Tag Archives: colorado springs

Country Buffet

Country Buffet
~ chain across the United States ~

Old Country Buffet has approximately 168 locations throughout the United States under the names of Country Buffet or Home Town Buffet. The mascot for the restaurants is the “O.C. Bee”. The restaurant chain is part of Ovation Brands, Inc. based in Texas as a subsidiary of Food Management Partners, Inc. They offer a steak-buffet, grilled-to-order steaks, single-serve dishes, scratch-made soups, entrees and desserts, beverage bars, buffets, chops and grilled seafood, international foods, and others. They can be found as Old Country Buffet, Country Buffet, HomeTown Buffet and Ryan’s Buffet.

I’ve visited many of these restaurants around the United States and they do not have many differences and their course selections are quite contrary the same. I’m a big fan of buffets, and this is mediocre yet tasty. Good prices for kids but a little higher end for adults. The selection is magnificent but it is your run of the mill home cooked selections with some international specialties to spice things up. Desserts are probably the better selections. Quick, fast, and will fill up your appetite.

Rated: 3 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Dinner with the family at Country Buffet – Tales of a Delivery Driver: Chronicle 278- Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken August 2, 2018. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=39039. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2018. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051

Share

Il Vicino Wood Oven Pizza

Il Vicino Wood Oven Pizza
~ Colorado Springs, Colorado * https://ilvicino.com/ ~

I have made numerous deliveries for this establishment in Colorado Springs and Denver. Every customer that received their orders were excited and almost drooling with anticipation to dig in, so I gather the food is spectacular. It smells it. I like the smell it leaves in my car and that’s usually not the case after a delivery. The staff is super friendly, attentive, and quick. They take special care to make sure the food looks perfect. I look forward to dining here someday. Rick Post, Tom White, and Greg Atkin are the founding three who built this mini empire that boasts 8 restaurants that can be found in Colorado, New Mexico, and Kansas. They blended together concepts from famous San Francisco hotspots with traditional wood-fire ovens that was learned from visiting traditional pizzerias in Italy with the highest quality ingredients in a casual upscale atmosphere.

They opened their first location in the infamous Nob Hill district of Albuquerque in 1992 and from there it was a whirlwind of growth.

Rated: UNRATED of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been visited and reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Red Gravy (Colorado Springs)

Red Gravy
~ 23 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 * http://redgravyco.com/ ~

I have yet to visit this wonderful artsy and comfortable restaurant for a dine-in, though have been through the doors many times for deliveries. Every customer i’ve delivered to are dedicated patrons, always enthusiastic about receiving the delivery. Obviously that tops the list for a visit some day when the finances are flowing as it is a littler higher end than my usual options of my own wallet’s accord. The staff is extremely friendly, prompt, and attentive. Dining ambiance appears relaxed and appetizing. Deemed an Italian kitchen, the menu selection for brunch, lunch, and dinner looks addictive – there is not an item on the menu i wouldn’t be interested in. I tried to find some history about the restaurant but the web site lacks an about us page.

Rated: unrated of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been rated. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

“The Dance” statue – Tejon street, Colorado Springs, Colorado

The Dance
~ Colorado Springs, Colorado ~

Downtown Colorado Springs is adorned with this spinning bronze sculpture of a dancing couple mounted on a wheel axis slowly turning around and around. It’s a charming piece for the downtown area. It is inscribed as “The Heart Has Reasons That Reason Does Not Know” and was created by artist James N Muir. It also proclaims “MARRIAGE IS A JOURNEY OF LOVE WHERE TWO SET OUT AND ARRIVE AS ONE”.

more information here.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

The Dance, By James Nathan Muir. Located on the Southwest corner of Colorado avenue and Tejon Street. Tales of a Delivery Driver: Chronicle 278- Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken August 2, 2018. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=39039. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2018. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051

Continue reading “The Dance” statue – Tejon street, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Share

The Lighted Lantern Statue, Tejon street, Colorado Springs

The Lighted Lantern
~ off 100th block of south Tejon street, Colorado Springs, Colorado ~

A beautifully sculptured statue along downtown Colorado Springs main drag – this sculpture was created by artist James N. Muir.
The artist describes that statue as a pioneer couple finding the courage within, balanced by the strength of their union holding aloft the lantern light of hope for a brave new world of freedom for all … the broken wagon wheel representing the end of one journey and the beginning of another carrying a Model 1876 Winchester the man standing on the book of truth … More can be found out
about the artist and statue here; http://www.jamesmuir.com/the-lighted-lantern-lifesize-bronze-sculpture.htm

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

The Lighted Lantern by artist James N. Muir, at the 100 block of South Tejon Street, just below Colorado Avenue.Tales of a Delivery Driver: Chronicle 278- Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken August 2, 2018. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=39039. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2018. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051

Continue reading The Lighted Lantern Statue, Tejon street, Colorado Springs

Share

East Coast Deli and Restaurant (Colorado Springs)

East Coast Deli and Restaurant
~ 24 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~ http://eastcoastdeli.net/

Right in the heart of downtown Colorado Springs is this nice quaint eatery that gives the feel of a NYC delicatessan offering soups, salads, deli sandwiches, burgers, lunch, and breakfast. They pride themselves as a New York Style Delicatessen & Restaurant. The owners Chris and Laura are from Long Island, N.Y. and have owned restaurants in New York, Las Vegas, and now Colorado Springs. Products and ingredients are shipped directly from New York and bake their breads in shop daily. Their soups are made from scratch and they roast their own meats and are open 7 days a week for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Rated: UNRATED of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Spiced Island Grill (Colorado Springs)

Spiced Island Grill
~ 10 N Sierra Madre St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~

A delicious treat of Jamaican food and spiced island gourmet that has a top rating in Colorado Springs. A little off-map location down by the park and railroad in downtown Colorado Springs. The restaurant began 20 years ago by owners Claudette and Glenroy Hutchinson vending at fairs, street markets, and festivals throughout the country from New England to Cambridge England, they travelled all over. The restaurant has a hide-a-way feel, nestled out of the city bustle yet in a downtown setting. It is believed by the owners that the building they occupy used to be a brothel that served gold miners and railroad workers in days past. The history is not documented, some shoes of brothel style were found in the crawlspace, and the building is called “El Tesoro” meaning “the treasure” of Sierra Madre Street. The building was converted into an adobe style restaurant in 1991.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Blank Canvas Cafe (Colorado Springs)

Blank Canvas Cafe
~ 103 S Wahsatch Ave #106, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 ~

A great little hole-in-the-wall restaurant and cafe off of Wahsatch avenue in downtown Colorado Springs. It appears to be a popular hangout and has great reviews. I unfortunately have not yet tried it out. They offer a unique assortment of teas, pastries, salads, paninis, sandwiches, and locally roasted coffee. They offer an artistic space for local artists and hand-made creations from the Studio as well as poetry readings, open mic night, comedy, music, and entertainment. The cafe is the vision of Dream Catchers and funded by Ariel Clinical Services.

Rated: Unrated of 5 stars. This establishment has not yet been reviewed. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Prospect Lake, Colorado Springs

Prospect Lake
~ 1605 E. Pikes Peak Avenue, Colorado Springs, Colorado ~

A beautiful water-sports popular swimming lake in the heart of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Popularized by the many offerings of Memorial Park and the YMCA Aquatic Center, this location is very popular with the locals for swimming, fishing, boating, water skiing, jet skiing, and water sports. The parks and amenities along its shores are very popular, including playgrounds, bath house, beaches, recreational trails, and picnic spots. There is also one wheelchair accessible fishing dock. Some boating requires licenses or permits, but both motorized and non-motorized boats may operate on the lake, including sail boats, canoes, row boats, and paddle boats some of which can be rented in the park. There is a 1.25 mile long fitness trail around the lake. At the official beach, which is roped in to protect swimmers from boating, offers a once a week opportunity to swim 6-8 pm saturdays beyond the ropes to the rest of the lake.

