Tag Archives: excavations

Seip Mound, Ohio

Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939).

Seip Earthworks
~ Chillicothe, Ohio ~

About fourteen miles away from Chillicothe, Ohio as part of the Hopewell Mound Complex as a large earthen work complex that has a low embankment forming a small circle and an irregular circle next to a square that make up a 121 acre site. Within this enclosure is a large elliptical mound and three smaller conjoined mounds, as well as several smaller mounds, and several structure outlines found within the excavations. The larger mound was originally 240 feet long, 160 feet wide, and 30 feet high. Visiting this site, you’ll see a portion of the reconstructed wall, a reconstructed mound, and a part of the original wall. Public parking is located at the front of the site, there is a porta-toilet, and picnic shelter with information signs located throughout the site. The site is open during daylight hours and is free.

This mound is considered one of the largest of the Hopewell Culture mounds in Ohio dating from 100 BCE to about 500 CE. It was built by Native Americans pre-contact. There is estimated that there was over 10,000 feet of embankment walls that once stood 10 feet in height. The site was originally excavated between 1925 and 1928 by the Ohio History Connection discovering a large variety of artifacts crafted from an assortment of exotic raw materials like copper and mica. The Mound is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is owned by the National Park Service.

Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder - New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit   http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography
Seip Mound, Ohio ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28939). Exploring the Moundbuilder – New Beginnings: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken November 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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6.17.10: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf: WPP: Day 13 – Last day of Excavations, The Collections, Newquay Beach


Greenbottom/Chacewater/Truro, Cornwall, England

It was depressing that today would be my last day of excavations at Saveok. I really wish I could have afforded and budgeted more time/funds to stay here longer. I had my last divine breakfast with Vanda and Paul … and as we were chatting to came to the subject of tall sailing ships. Turns out Vanda knows a guy who has a historic sailing ship that he doesn’t want to sell but is only using it for running wine between France and England. Wouldn’t it be cool if we could work out a deal to run Pirate Relief with his ship as a tax write-off for him? One can dream. I really enjoyed my time with Vanda and Paul … couldn’t recommend their Bed and Breakfast more. Vanda offered to drive me to the bus stop after the field day so left my bags in the sun room and tromped off across the fields to the site. Oh how I to miss this place. :: sigh :: I have a strong calling that I’m meant to work here … further … if not as a purpose/request in life. Who knows what the future will bring. Being an American I’m limited and the cost of travels in Europe certainly are twice the cost as it is home. :: sigh :: So the final day of excavating.

Jacqui pulled out the artifact collection and showed me the amazing finds. This is such a sacred place. This site is such an amazing piece of history for the Other People, it’s not funny. What Jacqui is uncovering and finding is important pieces in the history of magic and folklore in the U.K. This place sends shivers of excitement up and down my spine – its sooo ethereal. I wish I could find funding or an opportunity to apprentice with Jacqui. An amazing scholar with so much to share. If only I lived in the UK …

We resumed excavations on the Feather pits where we believe we’ve uncovered from the clay caps upwards of three more offering pits. Jacqui also chose some natural colored clays to send with me that I could use at the Three Wishes Faerie Festival to make some tribal body paints … if I find somewhere to get linseed oil before hitting the festival. Found some interesting pottery, ceramics, and metal items in the pit … but the clock struck four and it was time to unfortunately head off on to the next leg of my journey. I will miss Saveok dearly. I wandered back to the Bed and Breakfast where Vanda was awaiting me to shuttle me to the bus stop. I’ll miss them dearly as well. I caught the bus to Truro and hit the rail station to await my train to Par.

Me and Jacqui Wood excavating

Newquay, Cornwall, Britain
From Par I had to change trains to backtrack to Newquay. Apparently doing this train route is 5 minutes shorter than the bus route – which would have been a straight run with no stops. A bit of a layover. I did meet a father and daughter from Vancouver who were pretty intriguing. They had been cycling around Cornwall. I wish I could do that. Someday perhaps. The daughter recently moved to London from Vancouver. Onwards to Newquay – I got off the train to find a very touristy, party beach city. Surf-central. The map made the St. Christopher’s Inn (Surfer Hostel) look not far away – I suppose it would have been closer by foot if I hadn’t walked past it for a 1/2 mile with heavy backpacks and bags. I found it – it was above the Belushi’s bar. The staff was nice but very pirate-sque. Very party central. They gave me a full dorm room all to myself with a beautiful view of the beach. I could have been completely satisfied with just hanging in the room all night with that view. I decided though this would be my only chance to see Newquay. So I ventured out. The bar was too rowdy, 98% male and testosterone-pumped as they were watching the World Cup. Oh how I abhor sports. I went for some fish n’ chips for din-din and wandered down to the beach and piers. Water way too freezing cold for a swim which was very disappointing as it was so welcoming to the eyes. I contemplated clubbing, but settled back into the room to some cider n’ wifi … needed some rest and relaxation before Three Wishes Faerie Fest tomorrow and meeting Faerie Zoe at the Train Station on the Bodmin Moor …

