Tag Archives: monuments

American Stonehenge (Maryhill, Washington)

American Stonehenge
Maryhill, Washington * Contact: Maryhill Museum of Art * 35 Maryhill Museum Drive * Goldendale, Washington 98620 * 509-773-3733 *
by Thomas Baurley

America has several Stonehenges – replicas of the infamous original from the British Isles. The American Stonehenge at Maryhill is one of the most popular sitting atop a lonely bluff overlooking the town of Maryhill, Washington and the length of the Columbia River. It is a full-size identical replica astronomically aligned of the ancient monument of “Stonehenge” in England. It serves as a replica for those who died in World War I and was built by the road engineer, Sam Hill from 1918-1930. It took him 12 years to perfect the monument, dedicating it on July 4, 1918 and completing it in 1929. He passed away shortly after its completion and was buried at the base of bluff below the monument in a difficult to reach location so that he’d be left alone by the tourists he expected to come see his monument. Hill originally built the monument after being mistakenly informed that the original Stonehenge was used for sacrifice. He wanted to symbolize how humanity was still being sacrificed to the God of War. His monument can be seen ominously looming on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River and easily seen by all passerby’s on U.S. Highway 97.

    The dedication plague at the monument reads:
    “In memory of the soldiers of Klickitat County who gave their lives in defense of their country. This monument is erected in the hope that others inspired by the example of their valor and their heroism may share in that love of liberty and burn with that fire of patriotism which death can alone quench.”

Sam Hill also built a mansion nearby that hosts the Maryhill Museum of Art holding monuments of the Klickitat County soldiers who died in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is also the very first monument in the United States to be constructed to honor the dead of World War I. The altar stone is aligned with the sunrise on the Summer Solstice. There is no admission to the Memorial.

American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington.  11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/  American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629 Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151
American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington. 11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629
Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151

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Statue of Christopher Columbus (Columbia, South Carolina)

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Statue of Christopher Columbus
* 312 Laurel Street * Columbia, SC 29201 *

Created by American sculptors Stavros Alexander Chrysostomides (1923-2007) and Estelle Hampton Frierson with funding by the South Carolina State Society Daughters of the American Revolution as a gift to the city of Columbia, South Carolina. It is a full length figure of explorer Christopher Columbus, wearing slippers, a skirt, and decorative shirt with a wool-like collar, decorative wrist and sleeve bands, on a calf-length coat facing the city of Columbia atop a rectangular base. Upon the base is the inscription: “CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS: 1451-1506. A gift to Columbia, this monument stands in tribute to the courageous spirit of that Genoese mariner who challenged the unknown to discover this land, … the hope of the world and the … of freedom for all.”

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“USC 3-D @ Three Rivers” ~ Columbia, South Carolina

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USC 3-D @ Three Rivers
* Rachel Palmer – “Welcome Home” * South Riverfront Park Address : 312 Laurel Street, Columbia, SC * North Riverfront Park Address : 4210 River Drive, Columbia, SC *

A great little statue/monument that sits near the Christopher Columbus statue at the Columbia Canal in the Riverfront Park. Shows sedimentary layers of the rivers with deposits and artifacts. Beautifully sculpted and presented. A great piece for any geologist, archaeologist, or history buff. Rating: 4 stars out of 5.

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Stone of Hope (5 Points – Columbia, South Carolina)

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Stone of Hope
* Five Points * Columbia, South Carolina * N 34 00.047 W 081 00.899 * 17S E 498616 N 3762242 *

Just on the edge of Five Points center, right down Greene street from the Post Office, is a unique stone carved as a globe atop a UN-capped pyramid as a memorial to Martin Luther King. The stone looks like it could be representing the “all seeing” eye. The fountain is circular. A stone before it is carved with part of his “I have a dream” speech. Some say the park from Google Earth looks like the tail of a snake with this monument at its tail, and some think this could represent the ouroboris. This monument description stone quotes MLK’s speech “I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted every hill and mountain shall be made low. The rough places will be made plain and the crooked places will be made straight. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out a mountain of disrepair, a stone of hope.” (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ~ Washington, D.C. August 28, 1968). Rating: 5 stars out of 5.