The lake is historic and man-made being originally built in 1890 as a reservoir for overflow irrigation water. It became a swimming lake in 1932. It was donated with land by General William Jackson Palmer along with other Colorado Springs parks upwards of 1270 acres to the City of Colorado Springs. Prospect Lake is part of Memorial Park. There is some dark history to the lake, including the fact that it has leaked massive amounts of water for over 50 years causing environmental issues for the city. This has raised much controversy as the lake has been drained in the past and contemplations of emptying it for good has been considered. The commission put together a $50,000 study to determine why it is leaking water. It is believed that the bentonite clay lining that was installed in 1953 on its bottom cracked when it was exposed and dried out in 2002 when it was purposely allow to dry up during the 2002 drought. Prior to that the lake had been annually pumped with potable water by Colorado Springs Utilities. The lake was refilled in 2003 with non-potable water and banned swimming that year. It is hypothesized that the water leaked through the cracks into an underground aquifer. leaking through the porous ground soil at the same pace throughout the years. Evaporation is also believed to be a major issue annually. The Parks office claims “it’s a birdbath with a crack in it”. The lake loses 392 acre feet or 128 million gallons of water every year, 54% through leakage and 46% by evaporation. 400 acre-feet of water costs the city $389,000. Theories state the city could drain the lake and install a bentonite liner over the other half of the bottom but that would cost several hundred thousands of dollars and would not solve the evaporation problem. Other solution would be the city building a well north of the lake in the aquifer that takes much of the seepage and pump the water back into the lake. They say “its just a major recreation area. We’ll put hundreds of thousands of dollars into ball fields … and when you think about Prospect Lake, it has that same kind of benefit” Richard Skorman, the Vice Mayor stated.

As for cleanliness, the lake has potable water pumped into it annually and they have drained and refilled the lake a few years back. In former years, it has been “sketchy” due to patrons, general neighborhood concerns, and cleanliness but many of those issues have been tackled in current years. City Health officials state that even though swimming pools are rigorously chlorinated and tested daily, outdoor swimming lakes and beaches are not. There is no way to chlorinate, check chemical quality, use a filtration system or check turbidity. Even with swimming pools, a 2010 national study states that 1 in 8 pool inspections led to an immediate closure due to code violations. Pools can be closed in minutes with on the hour testing. Some pool operators go above and beyond, such as the YMCA at Monument Park including emergency response plans to deal with any unexpected issues involving recreational water illnesses (RWI) that can cause diarrhea, gastrointestinal, ear, respiratory, eye and would infections often caused by cryptosporidium, giardia, shigella, norovirus, and E. coli. The YMCA operates several city-owned pools and water features including Monument Valley Pool, Portal Pool, Wilson Ranch Pool, and Prospect Lake Beach in Memorial Park. The YMCA follos state Department of Public Health and Environment’s guidelines for natural swimming areas and testing. The beach is tested 17 times during the summer, collecting bacteriological water quality samples at least once every seven days and no fewer than 5 times a month, collecting water-quality samples at least 24 hours prior to the beginning of a peak-use period and within 24 hours after the end of the same peak use period such as before and after Memorial Day weekend.

Note: The safety of the lake is questionable even though it has a city operated bath house, swimming beach, and is a popular recreation spot in Colorado Springs. According to the local hospital, the water is questionable. My son, on Sunday June 10th, 2018 cut his toe on something sharp in the water while swimming, resulting in 4 stitches. Please be careful swimming in these waters.

There was an article about Sunken Treasure that was revealed in the lake when it was drained showing finds such as a metal skeleton of a 1960’s Volkswagon Bug, shot guns, rifles, knives, class rings, ice cube trays, a 45 rpm record, empty pull-tab cans, and jewelry. A local prospector with his Bounty Hunter metal detector has found 14 shotguns, handguns, and rifles since 2002 many with their serial numbers filed off. The Bug is believed to have been driven onto the lake when frozen one winter that fell through the ice.

Bibliography:

Rated: 3 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Continue reading Prospect Lake, Colorado Springs

Share

Denny’s

Denny’s
~ Worldwide Franchise ~

Oh the memories growing up with “Denny’s”. It was a common hangout during my high school and college years. Late night, sitting for hours, catching up with friends. Even after college, it was a great location for after dancing/clubbing meet ups and place to sober up before heading home. This iconic table service diner-style restaurant chain is certainly an image of the American heartland and definition of American type food. It is called “Denny’s” or “Denny’s Diner” and consists of over 1,600 restaurants across the United States, including Guam, Puerto Rico, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Curacao, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Venezuela, Honduras, Japan, New Zealand, Qatar, the Phillipines, and the United Arab Emirates. It is famous for being open 24 hours, 7 days a week, year round except where required by law to be closed. They are open on holidays and late nights. They place themselves close to interstates, freeways, bars, and service areas.

A humble history spurring from a donut shop, Denny’s was birthed by Harold Butler and Richard Jezak as “Danny’s Donuts” in Lakewood California in 1953. In 1956, Jezak left the business leaving it to Butler who changed the image and concept from a donut shop to a coffee shop renamed “Danny’s coffee shops” operating 24 hours a day. By 1959 they changed their name to “Denny’s Coffee Shops” as another chain went by the name of “Coffee Dan’s” in Los Angeles. By 1961 they simplified their name to “Denny’s”. They became a franchise in 1963 and most of the locations today are franchise owned. In 1977 they introduced their very popular Grand Slam breakfast. By 1981 there were over 1,000 restaurants throughout the United States. They also absorbed many of the Sambo restaurants. By 1994 they became the largest corporate sponsor of “Save the Children” charity. Operating non-stop, 24 hours, many locations were built without locks and some are said to have lost their keys. With headquarters in La Mirada, California until 1989, they relocated to Irvine, California, then Spartanburg, South Carolina becoming acquired by Trans World Corporation in 1987.

They became notorious for the “free birthday meals” to anyone on their birthdates, but this only survived from 1990-1993 but was cut off due to over-use and abuse. They offer a free Birthday Build-Your-Own-Slam on a customer’s proven and tracked birth date. By 1994 they changed their theme, outlook, and decoration with a lighter color scheme. They were reviewed by the October 2004 Dateline NBC news story called “Dirty Dining” criticizing Denny’s cleanliness, safety, and operations pulling the health inspection records of over 100 of its establishments for a 15 month span totaling all of the critical violations that could lead to adverse effects of a customer’s health compared to Applebee’s, Bob Evans, Chili’s, IHOP, Outback, Red Lobster, Ruby Tuesday, TGI Friday’s, and Waffle House. They had the fewest violations averaging less than one violation per restaurant which they proudly boast is due to their successful model of their “principles of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points.”

However in 1934, they were damaged by their involvement in a series of discrimination lawsuits over food servers denying or providing inferior service to racial minorities from African Americans to Native Americans. That year, six black U.S. Secret Service agents visited a Denny’s in Annapolis, Maryland and were forced to wait an hour for service while their white companions were seated immediately. The 1994 class action lawsuit filed by black customers who were refused service, forced to wait longer, or pay more than white customers led to a $54.4 million settlement. In 1995 a African American customer in a Sacramento California location was told that he and his friends had to pay up front at the counter before ordering their meals, because, according to the waittress, said some black guys had been in earlier who made a scene and walked out without paying their bill, so the manager now wanted all blacks to pay up front. In 1997, six Asian American students from Syracuse University were discriminated upon late at night at a Denny’s having to wait more than a 1/2 hour as white patrons were served before them. After they complained to management, they were forced to leave by security, then afterwards a group of white men came out of Denny’s and attacked them, some beaten unconscious. Denny’s addressed this with racial sensitivity training programs for their employees and worked hard to improve public relations featuring African-Americans in their commercials. They made headway and was awarded in 2001 by Fortune Magazine to be the “Best Company for Minorities”. By 2006/2007 they topped Black Enterprise’s “Best 40 Companies for Diversity.” However in 2017, a Vancouver Denny’s made an Indigenous woman pay for her meal before it was served. The restaurant called the police on her after she left claiming she had a sharp-metal object in her pocket.