Continue reading 6.17.10: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf: WPP: Day 13 – Last day of Excavations, The Collections, Newquay Beach

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06.16.10: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf: WPP: Day 12 – Saveok Tour, Goddess Quest, Swan Pits, Excavations, Vertigo


Another very pleasant night at the Polgwedhen B & B and awakening to an amazing breakfast that Vanda cooked. Full Cornish/English breakfast. Beans, Eggs, Sausage, Bacon, Tea, Juice, homemade bread with jam, yogurt, and granola – I was stuffed! I had some time to spare as I read some of Jacqui Wood’s “Cliff Dreamers” book – fabulous! I was also lured away to the lake at Polgweden for a quick stroll through the gardens and the lake. Then on to the Saveok Site, where Jacqui had a slide show presentation set up for me. After the show and some more touring of the site, Me and Jacqui excavated in the Open Swan Pits. We estimated that there were three pits in the units we were opening and right we were – we came upon the clay pit covering that is all too familiar for these kind of pits. We pedestaled it and worked our way down and around it. I’m hoping that we’ll get to its contents before I depart. In the afternoon, Jacqui’s brother-in-law Kif came by with the “Goddess Quest” award – a fine golden and bejeweled statue of the Goddess that was the prize given for a fundraiser Quest that Jacqui had set up in the past to promote her fantasy novel Cliff Dreamers“. The winners of this treasure had temporarily lent the trophy back to Kif and Jacqui for safekeeping. Turns out Kif creates custom hand-made guitars, and is the maker of guitars used by Johnny Depp and Antonio Esterban. [ www.kifguitars.com ] We had some very pleasant and educating chats, once again distracted from excavating. After excavations, I headed back to Polgwedhen. No one was around so decided to head off to Truro for dinner. Found a unique little club’esque bar called the “Vertigo“. Interesting and hip decor, live Indie band, and decent priced pub food (very small portions though). I had Shrimp, coos-coos, and a burger. By the time I headed home it was already dark … long walk down the 1/2 densely wooded driveway … kinda creepy. Retired pretty much as soon as I got home. It’s been a long day …

Continue reading 06.16.10: Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf: WPP: Day 12 – Saveok Tour, Goddess Quest, Swan Pits, Excavations, Vertigo

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Chron. of Sir Thomas Leaf: (TWPP): Day 10 – Excavations & Site Explorations, Truro, Cornish Countryside