    Inscription: “The honorary designation of Hardin Street and installation of markers in the name of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, Blvd, recognizes the achievements of a man who inspired the world to embrace equality and non-violence to which he dedicated his life. Dr King served as Pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, Georgia. At age 35, Dr King was the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. On April 4, 1966, he was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee.” “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny, whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. ~ Letter from Birmingham City Jail: Birmingham, Alabama: April 16, 1965.” “The oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever rising tides of hate. History is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued that self-defeating path of hate. Love is the key to the solution of the problems of the world. ~ Nobel Peace Lecture: Oslo, Norway – December 11, 1964.” “It’s all right to tell a man to lift himself by his own bootstraps, but it is cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bootstraps. It is even worse to tell a man to lift himself by his bootstraps when somebody is standing on the boot. – Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution ~ National Cathedral (Episcopal), Washington, DC: March 31, 1968.” “I just want to do God’s will, and he’s allowed me to go up to the mountain, and I’ve looked over, and I’ve seen the promised land. I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight, that we as a people will get to the promised land. – I’ve been to the Mountain Top ~ Memphis, Tennessee: April 3, 1968 ~ (Dr King’s last speech before he was assassinated on April 4, 1968)” “I have a dream, my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. – I Have a Dream speech. March on Washington, DC: August 28, 1963”. “And when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and hamlet, from every state and city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children–black men and white men, jew and gentiles, catholics and protestants–will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old negro spiritual, ‘Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last.’ – I Have a Dream speech: March on Washington, DC: August 28, 1963.”

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The Pineapple Fountain of Charleston, South Carolina

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The Pineapple Fountain of Charleston
Charleston Waterfront Park * Concord Street * Charleston * South Carolina * 29401 * 1-800-868-8118 *

Charleston is known for its pineapple motifs, and this is one such magnificent portrayal of the cities fascination with the fruit. It is said to represent “hospitality”. Sitting in the Charleston Waterfront Park, this fountain is one of Charleston’s most iconic elements of the park. It can be viewed 6 am until midnight and has no admission.

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John Wesley Statue (Savannah, Georgia)

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* Reynold’s Square * Abercorn street * Savannah, Georgia *

in the center and heart of historic Reynold’s square, Savannah, Georgia is a bronze memorial statue of John Wesley (1969), the founder of Methodism and one of the first rectors of Savannah’s Christ Church. The statue was done by Marshall Daugherty to honor him because of the visit he took for mission work in Savannah from 1735-1738. He was also the founder of the first Sunday School in America. It is believed that his home was on this very spot. In this small wooden parish house, were held weekly meetings of the Christ Church congregation. John Wesley (1703-1791) was the founder of Methodism in 1729 when he met with three others at Oxford, created the faith, and their second meeting was in Savannah in 1736 at this place with 20-30 others. The statue consists of a stepped and blocked rectangular granite pedestal inscribed around its base, atop of which is a bronze cast statue of John Wesley, depicted as a young man wearing his Church of England vestments looking up from his bible to his congregation ready to speak with outstretched right arm in love, invitation and exhortion. He got his start in Savannah as Oglethorpe’s secretary, then as the rector for Christ Church until he was sent back to England with his brother. Statue was dedicated in 1969 by sculptor Marshall Daugherty.

References/recommended readings:

  • Ghost in My Suitcase: Reynolds Square. Website: http://www.ghostinmysuitcase.com/places/reynolds/ referenced in May 2013.
  • Visit Historic Savannah: Reynolds Square & John Wesley Statue. Website: http://www.visit-historic-savannah.com/reynoldssquare.html, http://www.visit-historic-savannah.com/john-wesley-monument.html. Website visited and referenced May 2013.
  • Wikipedia: Squares of Savannah, Georgia. Website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squares_of_Savannah,_Georgia#Reynolds_Square referenced in May 2013.

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The Meeting Place Statue, a.k.a. “The Hags with the Bags” (Dublin)

The Meeting Place Statue ~ aka The Hags with the Bags
* Lower Liffey Street * (near Ha’penny Bridge) * Dublin, Ireland *

Just across the Ha’penny Bridge, one will find the statue of two women engaged in conversation with shopping bags at their feet. This one is nicknamed “The Hags with the Bags” but is officially called “The Meeting Place Statue”. On one of the bags is written “Arnotts”. This is located along Lower Liffey Street. It was sculpted by Jakki McKenna in 1988. It was designed to reflect everyday life in Dublin’s marketplace to which it greets people to one of the area’s most popular shopping areas on Henry & Jervis streets, just after one crosses the Ha’penny bridge from Temple Bar.