June of 2017, eight Denny’s in Colorado Springs and Pueblo, Colorado were immediately shut down because the franchise owner failed to pay close to $200,000 in back taxes as well as $30,000 in sales tax from the previous year. Many of these employees also filed that their accounts were not paid, received bounced checks and paychecks not arriving on time. The IRS came in and closed the locations, seizing property, and no advance notice given to its employees for the closures, leaving many without work or preparation for the losses. The franchise owner fled the state of Colorado.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Continue reading Denny’s

Share

Memorial Park (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Memorial Park – Prospect Lake
~ Memorial, 1605 E. Pikes Peak Ave. Colorado Springs, Colorado ((E. Pikes Peak and Hancock Aves) ~
~ https://coloradosprings.gov/parks/page/memorial-park ~

In the heart of Colorado Springs is a beautiful multi-use park offering outdoor recreations to all sports enthusiasts and a great place for outdoor family gatherings. It features tennis courts, recreational lake with swimming beach, multiple baseball fields, an aquatic center, bicycle velodrome, ice skating center, basketball courts, volleyball, and multi-use sports fields. For families it offers playground and picnic areas with reservation spaces available. The Park embraces much of the shores of Prospect Lake and features a 1.25 mile fitness trail around the lake for walking, jogging, and hiking. Prospect Lake also features fishing, swimming, boating, water skiing, and jet skiing space. The Skate Park is Colorado’s second largest skate park at 40,000 square feet with competition-size space features for inline skaters, skateboarders, and BMX bikers. There is no cost to use these facilities. Prospect Lake also has a official beach and bath house and two fishing areas with docks. The sports center has an administrative office, three baseball/softball fields, 15 football/soccer fields, 12 tennis courts, and the YMCA hosting an indoor poor, fitness room, social/play room, and swimming lessons. The park features tribute and memorials to soldiers, guards, and military service. There are also horseshoe courts, multi-play courts, three playgrounds, restrooms, public telephones, vending machines, concessions, three trails: prospect lake fitness trail 1.25 miles, criterium trail at .6 miles, and perimeter jogging trail at 2.2 miles.

Review – I am very impressed with this park and love the lake. However, the lake is very murky at times and according to the local hospital its cleanliness is questionable, although they offer a official swimming beach and areas. My son on 6/10/18 was swimming in the lake and cut his foot on something sharp on the bottom of the lake floor requiring 4 stitches, so please be careful and aware. The indoor swim center hosted by the YMCA is laden with rules, often shutting down / interrupting swim time for ‘safety breaks’ and have some outrageous restrictions in play. Not to mention use of the pool is very high priced and oriented towards wealthier clientele. The staff are not very friendly or positive, and the overall experience is just not enjoyable. We have not used the bath house as it is often closed leaving swimming beaches and use around other parts of the lake leading to more unsafe conditions.

Rated: 3.4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions visited last 6/10/18. ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Little Nepal (Colorado Springs)

Little Nepal Indian Restaurant
~ 1747 S 8th St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80905 | Phone: (719) 477-6997 | lnepal.com ~

One of Colorado Springs finest Indian restaurants who are notorious for their amazing buffets. Located off 8th street, traditional style and decor – friendly service worth the wait. Tibetan, Nepalese, and India cuisine. Delicious and spicy. Wide assortment of offerings. A must visit for any Indian food connoisseur …

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Wings 2 Go (Colorado Springs)

Wings 2 Go (Flatiron’s)
~ 2540 Tenderfoot Hill St,
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906 | Phone: (719) 576-2540 ~

Un-disclosed Wings to Go at the counter within Flat Irons restaurant, this service is featured primarily with Uber Eats. The rest of the restaurant is dine in hearty American grill fare featuring fish tacos, steak, and pizza. I have yet to try “Wings 2 go” but I’ve heard they are pretty good. Not yet reviewed.

Rated: ___ of 5 stars. Currently un-rated. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Urban Steam (Colorado Springs)

Urban Steam Coffee
~ 1025 S Sierra Madre St, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 | (719) 473-7832 | urbansteamcoffee.com ~

A off in the warehouse district, hiddem gem of a grunge style gear head hang-out. They offer drinks, cocktails, panini, creative waffles, salads, sandwiches, and of course coffee n’ espresso. WiFi … chill … and sometimes busy. Limited parking. Very laid back.

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Saigon Grill (Colorado Springs)


~ 337 N Circle Dr, Colorado Springs 80909, Colorado | saigongrillfortcollins.com | (719) 635-0720 ~

A unique family-owned roadside Vietnamese restaurant in eastern Colorado Springs offering Vietnamese food, wine, beer, and cuisine. I have yet to try the restaurant, but have done deliveries for them – they seem to be very popular and well liked. They are always friendly and hospitable with a cute playful kid managing the operation. They are said to have modern interpretations of classic dishes using the highest quality and fresh ingredients.

Rated: ___ of 5 stars. un-rated. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

Hacienda Villereal (Colorado Springs)

Hacienda Villereal
~ Colorado Springs, Colorado 80916 | Haciendavillarreal.com ~

A popular Mexican restaurant in Colorado Springs, I have yet to try the establishment but seems to be fantastically reviewed by its patrons. They call their cuisine “Mountain Mex” in like comparison to Tex-Mex, New Mex Mex, etc. They take Mexican food and give it a Rocky Mountain twist. A festive restaurant, colorful and exciting, embedded into a small strip mall. They have unique food and drinks, over 40 tequilas to choose from. Definitely on my lists of places to visit.

Rated: ___ of 5 stars. un-rated. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Share

IHOP Southgate (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

IHOP – Southgate
~ 2290 Southgate Rd, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906 ~ (719) 635-0777 ~

Out of the Colorado Springs locations, this International House of Pancakes is one of the best. Who doesn’t enjoy IHOP? Its a pancake house worth the wait that you’ll often be greeted with upon entering as IHOP has that reputation. Wide variety of pancakes and all-day breakfast selections, fresh fruit, and delicous fried goods. 24 hours of availability, it will satiate your appetite. Delivery is also fast and efficient. Friendly staff and good food.

Rating: 4 out of 5 ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Like this review? want more? consider donating a chai, coffee, tea, or meal to the reviewer as a way to say “thank you! I want more …”





Continue reading IHOP Southgate (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Share

Pho Brothers (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Pho Brothers
~ 1107 S Nevada Ave, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 – (719) 445-0760 ~

Just off Nevada Avenue, Pho Brothers is a small Vietnamese restaurant located within a mini strip mall. When you walk through their doors you escape the grime of the neighborhood, into a bustling fun ambiance with large screen entertainment. The staff is friendly and helpful. The food is divine. If you’re a fan of Pho, this is the place to go in Colorado Springs. I got the seafood pho and a thai tea bubble drink. It was delicious.