Morning window view

Arising early in the small village of Chacewater, I awoke in my private room at the King’s Head Tavern – peering out the window and seeing a beautiful clear day. Been very lucky with the good weather that I’ve had on this trip so far. Afterall, it is the Islands and its supposed to rain alot in these parts. Good night’s sleep was had. The shared bathroom in the hallway was empty so I was able to get a shower with no fuss. That’s always a nice start to the day. I stumbled down to the tavern, and the innskeeper was awaiting my arrival as she had a spread of food offerings for me … I ordered up the English Breakfast which at least in Cornwall consists of Eggs, bacon, sausage, mushroom, fried tomato, toast, and beans. In addition I had Orange Juice, Tea, yogurt, and cereal. What a hearty and heart-smashing breakfast. I took the 20 minute walk back to Saveok Mill to start the day excavating the site with Jacqui. It was Cathy’s final day for excavating so we finished up the units where the mill flough was located that Cathy had been working on. We uncovered alot of pottery shards – mainly porcelain and chunks of white quartzite stone. Cathy had to return to Canada today so the priority before a site tour was to finish up her excavating. After Cathy left, Jacqui showed me some of the artifacts collected on the site through the years, gave me a fantastic site tour, and showed me where the demonstration / reconstruction areas were for her experimental archaeology projects. I was so impressed with the site. It possessed amazing energy and you could feel the energies of the people that once lived here. Closing one’s eyes you could imagine what life was like here throughout the ages. You could tell it was a very holy and sacred place. Based on my archaeological interests, I was most impressed with the swan-feathered offering pits, the potential temple, the purification pools, and the ritual areas. I knew immediately that someday I would like to work here full time. After a good day of excavating, chatting, touring, and exploring the site – time spun by and it was already past our time. Jacqui guided me through the hole in the stone wall that was cut to the adjoining property where Vanda and Paul have their Bed and Breakfast – The Polgwedhen Farm. Nice short walk across the scenic Cornish countryside. The dynamics of land ownership, lords, tenancy, tithing, annual rents, and lifeways in these parts are more than fascinating. I settled into my very nice room and decided to head into Truro to search out an internet connection and food. Vanda gave me a lift to the bus stop – but silly me, I didn’t exactly note the driveway back to the B & B. While in Truro I found most pubs and restaurants stopped serving food by 5 pm. I was pretty shocked. I did find a Yak & Yeti Indian restaurant – and settled into a Lamb Masala dish. It was pretty delicious. Pitstopped into the Italian tapas bar where they had some free internet. The chap running the tapas was really nice. Had a couple of vodka n’ tonics while doing wifi. Missed the next to last bus back to Greenbottom, so took the later one – and sure enough – it was pitch black. Tromping down mile+ long driveways in the pitch black, thinking of Bodmin Beasts and mischievious Cornish Pixies and goblins crept into my mind’s eye. After trying several long driveways that didn’t lead back to the B&B, I stumbled at trying to call Vanda, with no luck, since I’m still a fool at dialing European numbers. Luckily Vanda was concerned with me not being able to find my way back and drove around looking for me. That was amazingly sweet. (Thank you!) I had tea with them to discuss the day’s activities as a nightcap and off to la-la land. Sweet dreams and amazing adventures ….


Cornish English Breakfast @ The Kingshead Tavern

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06.13.10 – Chronicles: WPP: Day 9 – Cornwall Country – Taxicabs, Trains, and Iron Age Roundhouses …



Iron Age Roundhouses at Saveok Mill

Early to rise with a train to catch at 8 am, I realized last night I would have a dilemma with getting to the Train Station in time because of the remote nature of Castle Horneck. The bus system on a Sunday in Penzance was not running as early as I needed, not to mention that the Castle was over a mile from the nearest bus stop and I was overburdened with a 17 kilo large frame backpack on my back with a 22 kilo napsack at my side. So I broke down on my ‘tight’ budget to arrange a cab for the morning. The cost wasn’t too bad and well worth every pound (GBP). As the cabbie dropped me off at the Penzance Rail Station, I oddly noticed that the station had yet to open. No stress though for within 5 minutes the gates to the tracks were opened by an agent. A pleasant rail ride to Truro viewing over the beautiful Cornish countryside. Once in Truro, I hopped bus 26 to backtrack through Three Milestone and on to Green Bottom. It was a good thing I had Google Earth’d the entire journey in case I had to walk from Truro and observed the photo shots along the route because the bus driver was unfamiliar with the stop I needed to get off on. I pointed it out to him and started to follow the route down the road, off a side track, through the bush, and across the tracks. Before crossing the tracks on foot there was a phone in which to call the conductor to make sure it was safe to cross. It was, but nonetheless, I hurried across the tracks. Following the overgrown path on up to the fieldhouse, I met one of the other crew members who guided me to Jacqui the Director of Saveok Mill Archaeological Site.