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Modern Statue of Queen Maedbh (Dublin)


Modern Statue of Queen Maedbh

* Burlington Road, Dublin, Ireland *

The Modern Statue of Queen Maedbh / Maedhbh / Maeve standing strong and naked while holding a bull’s head. Located on Burlington Road, Dublin, Ireland. Photo take June 6, 2012. The statue was presented in 2004, and sculpted by Patrick O’Reilly. It depicts a modern re-telling of Queen Maeve, representing the power & equality of Celtic women, told by its viewers as a symbol of brutality, kitch, polyandry, and obsession of a power hungry queen. As a ruler of both mortals and the legendary fae, she was a female ruler in Irish History, dominating over western Ireland (Connacht) around the 1st century B.C.E. Strong, powerful, beautiful, and passionate about love and war. She was legendary for her large armies and rumored to have slept with many of her commanders, motivating them for her tasks at hand, and using them at her will. This statue was supposedly created to symbolize this power of her, represented by her large giant fomorian-like stature, naked, with a verocious sexual appetite. Legend has it that she could sleep with over 30 men a day. Her holding the head of a bull in the right hand represents her main myth, the Cattle Raid of Cooley. As her husband owned a bull of superior strength, that outranked her fortune. She couldn’t have that, so as she needed one to compete, she went to war to take the best bull known in Ireland. “The bull of Ulster”. The spear represents her as a warrior, the bird her freedom as well as her enchantment. It is one of Dublin’s little most known statues down a street not often frequented by the public.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

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The Linesman bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus

The Linesman bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus

The Linesman bronze sculpture
* by Dony Mac Manus * Dublin, Ireland *

As the flavor of Dublin is famous for with its statues, sculptures, and artwork … “The Linesman” begs no difference in popularity. This beautiful bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus is classified as a “figurative public sculpture” and is located on the Campshire along the City Quay (N 53 20.826 W 006 14.946 / 29U E 683109 N 5914411) being un-veiled in 1999 as a commission by the Dublin Docklands Development Authority from the artist to commemorate the tradition of docking in the area which disappeared after the arrival and containerisation of shipping cargo symbolizing life along the Quays of the River Liffey. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. Review by Leaf McGowan.

The Linesman bronze sculpture by Dony Mac Manus

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The Ghost Bikes of Dublin

Ghost Bikes of Dublin

* All around Dublin, Ireland (& the world) * http://ghostbikes.org/dublin *

An art project? A found art piece? memorial?

Its a memorial to a lost bicyclist who was hit or killed on the street. They are placed locked to a crash site with a small plaque and painted in white to serve as reminders of the horrors that bicyclists have faced and dealt with on their commutes or pleasure rides in the streets of the world. I came across them for the first time in Dublin, but they are a worldwide phenomena, first appearing in 2003 along the streets of St. Louis, Missouri. Now there are reported to be over 500 of them in over 180 locations around the world. The web site tells all. The site is setup to inform those about what this project is about, how to set up a ghost bike memorial, and the safety concerns with this issue. The Dublin project began in 2009 with the first ghost bike to Zu Zhang Wong organised by the Dublin Cycling Campaign (DCC). They reported that 11 cyclists died in Dublin from 2002-2006, seventy five percent from left hand turning lorries.

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American Stonehenge

American Stonehenge
Maryhill, Washington * Contact: Maryhill Museum of Art * 35 Maryhill Museum Drive * Goldendale, Washington 98620 * 509-773-3733 *
by Thomas Baurley

America has several Stonehenges – replicas of the infamous original from the British Isles. The American Stonehenge at Maryhill is one of the most popular sitting atop a lonely bluff overlooking the town of Maryhill, Washington and the length of the Columbia River. It is a full-size identical replica astronomically aligned of the ancient monument of “Stonehenge” in England. It serves as a replica for those who died in World War I and was built by the road engineer, Sam Hill from 1918-1930. It took him 12 years to perfect the monument, dedicating it on July 4, 1918 and completing it in 1929. He passed away shortly after its completion and was buried at the base of bluff below the monument in a difficult to reach location so that he’d be left alone by the tourists he expected to come see his monument. Hill originally built the monument after being mistakenly informed that the original Stonehenge was used for sacrifice. He wanted to symbolize how humanity was still being sacrificed to the God of War. His monument can be seen ominously looming on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River and easily seen by all passerby’s on U.S. Highway 97.

    The dedication plague at the monument reads:
    “In memory of the soldiers of Klickitat County who gave their lives in defense of their country. This monument is erected in the hope that others inspired by the example of their valor and their heroism may share in that love of liberty and burn with that fire of patriotism which death can alone quench.”