Rating: 5 stars out of 5 ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Like this review? want more? consider donating a chai, coffee, tea, or meal to the reviewer as a way to say “thank you! I want more …”





Continue reading Pho Brothers (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Share

Firehouse BBQ (Colorado Springs, Colorado) : Closed

Firehouse Southern Style BBQ
~ 817 W Colorado Ave, Colorado Springs, CO 80905 | (719) 447-8829. 2018 update: Location permanently Closed. ~

Oh the distinct Southern smells, charm, and culinary offerings – Firehouse BBQ was by far one of my favorite Barbecque shacks I’ve been to. Granted fully aware the cuisine is extremely unhealthy, fat inducing, and bad for the heart – nonetheless my childhood tastebuds were always pleased with the experience, body aside. If you’re willing to risk your body’s health, then this is one of the top places to get quality meats – chicken, pork, beef, with home-made sauces to satiate the hunger. Great location with ample parking, friendly staff, but service was slow and portion sizes were minimal (my body thanked that, but my hunger did not). It was a good farewell for me enjoying perhaps my last meal of this kind of food as I was soon moving to Australia and Europe. I had a good farewell tour. Apparently though after returning several years later this establishment had its own farewell and no longer exists. This review is but a historical tribute to the location.

Rating: 4 stars out of 5. Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions, March 4, 2011 ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Firehouse BBQ (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=36309), Old Colorado City, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA. The Great Walkabout: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?page_id=114. From Colorado Springs to Australia, Europe, and back. Photos taken March 4, 2011. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2011 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

Like this review? want more? consider donating a chai, coffee, tea, or meal to the reviewer as a way to say “thank you! I want more …”





Continue reading Firehouse BBQ (Colorado Springs, Colorado) : Closed

Share

Jack Quinn’s Irish Pub (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Jack Quinn’s Irish Pub
~ 21 S Tejon St, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 ~ (719) 385-0766 ~ https://jackquinnspub.com/ ~

Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

One of Colorado Springs’ landmark Irish pub locations with a very comfortable relaxed environment full of songs, traditional cuisine, dancing, and jigs. It is the central location where the local Irish meet, greet, and sing. Outside of being too crowded and not finding a seat, the establishment has never let me down for fun, frolick, and good times. Perfect place to meet friends and have fun. Great service, friendly staff, and all out great business. Rated: 5 stars out of 5 Visited 2/25/11.

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Birthday Celebration at Jack Quinn’s (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=36255) with the family: The Great Walkabout: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?page_id=114. From Colorado Springs to Australia, Europe, and back. Photos taken February 25, 2011. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2011 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

Like this review? want more? consider donating a chai, coffee, tea, or meal to the reviewer as a way to say “thank you! I want more …”





Continue reading Jack Quinn’s Irish Pub (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Share

China Doll (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

China Doll Restaurant
~ 3629 Star Ranch Rd, Colorado Springs, CO 80906 ~ (719) 579-8822 ~ doordash.com ~

Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

One of my favorite quick Chinese buffets in Colorado Springs, China Doll has a small buffet lunch-time weekdays with some of my favorite dishes. The price is right, the service is fabulous and friendly, and the food is good. What more could you ask? While a medium sized restaurant nestled in a strip mall, on the southwest side of town, it caters to the Army and Air Force the most, it is never too crowded or busy because of its remoteness – so guaranteed seating and not having to wait. I have yet to partake of the menu ordering experience but the buffet is great. Rating: 4 stars out of 5 (visited 1/29/18)

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Continue reading China Doll (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Share

Wild Ginger Restaurant (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Wild Ginger Thai Restaurant
~ 2628 W Colorado Ave, Colorado Springs, CO 80904 ~ (719) 634-5025 ~

Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions Visited 2/14/2011 ~

One of my favorite Thai restaurants in Colorado Springs and Old Colorado City. Nestled just near the border of Old Colorado City and Manitou Springs off West Colorado Avenue is a decent-sized family restaurant called “Wild Ginger”. The service is great, the ambiance golden, and the dishes remarkable. The spice is quite right when you ask for Thai spice, the authentic cuisine is a delicacy in the heart of the wild West. Back in 2010-2011 I would frequent this lovely establishment monthly and sometimes weekly. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5 (Visited for review 2/14/11)

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Wild Ginger (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=36099) – 02.14.11 : A Thai Valentines. The Great Walkabout: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?page_id=114. From Colorado Springs to Australia, Europe, and back. Photos taken February 14, 2011. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2011 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=34457

Continue reading Wild Ginger Restaurant (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Share

Viking Fair at the Viking Hall (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Viking Fair

Sons of Norway Viking Market 2017
~ 1045 Ford St, Colorado Springs, CO 80915
Phone: (719) 574-3717 ~ http://www.sonsofnorwaycs.com/ * https://www.facebook.com/events/331423757313378/ ~

Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

The Sons of Norway is a heritage and cultural group of Norway celebrating relationships between Nordic countries. They have a lodge called the Viking Hall or Fjellheim lodge in eastern Colorado Springs. Each year they put on a Viking Market hosting a bazaar and brunch. The community and members come together to share arts, crafts, lefse, handwork, collectibles, unique gifts, baked goods, and goods. The bazaar runs from 9 am until 2 pm, with a pancake breakfast around 9 am, and lunch around 11. They held raffles with gifts donated by the various vendors all as a fundraiser for the group. It was a great time. The Tree Leaves Oracle vended its Viking crafts, gifts, and selections of drinking horns, leather works, and goods. Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Tree Leaves Oracle booth at Viking Fair (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=33969) at the Viking Hall, Colorado Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken October 21, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051

Continue reading Viking Fair at the Viking Hall (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Share

America the Beautiful City Park, Colorado Springs, Colorado

America the Beautiful City Park, Colorado Springs, Colorado

“America the Beautiful” City Park
* 126 Cimino Drive, Colorado Springs, Colorado
Article by Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions, July 21, 2016 (original review 7/20/08)

Formerly Confluence Park, this 30 acre park was recreated and re-dedicated as “America the Beautiful” in 1992 as part of Colorado Springs Downtown Action Plan for assurance of the vitality of the downtown area. The Julie Penrose fountain was added in 2007 as a fabulous water park section with an slowly turning modern art piece in the center of a timed fountain that patrons can cool off in. The art piece reminds alot of people of the infamous “Stargate”. Its called the “Continuum”.

This beautiful park has become a weekly adventure for me and my son during the summer months for him to splash and play in the fountain waters. Lots of open grass fields for the kids to play,
an amazing kid’s playground very artistically done, and great recreational features such as picnic tables, benches, walkways, and restrooms. Rating 5 stars out of 5 (Visited 7/20/2008; 7/1/2017; 7/20/2017 – formerly rated 4 stars in 2008).

Cooling off in the 90+ degree fahrenheit days in Colorado Springs, Colorado. America the Beautiful City Park. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken July 1, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Interested in this review or story? have things to add? please comment below. Do you enjoy this article? if so, please consider buying the writer a chai, lunch, or help cover gas funds for covering these sites. Thomas Baurley is a work from home single father sharing his inspirations, treasures, findings, and travels. Tell him thank you if you like his work, Please donate. Need a new or updated review? contact him for more information.
Continue reading America the Beautiful City Park, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Share

Cheyenne Spring (Manitou)


Cheyenne Spring, Manitou Springs, Colorado, USA

Cheyenne Spring
908 Manitou Avenue, Manitou Springs, Colorado
http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3133 by Thomas Baurley

Located right on Manitou Avenue in downtown Manitou Springs, Colorado is a sweet tasting natural Artesian soda spring called Cheyenne Spring. This sweet tasting bubbly elixir is believed to be over 20,000 years old and healing for digestive issues and osteoporosis. Drinking water this old empowers the soul with the geology of the Earth and peps the spirit. It comes from aquifers located a mile below the earth’s surface. This is one of the 7 most popular springs in the area.

Most of the Springs of Manitou were known for their health benefits, especially with digestive systems. This was especially helpful to the tribes visiting the waters as their diets were rich with wild game, the meat of which was notable for acidic effects on the body when consumed. These mineral waters helped re-balance the stomach acids.

