Tag Archives: islands

Eighteen Mile Island, Columbia River, Oregon

18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095)

18 Mile IslandBR>~ Mosier, Oregon ~

Originally called “Chicken Charlie’s Island”, this little island is a scenic wonder along the Columbia River that is nearly 10 acre large island on the Oregon side of the Columbia River. It can be seen from Interstate Highway, milepost 174. It is located approximately a half mile from Mosier, Oregon. It is believed to have hosted a chicken ranch on int in 1904 owned by the Reither family. In 1915 it was inhabited by Charles Reither who lived on it until his death in 1963. It is a privately owned small rocky island that hosts navigational lights and was an island referenced by Meriwether Lewis during the Lewis and Clark expedition. It is pretty rocky, barren and remote. It hosts douglas firs, willows, wildflowers, cherry, blackberry, and a little sandy beach. There is a three story wood frame house on it that was privately built in 1969. It was later renamed “Eighteenmile Island” by the USGS in 1934. In 2007 the island and house was for sale to the amount of 1.4 million. Great views of the island can be seen from the Mosier Twin Tunnels hiking trail along the Historic Columbia River Highway.

18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409
18 Mile Island ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25095); Mosier Twin Tunnels ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25083); Historic Columbia River Highway ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25089); Mosier, Oregon ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25077). January 17, 2016. Chronicles 22: Life in the Gorge/Columbia River. November-December 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=17409

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Niagara River

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Niagara River

A massive river that flows between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie for approximately 35 miles in length. It is home to the famous “Niagara Falls” both on the U.S. and Canadian sides. It is dotted with falls, whirlpools, and rapids along its course. There are also several islands along the run of the river: The two largest and most popular are the Navy Island and the Grand Island. Other popular ones include Goat Island, Luna Island, and Squaw Island. The river forms the border between Ontario, Canada and New York, USA. Many legends amiss around the river, as does its name origin. An Iroquois belief is it was named after a branch of the Neutral Confederacy called the “Niagagarega” in the late 17th century. Others state it was named after the Iroquois village “Ongniaahra” or “point of land cut in two”. Today the river is dotted with, especially within the Falls area, hydroelectric power stations. The two most famous of which is the Sir Adam Beck Hydro-electric Power Station in Canada and the Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant in the U.S.A. It was America’s first waterway to harness large scale hydro-electricity. Ships coming down the Niagara River use the Welland Canal of the Saint Lawrence Seaway to bypass the Falls. The Falls drop over 325 feet along its gorge fallway. It has two tributaries – the Welland River and Tonawanda Creek which were adapted into Canals for ship traffic such as the Erie Canal and the Welland Canal. The first European exploits of the area begin in the 17th century with French explorer Father Louis Hennepin published in the 1698 “A New Discovery of a Vast Country in America”. Some of the first railways built in America were built along this river, including the inclined wooden tramway built by John Montresor in 1764 called “The Cradles” and “The Old Lewiston Incline”. The River has seen its share of battles and wars, including ones between Fort Niagara (U.S.) and Ft. George (Canada) during the French and Indian War, American Revolution, Battle of Queenston Heights, and War of 1812. It was also very important during the American Civil War as a point where slaves crossed via the Underground Railway to Canada.

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Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge

Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge:
Ballintoy, County Antrim, Northern Ireland
One of the attractions along Northern Ireland’s Coastal Causeway that is part of the Giant’s Causeway highlights of the area, is a pedestrian suspension rope bridge that connects the mainland to the tiny Carrick island (rock) off the coast. It can’t be seen from the parking lot, and you pretty much have to pay admission to get down over to even peek a view (unless wandering over by boat), The National Trust charges 4-5 pounds to cross the bridge (or see it). The site is approximately 20 meters wide, and sits 30 meters atop from the rocks below. Bridge is open year round. The term “Carrick-a-rede” means “rock in the road”, and is theorized to have been erected by salmon fishermen in the area for over 350 years.
The island is no longer used by salmon fishermen as the stock has dried up at this point. Good views of what looks like a mermaid cove with underneath large caves, and unique flora, fauna, and geology. The caves were once used by boat builders and for a shelter during storms.

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Jamestown Island, Jamestown, Virginia

Jamestown Island / Jamestown National Park (Jamestown, Virginia)


first views of settling America
waterways of Colonial Jamestown Island, Virginia

Upon exiting Jamestown Historical Site visitors are presented with an option to explore the remainder of the island, and to take the 3 or 5 mile driving tour around the loop following the higher ground of the island. Planted every 1/4-1/2 mile usually is a marker telling the tale of the island outside of the Jamestown settlement. You’ll pass the site of a Confederate fort, through the Pitch and Tar Swamp, At the point of the island is a small hiking trail that leads to the Black Point that hosts white sand, marsh, pine trees, swamps, and beautiful views. The island formed many thousands of years ago, from a series of shoals along the James River. The Colonists arrived in 1607 to find an isthmus that connected the island to the mainland as well as a “paradise” of virgin hardwoods suitable for building their settlement. Unfortunately in the 1800’s, the isthmus eroded away and the forests cleared for farming. After Jamestown moved to Williamsburg, the island became a plantation run by the Ambler and Travis families. During the Civil War, confederate forts guarded the river channel. Today its in the hands of the National Park service where it has been healed and is regenerating. I quite enjoyed the peaceful drive and walk about the area. Rating: 3 stars out of 5. Visited 5/21/08.


driving map route of Historic Jamestowne Island, Virginia


Black Point, Jamestowne Island, Virginia

pathway to Black Point


“Bricks and Tiles”

The colonists at Jamestown produced most of their own brick and tile locally at each building site. Bricks were used for houses, wells, and walkways, tiles for floors and roofs. Three kilns have been excavated at Jamestown, each producing bricks of unique size and shape. Bricks also varied in hardness and color with the clay used and the length of time they were fired. Such differences can help date archaeological remains to a time a kiln was active.

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