Tag Archives: coasts

Narooma

Narooma
New South Wales, Australia

By far, my most favorite place in Australia, Narooma is a panoramic sensation for the beach enthusiast. Think the historic Highway 101 Coastal Oregon route meets the Bahamas and you have “Narooma”. The Aborigine suitably called this area “Clear blue waters” and nothing more could be true. Crystal clear waters. A town of about 3,000 and a strip of geological wonders along the beach, this captures the contrast of earth and water perfectly. The rocks found near Narooma include the Narooma Chert that dates to Cambrian times. There are also underwater remains of a submarine volcano with pillow lava offshore. The Island known as “Montague Island”, now a National Park and Wildlife Refuge, is 8 kilometers offshore from Narooma and was one of the islands sighted by Captain Cook in 1770. The island has 8 known rainforests on it. The area brought white settlers for timber, gold, and fishing. It was declared a port in 1884, opened its first school in 1886, and its first post office in 1889, and originally was only accessed via the sea. By the 20th century, it became a major tourist destination and boomed in oyster farming. Then saw construction of the first major bridge to be constructed on the Princes Highway, improving access by road. In 1937, industry boomed again with a local cannery opening its doors to process tuna and salmon which eventually saw a drought of salmon causing the cannery to close its doors. Narooma was also home to the annual Great Southern Blues and Rockabilly Festival held in October until it moved to Batesman Bay in 2010. Rating 5 stars out of 5.

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Green Cape Light House

Green Cape Light House * Bittangee Bay/Ben Boyd National Forest
New South Wales, Australia

Just to the side of Bittangee Bay/Ben Boyd National Forest
, about 7 km hike away, is the stunning “Green Cape” Lighthouse. Set within the tip of Green Cape, overseeing Disaster Bay in the southern most part of New South Wales in Australia. It is Australia’s first all-concrete lighthouse, and the second tallest as well as the furthest south lighthouse in New South Wales. It was built in 1880 by James Barnett as a all-concrete structure in response to a series of wrecks in the bay and started out as a stone structure. He ran into difficulties in moving materials to the site as the safest anchorage spot was Bittangabee Bay, about 7 kilometers away through forest and various land slopes. Originally, he built the Bittangee Bay Storage building where materials where dropped off from ships until they could be courriered over to the site. Eventually a 7 km long wooden tramway was constructed from the building to the lighthouse spot, and horses would pull cargo from destination A to B during 1881 through 1960’s. By the 1990’s, the lighthouse was converted over to a solar powered lens on a modern lattice steel tower next to the historic concrete lighthouse. Since 1992, it has been solar powered. Visitors can go to the lighthouse in the Ben Boyd National Park anytime, though guided tours are only available on select dates. Some accomodations are available in the two assistant keeper’s cottages on reservation. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Northern Ireland’s Causeway Coast


Coastal Highway – Giants Causeway

Causeway Coast, Northern Ireland
Just north of Belfast, along Northern Ireland’s scenic and magnificent coastline is what has come to be known as the “Causeway Coast and Antrim Glens”. It is absolutely not to miss during any trip to Ireland. Focused alot around the geological phenomena known as “The Giant’s causeway”, this breathtaking and rugged coastline auto route is a voyage that should no be rushed as one follows the coastline, through small villages, towns, by castles, rocky shores, silent glens, and lush forest parks. An area full of mythology as well.


Northern Ireland Coast

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Sennen Cove (Cornwall, England)

Sennen Cove:
Cornwall, England

Approximately one mile northeast of Land’s End is the small coastal community of Sennen Cove. It is a scenic paradise for beach-goers and its beaches are more popular to the locals than Land’s End. In 2000, its population was a heaping 180 inhabitants. While not a cove in a geological sense, it fits more under the descriptor of being a Bay. Many old granite mining cottages can be found in the area that have been converted to vacation stays. Many of these cottages are arranged in terraces. It is also a base station ofr several submarine telecommunications cables. It is a hotspot to the surfing enthuasiasts because of its great surfing conditions as it is protected from winds and swell. The village has a very laid back and friendly atmosphere. Sennen Cove is also home to the first UK canine lifeguard named “Bilbo” who started his job in 2005 raising awareness to tourists about the dangers of swimming outside the designated zones via campaign called “Bilbo Says”. Sennen Cove is also home to a RNLI lifeboat station run by volunteers since 1953.

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Onomea Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

Onomea Bay, Big Island, Hawaii
Enroute from Hilo towards the infamous Akaka Falls, we stopped to admire this amazing coastline and rocky shores known as Onomea Bay on the Big Island of Hawaii. Also known as the Hamakua Coast comprising parts of North Hilo and Hamakua on the flanks of the two dormant volcanoes – Mauna Kea and Kohala. Since the Hawaiian islands are a chain of volcanic mountains that are slowly moving through the Pacific Ocean in a northwesterly direction by means of plate tectonics, therefore the beaches and shores are rather rocky and sharp, always changing, always evolving. Mark Tawain described the islands as “the loveliest fleet of islands to sail in any ocean”. Streams, Cliffs, some beaches, and lush/verdant stream valleys dot this landscape. This is an area of high rainfall due to is windward location. Onomea Bay is a perfect place to see ocean and earth aggressively carving out the landscape. Over the millennia, forces of earth, sea, volcanic activity, earthquakes, and tsunamis have altered this landscape creating unique geological features along this coastline. One of which was the Onomea Arch which is no longer after destruction from an earthquake in 1956. This was a legendary arch where King Kamehameha threw his spear creating this huge tunnel in the rock. Now its just a wide crevice in the cliffs on the north side of Onomea Bay. Once there was a fishing village named Kahali’i along the bay, the remains of its old stone walls can be still found in the Hawaiian Botanical Gardens where the villagers once grew taro and sugar cane. This was also one of the first natural landing areas for ships as early as the 1800’s. It was a famous port for construction of the Onomea Sugar Mill and exportation of raw sugar. This valley along the bay also hosted a lilikoi or passion fruit farm, cattle farming, plantations, wild banana, mango, coconut, and guava tree farming. The area is amazing and hosts Akaka Falls, Hawaiian Botanical Gardens, as well as several other scenic points of interest.

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