This magical spring of Manitou has added health benefits based on its mineral contents that are well known for helping with blood pressure, nerve transmission, muscle contractions, osteoporosis, the heart, bones, teeth, and blood coagulation. It is also good for helping release energy from food digestion, regulating fluids, and stimulating the kidneys to release toxins. Magically it is a blood, bone, and heart tonic. It’s year round temperature is approximately 49-55 degrees Fahrenheit.

Geology

The waters that create this spring are said to fissure up from a mile beneath the surface fed by aquifers created from rainwater and snow melt of Pikes Peak. When the water reaches these depths, they heat up from the Earth’s core, become mineralized, and flow up through fissures and cracks in the Ute Pass fault zone where they become carbonated within limestone caverns, to the surface where they are tapped as natural springs or wells.

History

This was one of the natural springs frequented by the Cheyenne, Arapahoe, Jicarilla Apache, and Ute Indians throughout history. It was held as a sacred site for healing, meditation, and peace. Plains and mountain tribes agreed to peace during their visits while frequenting the springs together. It was the white man to break the peace of the area.

Fur trappers, miners, and traders came to the area and discovered the magic waters. It became an area known for curative effects in treating tuberculosis. When the Europeans and white settlers came to the area, they pushed the tribes from this area. The spring became commercialized in the 1800s. During the 1870’s, this was one of three springs located in Soda Springs park: Navajo, Cheyenne, Shoshone, and Manitou Springs.

By 1872, the Town Company, owned by Manitou Springs founder Dr. William A. Bell and his friend General William J. Palmer built a rustic stick pagoda over it and created a park called Soda Springs Park on the spot. They made the first bottling plant that year with an associated bath house combining the waters with Navajo Springs to prosper from its magical health benefits.

By the 1890’s it was contained by the current sandstone spring house by the Manitou Mineral Water Company and bottled. The spring house was constructed of stone quarried from the Kenmuir Quarry where Red Rocks open space now sits just east of town. Within the spring house is a historic copper-clad, carbon dioxide gas collector settled in the center of the cistern which the water company boasted was the world’s first mechanism to capture natural gas emitting from the source and being able to re-introduce it during the bottling process for the production of the best naturally sparkling water on the market called “Manitou table water”.

As the region was commercialized, the park diminished in size and was taken over by businesses. It was flanked by Soda Springs and Navajo Springs. When the company collapsed, which many believe was caused by a curse placed by the Ute that no white business would every prosper from the springs, the font and housing fell into disrepair until restored by the Mineral Springs Foundation in 1990-1991.

The current public font was crafted by local sculpture artisan Paul Rogers in Bronze. In June of 2011, a coli form bacteria was found in the spring closing the spring until it was dealt with. It was cleaned and re-opened shortly after. It is one of the most popular springs visited in the area.


Cheyenne Spring, Manitou Springs, Colorado, USA

 

Cheyenne Spring is notable for its high Calcium, Chloride, Magnesium, Sodium, Sulfate, & Potassium content.  Calcium for bones, teeth, heart, blood coagulation, helps control blood pressure, heart disease, PMS, and osteoporosis. Chloride is an electrolyte helping with fluid balances. Magnesium is good for bone and tooth formation, vital for nerve conduction and muscle contractions, and aids energy release from foods. Sodium helps with blood pressure & regulates fluids.  Potassium also helps with blood pressure, nerve transmission, and muscle contractions. Stimulates the kidneys & releasing toxins.   Alkalinity:     2,439 mg/L
Calcium:           440 mg/L
Chloride:          240 mg/L
Copper:            0.08 mg/L
Flouride:          3.50 mg/L
Lithium:           .743 mg/L
Magnesium:      90 mg/L
Manganese:   1.50 mg/L
Potassium:         75 mg/L
Silica:                   40 mg/L
Sodium:             450 mg/L
Sulfate:              190 mg/L
Zinc                    .102 mg/L

~ manitoumineralsprings.com
Analysis: Hall Environmental Analysis, ACZ Laboratories,
Colorado Springs Utility Laboratory Services.

 

Map Link: http://www.findaspring.com/locations/north-america/usa/cheyenne-spring-manitou-springs-colorado-co-80829/

References and Additional Reading:

Continue reading Cheyenne Spring (Manitou)

Share

Garden of the Gods (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545)

Garden of the Gods
1805 N 30th Street (at Gateway Rd) * Manitou / Colorado Springs, Colorado * 719.634.6666 * http://www.gardenofgods.com/ * http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545
Originally first published May 9, 2009 by Thomas Baurley

Garden of the Gods is a unique natural geological park that is located in Colorado Springs and Manitou Springs … and is a Registered National Natural Landmark. It’s open from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. in the summer and 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. in the winter. The park boasts over a million visitors a year or more.

History and Mythology

Where the Great Plains grasslands meet the low-lying pinon-juniper woodlands of the American Southwest at the base of the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains a geological upheaval occurred along the Trans-Rocky Mountain Fault system creating these spectacular features over a million years ago. Horizontal ancient beds of sandstone, limestone, and conglomerates were pushed and tilted vertically when the tectonic plates pushed together. Glaciations, wind, and water erosion shaped the features over hundreds of thousands of years.

This geologic feature was seen as sacred grounds by the original inhabitants of the area, potentially visited and used for spirituality possibly over 3,000 years ago to present. As early as 1330 B.C.E. evidence of human occupation has been found from petroglyphs, fire rings, pottery, and stone tools have been left behind. The Ute Indians claim that their people always had lived where Garden of the Gods Park now stands and their people were created there and around Manitou.

The Kiowa, Apache, Shoshone, Pawnee, Cheyenne, and Arapaho also claim their peoples visited or lived here. It was known as a pivotal crossroads and meeting place for many indigenous peoples and nomadic tribes gathered together for peace. Rivaling tribes were said to even have laid down their weapons before entering the shadows of the sandstone features.

Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

Two sets of petroglyphs were found here – the first hidden in a crevice on the east side of South Gateway Rock depicting a circular shield-like figure divided into four parts with a rain cloud terrace image, a Thunderbird image, zigzag lines, and image of wheat or corn and a faint flower-like image with a dozen dots forming a semi-circle over its top which some experts said was done recently in the last 100 years copying Indian designs from a book. The other petroglyph is pecking in the rock discovered in the 1980’s and estimated to date to 1500 C.E. most likely an Ute Indian design potentially depicting a deer, a third of a buffalo head, and maybe a stone tool seemingly telling a story.

Alleged Native American legends of the site have been told, their authenticity unknown. Marion E. Gridley wrote in “Indian Legends of American Scenes” telling a tale about a great flood that covered all the mountains nearby Pikes Peak. As the waters receded, the Great Spirit petrified the carcasses of all animals killed by the flood into sandstone rolling them down into this valley as evidence of the Great Flood.

The second was written by Ford C. Frick saying “… in the nestling ales and on the grassy plains which lie at the foot of the Great White Mountain that points the way to heaven lived the Chosen People. Here they dwelt in happiness together. And above them on the summit of the Mighty Peak where stand the Western Gates of Heaven, dwelt the Manitou. And that the Chosen might know of his love the Manitou did stamp uon the Peak the image of his face that all might see and worship him … but one day as the storm clouds played about the Peak, the image of the Manitou was hid .. and down from the North swept a barbaric tribe of giants, taller than the spruce which grew upon the mountain side and so great that in their stamping strides they shook the earth. And with the invading host came gruesome beasts – unknown and awful in their mightiness – monstrous beasts that would devour the earth and tread it down … and as the invading hosts came on the Chosen Ones fell to the earth at the first gentle slope of mountain and prayed to Manitou to aid it. Then came to pass a wondrous miracle, the clouds broke away and sunshine smote the Peak and from the very summit, looking down, appeared the face of Manitou himself. And stern he looked upon the advancing host, and as he looked the giants and beasts turned to stone within their very steps … “

If this site was in Australia or Europe, it would be named castles and fortresses associated with Gods, Deities, Spirits, or Faeries.

Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

Westerners first discovered the features in 1859 by two surveyors who were here to build Old Colorado City. M.S. Beach, one of the surveyors thought it would be a great location for a beer garden. The other surveyor replied to him stating “A Beer Garden? Why this is fit place for the Gods to assemble. We will call it Garden of the Gods”. General William Jackson Palmer who was known for his contributions of building Colorado Springs convinced his colleague Charles Elliot Perkins to buy the 240 acres embracing the features. In 1909 his children donated the land to the city of Colorado Springs.

The original family that donated the land to the public required that it would always remain free, and that is what it remains today. Garden of the Gods stands as a great park for hiking, walking, bicycling, rock climbing, picnicking, special events, and weddings … The park has it all … protected as 1,387 scenic acres … and presents itself as a unique tourist / information center, with a theater and gift shop near the entrance. Within are 15 miles of trails ranging in various levels of difficulty from beginner to advance for hiking and exercise.
A historical video greets you at the welcome center and tells the tale that began in the 1870’s when the railroads carved westward, when General William Jackson Palmer founded the city of Colorado Springs and upon discovering this natural beauty, urged his friend Charles Elliott Perkins, the head of Burlington Railroad, to make his home where the park now stands. He lived there until he finished his railway from Chicago to Colorado Springs. His railroad project wasn’t a success and never made its destination in the springs.
His homestead eventually became his summer home in 1879. He purchased 480 acres and never actualized building on it, leaving the land in its natural state and for the public. When he died in 1907, he made arrangements for the land to be a public park, and this was enacted by his children in 1909 forever as the Garden of the Gods “where it shall remain free to the public, where no intoxicating liquors shall be manufactured, sold, or dispensed, where no building or structure shall be erected except those necessary to properly care for, protect, and maintain the area as a public park.” That is exactly what they’ve done …. and its a beautiful place to be.

Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

Continue reading Garden of the Gods (Colorado Springs, Colorado)

Share

Colorado Springs, Colorado

Strolling downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Colorado Springs
State of Colorado, USA
formerly Old Colorado City then Fountain Colony, Colorado
Article by Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie productions, written on 21 July 2017

The second largest city in the state of Colorado, following under Denver in populace, Colorado Springs often nicknamed “The Springs” is a municipal hub for government, military, education, religion, sports, and recreation. It is the heart of El Paso County and is located in Central Colorado on the eastern slopes of the Rockies, in the shadow of Cheyenne Mountain, NORAD, and Pike’s Peak. It is located along Fountain Creek as its main water source. The region of Colorado Springs is located within the high desert of the Southern Rocky Mountains bordering its west, with the high plains to the east, high desert lands to the south, and the Palmer Divide to the north. It is approximately 60 miles south of Denver – the Mile High City, of which it beats in elevation at 6,035 feet. It is home to the United States Olympic Committee and training center. Colorado Springs has a population of over a 1/2 million residents. It encompasses over 195 square miles.

The area that is now Colorado Springs, was once home to the Cheyenne, Arapaho, and Ute tribes of the first inhabitants of the Americas. Once Euro-American settlers populated the area, the lands here were included in the 1803 Louisiana purchase and the 1854 Kansas Territory records. The first settlement by Euro-Americans occured in 1859 and was part of the Jefferson Territory, at the Front Range confluence of Fountain and Camp Creeks during the Gold Rush plaguing the Pikes Peak region in the mid 1800’s. It became the capital of the Colorado Territory in 1861, but in 1862 the capital was moved to Denver. By 1871 the “Colorado Springs Company” established the towns of La Font (now known as Manitou Springs) and the Fountain Colony up and down stream of Old Colorado City (the foundation of Colorado Springs). The former “Fountain Colony” became “Colorado Springs”. At a later date, that which was “Fountain Colony” became Fountain, Colorado and that which was “Old Colorado City” became Colorado Springs. The Military camp and town of “Fort Carson” was built within the middle area between Fountain and Old Colorado City. These “annexations” occured primarily around the late 1800’s and included the creation and division of Seavey’s Addition, West Colorado Springs, East End, North End, and the Broadmoor suburb that hosted the Broadmoor Casino. By 1895 there were over four Mining exchanges and over 275 mining brokers running the city.

After the mining boom gaining attention to the city, the experimental scientist Nikola Tesla created a Tesla Experimental station here on Knob Hill from 1899-1901. The Airport was established in 1919, with the Alexander Airport towards the north end of the city opening in 1925. The current Colorado Springs Municipal Airport was established in 1927.

By the 1940’s Colorado Springs became a central hub for the military, first with the establishment of Peterson Air Force Base in 1942 during World War II. By the 1950’s it was the Cold War headquarters for the ADC Air Defense Command. Peterson Air Force base was reopened in 1951 as a US Air Force Base and by the 1970’s NORAD was built within Cheyenne Mountain. The city boomed again with the construction of colleges and Universities making it a place of learning with the acquisition of “University of Colorado: Colorado Springs”, “Pikes Peak Community College”, “Colorado College”, and “Colorado Technical University”. By the late 1970’s Colorado Springs became the U.S. Olympics training Center.

The region of Colorado Springs is located in a semi-arid climate zone gaining quickly changing weather patterns and temperature zones from the chinook winds that come down off the mountains during the winter, and drastic rapid warming in the summers. It is considered to be sunny year round at an average of 243 sunny days a year. It gets approximately 38 inches of snow a year, although the snow doesn’t stick around long. The region receives roughly 16-18 inches of rainfall a year. It is also a popular location for afternoon thunderstorms, even though they don’t always produce rain. It is one of the most active places in the United States for lightning strikes nad is one of the reasons Nikola Tesla selected it as a location for his lab studying electricity.

Colorado Springs has become a backdrop for many art projects, films, and books including but not limited to Stargate, Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman, War Games, Homicide Hunter, and the Prestige. In 2013 North Korea produced a propaganda film stating Colorado Springs as one of its four main targets for a missle strike.

This page is currently being updated and developed. Please check back frequently for more sites of interest, photos, reviews, and history.

Strolling downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken July 20, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Sights, Parks, Trails, Entertainment:

Interested in this review or story? have things to add? please comment below. Do you enjoy this article? if so, please consider buying the writer a chai, lunch, or help cover gas funds for covering these sites. Thomas Baurley is a work from home single father sharing his inspirations, treasures, findings, and travels. Tell him thank you if you like his work, Please donate. Need a new or updated review? contact him for more information.

Garden of the Gods (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=545). Tracing the Past – Exploring Manitou Springs (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=829) . The Great Walkabout: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?page_id=114. From Colorado Springs to Australia, Europe, and back. Photos taken January 22, 2011. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2011 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051. Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613


Continue reading Colorado Springs, Colorado

Share

Poor Richards (Colorado Springs, Co)

Poor Richards

Poor Richards
~ Colorado Springs, Colorado ~

Write up coming soon ….

Poor Richards ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29645) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Poor Richards ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29645) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Poor Richards ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=29645) – New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 23, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Share

7 Minute Spring (Manitou Springs, Colorado)

7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147)

Seven Minute Spring
~ Manitou Springs, Colorado ~

Article by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Research

The Seven Minute Spring was man-made and drilled in 1909 near the former Manitou House Hotel. The drilling hit a limestone cavity of ancient carbonated waters that created a geyser that would erupt every 7 minutes giving label to its current name. In 1920 the spring was owned by a curios and concessions that tried to cash in on it promoting “Mansions 7 Minute Spring” enclosed by a run-down shack. By the 1930’s new owners gave it a more rustic appearance by fencing it in with a rectangular log structure, although commercialized with trinkets, gifts, and curios as well as a miniature railroad that circled the property. By the 1940s, the property fell into disrepair, and saw a history of various attempts to restore the spring. It was turned into 7 Minute Spring Park by 1993. Local artisans Don Green, Maxine Green, and Bill Burgess created the fonts at the spring, the Pavillion, and tourist attraction for the site. The current gazebo is stylized to incorporate the design of the original 1880’s structure that once sheltered Ute Iron Spring, featuring an outdoor amphitheater, sculpture garden, and encasing the panoramic view of the mountains. The fonts for the spring was created by Bill Burgess, Don Green, and Maxine Green. The font through which visitors could fill up water bottles was designed by Don Green and is located within the building. Maxine Green designed the ceramic components of the two font designs.