I came to discover this remarkable site as I had become intriqued by the article published by Archaeology Magazine on the Excavation of the Cornwall Witches. Since my Master’s Thesis and dissertation was on Modern Day Witchcraft, and I was very interested in the subject archaeologically, the opportunity to see actual Archaeological Evidence of Cornish Witchcraft was a very exciting thought. I made arrangements with Jacqui to come visit. I Originally intended on going in April, I wound up postponing and re-scheduling it for June as I was unsure what the funding situation would be with the archaeological lab I work for as we were threatened with layoff cutbacks. What I read about Jacqui was fascinating as well. I was very excited about this chance to meet her. Jacqui was an amazingly knowledgeable experimental archaeologist that radiated everything I read about her … It wouldn’t be hard to believe if she was currently the world’s foremost authority on Prehistoric Cooking, one of the lead’s for the world in Experimental Archaeology, and the creator of the first replica of the Orkney Hood in Britain and the Grass cloak for the Ice Man museum in Bolzano Italy. I was extremely excited for this opportunity to learn from her and see first hand her discoveries in her own backyard. Since my dissertion and thesis in graduate school was on modern day Witchcraft, I knew this site would give me some historical substance for my own independent research. Little did I know that I would also be learning how to make a Iron Age round house. Her local crew consisted of local students and Cornwall residents who were obviously very interested in her research and methodology. They all had great things to add and a pretty knowledgable assortment of folk. We spent the day building the round house by putting up the rafters and posts. In the afternoon we were disrupted by a bit of rain, the first I’ve seen of moisture in the skies since I arrived in England a few days ago. We moved our embracing discussions into the lab where we all got to know each other better. At the end of the field day, it was time to go check into my temporary lodging at the King’s Head Pub in Chacewater as the Bed and Breakfast I would be staying at for the rest of the week did not have a room ready for me until tomorrow eve. The walk wasn’t bad, within 20 minutes I was down in the neighboring village to Greenbottom called Chacewater. The room was nice and the staff friendly. The pub was filled with enthusiasts for the World Cup. Since watching sports on television absolutely bores me, as I’d be more entertained watching paint dry, I took a walk-about through the village in search of an ATM. Little did I know that my American VISA (debit) card did not have a ‘CHIP’ in it, so was completely useless at all other establishments I wandered into except for the pub where I was staying. There was also no business open with an ATM. So I couldn’t get any food from the grocery store. Breaking the budget once again, I retired to the Pub for a Shrimp dish and a vodka tonic to cut the edge. I retired pretty early to my room as there was no internet or wireless to be found in Chacewater that I could connect to. I had a feeling I would not have internet access during my field session here.


The railroad tracks

Continue reading 06.13.10 – Chronicles: WPP: Day 9 – Cornwall Country – Taxicabs, Trains, and Iron Age Roundhouses …

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The Harbour Temple at the Xanten Archaeological Park (Germany)

The Harbour Temple (Colonia Upia Traiana)
LVR-Archaeological Park Xanten / LVR-RmerMuseum
* Trajanstrae 4, 46509 Xanten, Germany * Phone: +49 (0) 28 01 / 712 0 * apx@lvr.de * http://www.apx.de/english/archaeologicalpark/rec_buildings/harbour+temple.htm

In the Archaeologie Park resides a partially reconstructed ruins of an ancient Roman temple of which is unknown which God/dess(es) were worshipped. It stands tall with columns and partially reconstructed walls to give the visitors an idea of the size of the monument and what it may have looked like. Climbing downstairs, the originally walls and structure can be found and protected from the elements as was left after excavation. Interpretive signs in German surround the inside of the basement to explain the temple. It is named “the Harbour temple”, which is probably the most phenomenal structure on the Park’s grounds. Easy to see from a distance, towering as a high-profile landmark of Roman culture far above the city walls, clearly visible from ships approaching the Colonia Ulpia Triana on the river Rhine. The temple was the second-largest in the city after the Capital and is similar to most Roman temple designs. It would have been dedicated to a deity but research has not revealed the identity of this God/dess. It was given the name of “Harbour Temple” during the excavations on account of its proximity to the harbour. There are several parts of the temple reconstructed on a three metre high podium. Several full-sized pillars were reconstructed with roof beam fitted to give some impression of the effect created by this magnificent edifice of a total height of 27 meters. Details of the Temple reproduced on the basis of innumerable fragments found during the excavations. One of the pillars has been painted in colour to illustrate the temple’s originally magnificent colouring. Wide and thin steps lead up to the temple’s podium and its cella where the ritual acts took place. In the Roman times, only a select group of people could enter the temple, ordinary mortals were not allowed. The foundation plate of the temple and its innumerable fragments were discovered during the excavations in 1977, many of which are on exhibit in the Museum. You can view the foundation through the back of the temple, for the reconstructed building stands over it like a protective shield.
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The Roman Baths at Xanten (Germany)


The Town Baths

The Town Baths of Xanten, Germany (Colonia Upia Traiana)
LVR-Archaeological Park Xanten / LVR-RmerMuseum
* Trajanstrae 4, 46509 Xanten, Germany * Phone: +49 (0) 28 01 / 712 0 * apx@lvr.de * http://www.apx.de/english/roemermuseum/largebaths/

