The third floor were 9 more bedrooms and an additional bath. The fourth floor held a unfinished ballroom. The roof held an observatory. It was a distinct portrayal of Southern Life during its era. The Mansion saw a bit of death – from Smith Daniell’s death to a yankee who was shot in the front doorway. Other deaths took place when the mansion once served as a union hospital and observation post during the civil war. Its involvement in the Civil War as a hospital saved it from being burned down to the ground during the Civil War. After the War it was burnt down during an accidental fire involving a misplaced cigar on the upper balcony during a house party on February 17, 1890. After the fire, it was never rebuilt. Parts of the mansion were scavenged, and even the wrought iron staircase found its home at nearby Alcorn State University. All that remain of the ruins is the foundation and the 23 – 30′ high Corinthian columns, some pieces of broken china, a set of wrought iron stairs, and portions of the balustrade. The Ruins have become famous, especially by Hollywood, as it was used as a setting for films such as “Raintree Country” (1957) and “Ghosts of Mississippi”. The property is now owned and maintained by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on November 23, 1971. The Ruins are located 12 miles southwest of Port Gibson off Highway 552. Also of interest in the area is the Ghost town of Rodney. A must see for any history buff. Rating : 5 stars out of 5. Visited 6/22/2005.

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Rainbows, Road Dogs, Drainbows, Modern Hippies, and the decline of the Rainbow Gathering in the United States

This in of itself is going to be a controversial blog piece on my experiences and observation of the decline of the sub-cultural phenomena of what is referred to as “the Rainbow Gathering ” and the “Rainbow Subculture”. I realize my writing this blog entry will cause some turmoil and distraught emotions by those who read it who are very much still part of this movement, and some may be quite angry with these thoughts, observations, and disclosure. I realize it may alienate some friends of mine, some of whom may be close. I apologize in advance for this, but have to state this is how I feel and have a need to rant about how I see the movement that I once greatly admired and proud to be part of in the distant past become a very destructive, ego-centric, and parasitic phenomena. I don’t know if there is ‘hope’ for this movement. I don’t know if it could ever go back to the beautiful experience that it once was. But as it stands with my recent experiences of watching it degrading over the last 20 years, I personally, albeit biased, believe it has lost hope. Some of its recent offshoot ‘commercial’ ventures seem to carry on some of its similiar aspects. I apologize in advance to those that this blog might offend. But I have a need to release it off my chest and vent. Perhaps this will serve as nothing other than to offend, but perhaps it might make change in the hearts and minds of those that that care about its destructive essence in this day and age.

Rainbow Gatherings are the encampments of a migratory nomadic modern day people who live in the movement as their home, merged with those ‘family’ that attend a few times a year, the family that do just the annual pilgrimage, and the weekend warrior types who setup temporary intentional communities wherever they travel. These events are typically established in outdoor settings, in every state within the United States of America, throughout Canada, and internationally in most countries. Often, the ‘non-organizing lot’ of the core family can be found at all of these gatherings, including those in countries outside of the USA. The entire movement of intentional community espouses and focalize on ideals of peace, love, harmony, freedom, and community; much to the ideals of the hippie and anti-war movements in the 1960’s throughout America. They borrow much of the ideology from the 60’s, the dress, the sub-culture, and claim to have their origins from that era. The movement consciously expresses themselves as an alternative to mainstream popular culture, consumerism, capitalism, and mass media. Central to the movement is the “Rainbow Family of Living Light” who are building a self-induced Utopian society comprised of bohemian and hippie sub-culture. It is quite possible that it is true that this movement was birthed in the 1960’s with the hippie and anti-war counterculture that was birthed at that time. The Rainbow tribe have throughout the years attempted to promote a longstanding rumor that the Gathering was/is recognized by the Elders of the Hopi people as the fulfillment of a Hopi prophecy. This was debunked by Micheal I. Niman who wrote in 1997 the book called “People of the Rainbow: A Nomadic Utopia”. He traced the Hopi prophecies to the 1962 book “Warriors of the Rainbow” by WIlliam Willoya and Vinson Brown who compares prophecy of major religious sects throughout the world and tales of visions from North American natives. This was stemmed from a portion of the legend that was erroneously attributed to the Rainbow because of the mention of the “Warriors of the Rainbow” in prophecy out of the phrase “When the earth is ravaged and the animals are dying, a new tribe of people shall come unto the earth from many colors, classes, creeds, and who by their actions and deeds shall make the earth green again. They will be known as the warriors of the Rainbow.”

Rainbow views the mainstream culture as “Babylon” believing that the mainstream’s modern lifestyles and systems of government are unhealthy and no longer in harmony with the Earth or nature. I can attune with some of this and was one of the forefront reasons that I became part of the Rainbow Gathering movement when I first embraced it in the 1980’s. The first original Gathering was held in Colorado during July 1972 – since then it has occurred annually in the United States around the week embracing the 4th of July weekend in some democratically chosen location on National Forest land. Regional and national gatherings spurred by local state groups and family occur in just about every one of the 50 states, and most local cities have at least a potluck either weekly, monthly, or quarterly to keep family together. The movement was so popular in the United States, as international attendance increased the movement spread outside of the U.S.A. boundaries into many other countries who have tried to re-create the beauty and balance that ‘Rainbow’ originally possessed. The largest gatherings have been composed of upwards of unreliable counts of 30,000-40,000 attendees at a National Gathering.

“Rainbow Gathering 2008: Wyoming, July 4th”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWvmVQ8Y0KI

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Yorktown, Virginia

Old Yorktown, Virginia * http://www.yorkcounty.gov/tourism/


Yorktown, Virginia

Yorktown was named after England’s York and was established as a port for shipping tobacco to Europe. It is the 3rd part of Virginia’s infamous “Historic Triangle” that connects it with Jamestown and Williamsburg. Yorktown is a small village of roughly 203 citizens (2000 census) and is considered a “Census-designated place” in York County, Virginia. It is also York County’s county seat and is one of the eight original shires that formed in colonial Virginia in 1634. Yorktown is most famous for the surrender of General Cornwallis of the English army to General George Washington of the newly forming United States of America in 1781. It was this surrender that effectively ended the American Revolutionary War even though the war continued for another year. It was here as well that another American war – the American Civil War (1861-1865) prominently figurred as a placehold in being a major port that supplied northern and southern towns thereby placing it into being a battlefield a second time. There are only 9 buildings that survive from the Colonial period as well as many of the earthworks dug by the besieging American and French forces. There is also a memorial to the French war dead of the battle. Its a small quaint town. Nothing like Jamestown or Williamsburg and holds an attraction of its own. While I was visiting, most of the museums of historic buildings were closed and there were no activities. It does have a nice public white-sand beach great for summer activities and a little bit of shopping. Its a nice exit to the excitement of Jamestown and Williamsburg. Rating 3.5 stars out of 5. Visited 5/22/2008.

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