    Mineral   Amount
    Alkalinity   1,310 mg/L
    Calcium   303 mg/L
    Chloride   96.4 mg/L
    Copper  
    Fluoride   .64 mg/L
    Iron   .54 mg/L
    Lithium   .277 mg/L
    Magnesium   82.6 mg/L
    Manganese  
    Potassium   19.5 mg/L
    Silica   22 mg/L
    Sodium   159 mg/L
    Sulfate   96.7 mg/L
    Zinc   .34 mg/L
    Total Dissolved Solids   1,560 mg/L

    Mineral spring comparison chart

The little touristy village of Manitou Springs is most famous for its mineral springs that well up through eight (previously 10, upwards of 50) fonts peppered throughout the town. These springs are free to visit and each holds its own variation of minerals, magic, folklore, and healing properties that visitors sought throughout the ages. Each has its unique flavor, natural carbonation, and effervescence. This valley was originally heavily frequented by various Native American tribes who visited fountain creek and its natural springs for its healing magic, offering homage and great respect to the spiritual powers that dwell here. They believed these magical springs were the gift of the Great Spirit Manitou, after which the town and valley was named from. They brought their sick here for healing. The aboriginal inhabitants and visitors of the area called the “Great Spirit” as “Manitou”, and felt these mineral springs was its breath, as the source of the bubbles in the spring water. This made the waters and grounds extremely sacred. The Ute, Arapaho, Cheyenne, and many other tribes came here to partake of the great spirit’s breath. They would heal their sick here, collect the waters, stay for winters, and share in the waters as a area of peace where no conflict was allowed. There was believed to have been 10 natural springs in the valley. The Euro-Americans caused conflicts and skirmishes with the Natives, pushing them out, so they could utilize the valley for business, resort, tourism, and commerce. It is said, after the Natives left, they cursed the area for the Whites that no business will ever succeed there. Ever since it has been an ever-changing valley with businesses coming and going, failing and closing, with new ones coming in and replacing those that left. One of the first white explorers to record the waters was Stephen Harriman Long in 1820. The expedition’s botanist and geologist Edwin James recorded in detail the healing nature of the waters. The explorer George Frederick Ruxton wrote in his travel about these “boiling waters” as well and that “… the basin of the spring was filled with beads and wampum, pieces of red cloth and knives, while the surrounding trees were hung with strips of deer skin, cloth, and moccosons”. This is a common practice to leave such similar objects, items, and cultural artifacts around the world at magical and healing springs, wells, and bodies of water.

Nearly 50 years later, Dr. William Abraham Bell and General William Jackson Palmer made plans to develop a health resort here during the Civil War with “a vision of dreamy summer villas nestled in the mountains with grand hotels and landscaped parks clustered around the springs” that they called “Fountain Colony” and “La Font”. It became Colorado’s first resort town. By 1871 white settlers came in and began developing the area for tourism, health care, and profit. A resort was soon developed here taking advantage of the waters and incorporating them into medicinal and healing water therapies. This brought great prosperity to the region. By 1873, a developer by the name of Henry McAllister who worked for Palmer, spread news about the medicinal benefits of the Springs and pushed for it to become a spa resort including “incomparable climate and scenery” as its backdrop.

Then came various medicinal practitioners, such as Doctor Edwin Solly who pushed the area as a resort for healing and therapy, preaching the combined waters to drink, soak in, and breath of the pure air mixed with the sunny climate would be the most effective prescription to treat tuberculosis. The commercial businesses began to lay claim to the various springs, enclosing some of them as the village grew. The first of which was the Cheyenne Spring House was established as a red sandstone bricked conical roofed structure. Over 50 wells and springs were drilled shortly after, many of which were enclosed. Once popularity disappeared and “dried up”, many of these springs were capped, paved over, and closed. However as the fad died, medical centers and hospitals around the United States improved, Manitou became forgotten and suffered abandonment. The Mineral Springs Foundation was formed in 1987 as an all-volunteer 501(c)3 non-profit to protect, improve, maintain, and manage the springs targeting to restore some of the springs and promote the popularity once again. They host walking tours called “Springabouts” every Saturday from Memorial Day to Labor Day, beginning in downtown, and can be arranged by visited the Tourist center or calling 719-685-5089. The visitor center will provide maps, brochures, detailed content charts, and sampling cups upon request. They can also be found at their website at http://www.manitoumineralsprings.org. The series of springs has been developed as a National Register of Historic Places district and is located in one of the country’s largest districts of its kind. It was originally called the “Saratoga of the West” and established as a resort community within a spectacular setting at the edge of the Rocky Mountains along the base of Pikes Peak. Numerous bottling companies moved into the are making profit on the waters, the most famous of which was “Manitou Springs water” and was sold globally.

Geology: The waters come from two original sources in the Rampart Range and Ute Pass, these “deep seated waters” travel through limestone caverns and drainage systems created by karst aquifers. The water dissolves the limestone and absorbs carbonic acid, carbon dioxide, and other minerals that make it “effervescent” or slightly naturally carbonated. It is heated by volcanic and inner core processes. Through time, the waters return to the surface naturally by means of an artesian process rising to the surface, collecting soda, minerals, and sodium bicarbonate upwards. The other source of the waters is from Fountain Creek and Williams Canyon, snow melt, rainwater, and surface waters. The warm water then flows up into a limestone cavern where it becomes carbonated and springs forth to the surface in natural as well as human drilled locations. Most of these waters take thousands of years to complete its voyage from the mountain snow-capped peaks down to inner earth and back up to the surface – freeing its content and solutions from being affected by industry, development, and atmospheric contamination.

    The Springs of Manitou:
    http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3203

  1. Cheyenne Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4921 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3133
    This natural sweet soda spring comes up from limestone aquifers and is believed to be over 20,000 years old.
  2. Iron Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3159
    The Iron spring is named after its harsh foul iron-tasting flavor and content. It was a man-made spring drilled in the 1800’s and prescribed to patients for iron deficiency.
  3. Lithia / Twin Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4881 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3163
    This is a combined location of two man-made drilled springs – Twin Springs and Lithia Springs. It is popular for its Lithium content and its sweet taste, calcium, lithium, and potassium content. Its popular to be mixed in lemonade.
  4. Navajo Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3127
    This spring is a natural soda spring over which commercial development was built. It is now within and beneath the popcorn and candy store. This was the most popular that was frequented by Native Americans and early Euro-American settlers and was the founding spring for the village. It originally fed a large bath house and bottling plant bringing fame to the town.
  5. Old Ute Chief Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3169
  6. Seven Minute Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147
    A man-made spring drilled in 1909 to enhance the neighboring hotel’s tourist attraction. Its unique carbonization caused it to erupt like a geyser every 7 minutes. It became dormant for many years until the 1990’s when it was re-drilled and the surrounding park was established.
  7. Shoshone Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3151
    This was a natural spring that hosted sulphur content and was prescribed by various physicians for curative powers before modern medicine became popular and effective.
  8. Soda Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3217
  9. Stratton Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4931 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3139
    This is a man-made drilled spring by the Stratton Foundation as a service to Manitou Springs village where tourists could come and partake of its waters, dedicated to early Native American Trails.
  10. Wheeler Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3155
    This is another man-made drilled spring that was donated to the city by settler Jerome Wheeler of the New York Macy’s who resided and banked in the town during the mining and railroad period. His former home is located where the current post office is today.