Sam Hill also built a mansion nearby that hosts the Maryhill Museum of Art holding monuments of the Klickitat County soldiers who died in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is also the very first monument in the United States to be constructed to honor the dead of World War I. The altar stone is aligned with the sunrise on the Summer Solstice. There is no admission to the Memorial.

American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington.  11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography.  Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/  American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629 Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151
American Stonehenge and the Columbia River Valley, Washington. 11/16/15. Chronicles 20: Exploring Oregon/Idaho border lands. October-November 2015. Photographs by Eadaoin and Thomas Baurley, Leaf McGowan, Technogypsie Productions. www.technogypsie.com/photography. Reviews: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. Chronicle tales: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=16903www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/
American Stonehenge: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=7629
Columbia River http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=1151

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Newgrange


Newgrange:

Bru na Boinne, County Meath, Ireland
One of Ireland’s most infamous monuments and archaeological sites, Newgrange is amongst the Bru na Boinne World Heritage sites next to Knowth and Dowth. It is popular like Stonehenge with its Solstice astronomical line-ups and viewing of the sun as it appears through its portal. The monument is a large mound complex shaped like a giant kidney covering an area of about an acre of land and is surrounded by 97 kerbstones most of which are decorated by megalithic rock art. Newgrange is one of the best examples in Ireland and Western Europe of a passage grave or tomb. Constructed around 3200 BCE, this site is older than the Egyptian pyramids and a 1,000 years older than Stonehenge.

Located along a elongated ridge on the Boyne River, five miles west of Drogheda, and close to the location where the Battle of the Boyne took place in 1690. Built entirely with stone tools, the Faerie Sidhe (folklore) or Passage Grave (Archaeology) is an impressive monument: The purpose of the monument is disputed greatly as there is no evidence that Newgrange was used as a repository for bodies, bones, burial artifacts or ash. Mythology tells us that the Tuatha De Danann, legendary first rulers of Ireland, built Newgrange as a burial place for their chief – the Dagda Mor with his three sons. The site is also believed to be where the hero Cuchulainn was conceived by his mother Dechtine. Also listed in mythology as a Faerie Mound, it was believed to have been the home of Oenghus, the God of Love. Other theories are that it was a place of worship for a “cult of he dead”; or for astronomically-based faiths. It is also believed to have been a burial site for Celtic Kings and a meeting place for Druids and Faeries. Legends state that t some otherworldly conditions, the Queen of the Faeries can be seen here with her subjects.

Visitors can only access Newgrange via bus shuttle from the visitor center at Bru na Boinne and those wishing to see the Winter Solstice sunrise light-up has to be awarded via lottery for the experience with a select few other lottery winners. A 19 meter long inner passage leads to a cruciform chamber with a corbelled roof. At the end of the passage are three small chambers off the larger central chamber. Each of the smaller chambers has a large flat “basin stone”; which is where it is believed the bones of the dead were originally deposited. During the Winter Solstice, lights of the rising sun enters the roofbox – lighting up the passage, and shining onto the floor of the inner chamber – illuminating the room for 17 minutes. Megalithic Rock Art surrounds the monument with some world notable pieces such as the triskel carved on the entrance stone, Kerbstone 1 and 52. Other rock art carvings fit into one of ten categories, five of which are curvilinear (circles, spirals, arcs, serpentine forms, and dot-in-circles), and the other five are rectilinear (chevrons, lozenges, radials, parallel lines and offsets). Intriguing archaeological finds were found throughout the site, including Roman coins, an iron wedge, and a stone phallus. It is believed to have taken 20 years to build with a work force dedicated all of those years full time of 300 individuals. Under the burial tomb theory, it is believed to have been sealed and closed for several millenia after which the local folklore and mythology of the faeries were believed to be assigned to the mound. The site was used for ritual purposes well into the Iron Age.

The Passage tomb was re-discovered in 1699 when material for road building was being harvested from the mound. A large excavation of the mound took place in 1962 as well as the rebuilding of the original facade of sparkling white quartz stones found at the site. Newgrange has been compared to the Gavrinis passage tomb in Brittany for which it is very similar to. The Gavrinis cairn is 5,500 years old; 60 meters in diameter, and covers a passage and chamber that is lined with elaborately engraved stone. Newgrange is built of alternating layers of earth and stone with grass growing atop, and the front reconstructed facade is of flattish white quartz stone studded at intervals with large rounded cobbles covering the circumference. Newgrange was found written about as a tumulus in a letter by Edward Lhwyd in December 15, 1699. The Annals of the Four Masters state that the Danes plundered Newgrange in 861. It has been said that during the first excavation, a large amount of treasures including ornaments and fictilia (earthenware objects) including a gold chain, two rings, a gold trocks, a bronze pin, and a small iron weapon were recovered.