In the heart of the Roman Museum at Xanten’s notorious Archaeological Park lies the ancient Town Baths of Colonia Ulpia Traiana. The monumental size and stature of the bath houses resembled a palace in many ways. These baths were constructed in AD 125 during the reign of the Emperor Hadrian. They manifest the Roman bathing culture in the province of Lower Germany. The well preserved remains of the foundation walls, pools, heating ducts and fireplaces are housed by a modern architecture masterpiece that serves as a protective building whose outer shape reflects the fascinating dimensions of the original remains from the rain and sun while keeping the impressive dimensions of the Roman architecture. The layout of the floor permits a fairly accurate reconstruction of the bath’s architecture – seen from outside, the different roof designs of the building give an impression of the bath’s complex construction. Within, the modern steel structures visualize the imposing dimensions of the rooms. Red steel girders mark the former position of columns, walls and arches. Visitors who first took a look at the reconstructed Hostel Baths can even better imagine the grand effect of the larger Town Baths. The Town Baths were far more than a place for relaxation and personal hygiene. This is where the Romans met with neighbours and friends, exchanged news, cut deals and sometimes also made political decisions. The baths were the city’s meeting point and social centre. The bathing wing was the heart of a big complex close to the city centre. Arcades with rows of stores, latrines, a water tower and a huge entrance hall were grouped around a wide courtyard. The complex provided everything the Romans needed to relax body and soul. The new RmerMuseum sits on the foundation walls of the former entrance hall. In an area of 11.500 square meters there was the main building, which included a multi-purpose hall, cold, lukewarm, and warm baths, as well as sweating rooms, an open-air area for sporting activities, and auxiliary buildings with toilets. The baths were discovered in 1879 and almost completely excavated by 1993. In order to protect the ancient fabric, in 1997/1998 the steel and glass construction were erected. The baths were located in big, magnificently decorated rooms with floors/walls cald with marble and the pillars and external facade elaborately designed. [abstracted from the apx website, brochure, and signs ]
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RomerMuseum (Xanten, Germany)


Romer Museum (Roman Museum)


LVR-Archaeological Park Xanten / LVR-RmerMuseum
* Trajanstrae 4, 46509 Xanten, Germany * Phone: +49 (0) 28 01 / 712 0 * apx@lvr.de * http://www.apx.de/
* Adults: EUR 5.00 * Children (over the age of six): EUR 2.50 * Disabled people: EUR 4.00 * Students, apprentices: EUR 4.00


The Museum is on site within the LVR-Archaeological Park Xanten which resides on the site of the ancient Roman city of Colonia Ulpia Traiana. Xanten is Germany’s biggest archaeological open-air museum and is a unique combination of an archaeological protective building and modern museum architecture which is inspired by the large entrance hall of the Roman baths with the ecological standards of the Rhineland Regional Council into consideration. Keeping with the feats of the Roman masters who were known for their monumental architecture, the founders of the museum kept with the magnitude to provide a direct impression of their spectacular impact. Reflecting the dimensions of the Roman Basilica thermarum, the entrance hall of Roman baths, both inside and outside. The entrance hall was the biggest room of the baths and at the same time one of the largest buildings of the entire Colonia. It stood 25 metres tall on a surface area of some 70 x 22 metres. Vertical glass elements permit interesting insights and lovely views inside and outside of the museum. The Museum is constructed of 14 steel frames weighing 35 tons each that rest on the Roman foundation walls to support the entire museum building. The facade consists of vertical panels and windows that let in lots of pleasant daylight and offer scenic views of the Lower Rhine area. The museum’s facade and its red gabled tin roof seamlessly merge with the architecture of the Protective Building. Just like its ancient predecessor, the building has no continuous floors but reveals the imposing height of the antique interior. The exhibition starts on the ground floor from where a system of ramps and platforms takes visitors to the upper levels. In the basement, a 70 metres long and five metres high stretch of the Roman foundation wall has been preserved. The complex contains 36 geothermal probes and two heat pumps that ensure environmentally friendly air conditioning and heating all year round. The Museum presents the 400 year history of the area in vivid and eloquent detail, with a chronological structure in presentation of the artifacts and historie. One of the most fabulously crafted Archaeological museums in the world. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.


The Boy of Luttingen (Bronze)
served to carry trays and was probably installed in one of the legate palaces of Vetera I.

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