7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

Continue reading 7 Minute Spring (Manitou Springs, Colorado)

Share

The Magic and Minerals of Manitou Springs

7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147) .

The Magical Mineral springs of Manitou
~ 354 Manitou Ave, Manitou Springs, Colorado ~

Article by Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Research

The little touristy village of Manitou Springs is most famous for its mineral springs that well up through eight (previously 10, upwards of 50) fonts peppered throughout the town. These springs are free to visit and each holds its own variation of minerals, magic, folklore, and healing properties that visitors sought throughout the ages. Each has its unique flavor, natural carbonation, and effervescence. This valley was originally heavily frequented by various Native American tribes who visited fountain creek and its natural springs for its healing magic, offering homage and great respect to the spiritual powers that dwell here. They believed these magical springs were the gift of the Great Spirit Manitou, after which the town and valley was named from. They brought their sick here for healing. The aboriginal inhabitants and visitors of the area called the “Great Spirit” as “Manitou”, and felt these mineral springs was its breath, as the source of the bubbles in the spring water. This made the waters and grounds extremely sacred. The Ute, Arapaho, Cheyenne, and many other tribes came here to partake of the great spirit’s breath. They would heal their sick here, collect the waters, stay for winters, and share in the waters as a area of peace where no conflict was allowed. There was believed to have been 10 natural springs in the valley. The Euro-Americans caused conflicts and skirmishes with the Natives, pushing them out, so they could utilize the valley for business, resort, tourism, and commerce. It is said, after the Natives left, they cursed the area for the Whites that no business will ever succeed there. Ever since it has been an ever-changing valley with businesses coming and going, failing and closing, with new ones coming in and replacing those that left. One of the first white explorers to record the waters was Stephen Harriman Long in 1820. The expedition’s botanist and geologist Edwin James recorded in detail the healing nature of the waters. The explorer George Frederick Ruxton wrote in his travel about these “boiling waters” as well and that “… the basin of the spring was filled with beads and wampum, pieces of red cloth and knives, while the surrounding trees were hung with strips of deer skin, cloth, and moccosons”. This is a common practice to leave such similar objects, items, and cultural artifacts around the world at magical and healing springs, wells, and bodies of water.

Iron Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3159); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Iron Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3159)

Nearly 50 years later, Dr. William Abraham Bell and General William Jackson Palmer made plans to develop a health resort here during the Civil War with “a vision of dreamy summer villas nestled in the mountains with grand hotels and landscaped parks clustered around the springs” that they called “Fountain Colony” and “La Font”. It became Colorado’s first resort town. By 1871 white settlers came in and began developing the area for tourism, health care, and profit. A resort was soon developed here taking advantage of the waters and incorporating them into medicinal and healing water therapies. This brought great prosperity to the region. By 1873, a developer by the name of Henry McAllister who worked for Palmer, spread news about the medicinal benefits of the Springs and pushed for it to become a spa resort including “incomparable climate and scenery” as its backdrop.

Shoshone Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3151) Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Shoshone Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3151)

Then came various medicinal practitioners, such as Doctor Edwin Solly who pushed the area as a resort for healing and therapy, preaching the combined waters to drink, soak in, and breath of the pure air mixed with the sunny climate would be the most effective prescription to treat tuberculosis. The commercial businesses began to lay claim to the various springs, enclosing some of them as the village grew. The first of which was the Cheyenne Spring House was established as a red sandstone bricked conical roofed structure. Over 50 wells and springs were drilled shortly after, many of which were enclosed. Once popularity disappeared and “dried up”, many of these springs were capped, paved over, and closed. However as the fad died, medical centers and hospitals around the United States improved, Manitou became forgotten and suffered abandonment. The Mineral Springs Foundation was formed in 1987 as an all-volunteer 501(c)3 non-profit to protect, improve, maintain, and manage the springs targeting to restore some of the springs and promote the popularity once again. They host walking tours called “Springabouts” every Saturday from Memorial Day to Labor Day, beginning in downtown, and can be arranged by visited the Tourist center or calling 719-685-5089. The visitor center will provide maps, brochures, detailed content charts, and sampling cups upon request. They can also be found at their website at http://www.manitoumineralsprings.org. The series of springs has been developed as a National Register of Historic Places district and is located in one of the country’s largest districts of its kind. It was originally called the “Saratoga of the West” and established as a resort community within a spectacular setting at the edge of the Rocky Mountains along the base of Pikes Peak. Numerous bottling companies moved into the are making profit on the waters, the most famous of which was “Manitou Springs water” and was sold globally.

7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147)

Geology: The waters come from two original sources in the Rampart Range and Ute Pass, these “deep seated waters” travel through limestone caverns and drainage systems created by karst aquifers. The water dissolves the limestone and absorbs carbonic acid, carbon dioxide, and other minerals that make it “effervescent” or slightly naturally carbonated. It is heated by volcanic and inner core processes. Through time, the waters return to the surface naturally by means of an artesian process rising to the surface, collecting soda, minerals, and sodium bicarbonate upwards. The other source of the waters is from Fountain Creek and Williams Canyon, snow melt, rainwater, and surface waters. The warm water then flows up into a limestone cavern where it becomes carbonated and springs forth to the surface in natural as well as human drilled locations. Most of these waters take thousands of years to complete its voyage from the mountain snow-capped peaks down to inner earth and back up to the surface – freeing its content and solutions from being affected by industry, development, and atmospheric contamination.

Navajo Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3127), Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
Navajo Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3127)

    The Springs of Manitou:
    http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3203

  1. Cheyenne Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4921 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3133
    This natural sweet soda spring comes up from limestone aquifers and is believed to be over 20,000 years old.
  2. Iron Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3159
    The Iron spring is named after its harsh foul iron-tasting flavor and content. It was a man-made spring drilled in the 1800’s and prescribed to patients for iron deficiency.
  3. Lithia / Twin Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4881 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3163
    This is a combined location of two man-made drilled springs – Twin Springs and Lithia Springs. It is popular for its Lithium content and its sweet taste, calcium, lithium, and potassium content. Its popular to be mixed in lemonade.
  4. Navajo Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3127
    This spring is a natural soda spring over which commercial development was built. It is now within and beneath the popcorn and candy store. This was the most popular that was frequented by Native Americans and early Euro-American settlers and was the founding spring for the village. It originally fed a large bath house and bottling plant bringing fame to the town.
  5. Old Ute Chief Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3169
  6. Seven Minute Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147
    A man-made spring drilled in 1909 to enhance the neighboring hotel’s tourist attraction. Its unique carbonization caused it to erupt like a geyser every 7 minutes. It became dormant for many years until the 1990’s when it was re-drilled and the surrounding park was established.
  7. Shoshone Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3151
    This was a natural spring that hosted sulphur content and was prescribed by various physicians for curative powers before modern medicine became popular and effective.
  8. Soda Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3217
  9. Stratton Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=4931 or http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3139
    This is a man-made drilled spring by the Stratton Foundation as a service to Manitou Springs village where tourists could come and partake of its waters, dedicated to early Native American Trails.
  10. Wheeler Spring – http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3155
    This is another man-made drilled spring that was donated to the city by settler Jerome Wheeler of the New York Macy’s who resided and banked in the town during the mining and railroad period. His former home is located where the current post office is today.

7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.
7 Minute Spring (http://www.technogypsie.com/naiads/?p=3147); Explorations around Manitou Springs, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken December 18, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Manitou Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613; Colorado: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=22613.

Continue reading The Magic and Minerals of Manitou Springs

Share