 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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Men scryfa

Men Scryfa Standing Stone:
Near Madron, Cornwall, England

The Men Scryfa Standing Stone is a standing engrave stone sitting in the middle of a field not far from the infamous Men-an-Tol holey stone monument and the Nine Maidens stone circle. Its early origins is unknown just like with all the other standing stones. “Men Scryfa” translates to “Stone with Writing” as the stone bears early Christian inscription “RIALOBRANI CUNOVALI FILI” which translates to “Rialobran, son of Cunoval” according to some translators and “Royal Raven Son of the Glorious Prince” by others. This is a commemoration of the death in battle of a royal warrior or gravestone epitaph. Rialobran is thought to be a local king or warrior. The raven is a bird of carrion that is linked with death and the battlefield, assessed with the magical power of such things for those that worshipped it; also representative of the Irish Goddess Morrigan, the Goddess of War and Death. Celtic legends links the name Bran (as in RialoBRANi) to the ancient British warrior king, the keeper of the cauldron of immortality, whose decapitated head continues to have powers of speech. The story of RIALOBRANI is about an invader who attacked the Glorious Prince, seized his lands and occupied the Lescudjack hillfort at Penzance, sending the defeated royalty fleeing the area around Carn Euny or the hillfort of Caer Bran (the Raven Castle). The Royal Raven then supposedly tried to reclaim his territory and a great battle took place in result – killing Rialobrani / Ryalvran and burying him by this stone that was supposedly the same height as the deceased. There was legends of gold buried beneath it as well – though some farmer dreaming of a crock of gold dug a pit around the stone causing it to collapse and not finding any gold. The monument was re-erected at a recent date. The Latin dates to about 500 CE and it was found that the stone marks a grave. Whether the stone itself was erected earlier than that, we don’t know but is presumed to have been reused by the inscribers. It stands 2 meters high and probably dates from the Bronze Age for the stone carving/shaping/erection itself.

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Lanyon Quoit

Lanyon Quoit
near Lanyon Farm and Madron, Cornwall, England

Real close to Lanyon Farm lies a single megalith called “Lanyon Quoit”. Barely noticeable from the road as the stone property walls block the direct view from the roadway, is a little walk-through with a National Trust sign signifying the monument. As you walk up to the stone megalith – the sense of awe and history overwhelms you and enchantment of times long past of the people to came to this place to raise these large stones. Burial marker or tomb? Solar calendrical stones? Faerie Fort? No one really knows the true nature of the monument. This is one of Cornwall’s most ancient and popular monuments. It is believed to date from the Neolithic period (3500-2500 BCE), from a time where the only tools that existed to create these monument stones were themselves stones, sticks, and natural materials. The huge capstone of this monument had originally stood atop four upright stone columns, but through time it had collapsed to the ground, smashing some of the original stone supports during a storm in 1815. So the Quoit that is seen today, is the re-erected one, at right-angles to its original position, on top of what remains of the uprights. It was originally tall enough for a horse and rider to pass underneath it, that is no longer possible, as it is just over a meter tall at present. Sitting beneath it rewards the pilgrim an intense meditation and prophecy for the spiritual, and a moment of awe for the non-religious. Current archaeological theorie believes these quoits in the area as grave markers or funeral sites. Some have theorized that bodies were laid on top of the capstone to be eaten by carrion birds ans similar sites show evidence of bones from several individuals and its thought the bones were moved to sites such as this one for use in rituals to communicate with ancestors and the spirit world.

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Bert Gerresheim Altstadt Duesseldorf “Battle of Worringen” statue (Germany)


Bert Gerresheim Altstadt Duesseldorf Statue

Bert Gerresheim: Battle or Worringen
A beautiful, yet graphic monument to the foundation of the city of Duesseldorf at the Burgplatz in Old Town Aldst Duesseldorf. It was donated by the ‘Duesseldorfer Jonges’ (an association taking care of local traditions) on the occasion of the 700th city jubilee in the year of 1988 depicting the Battle of Worringen and was designed by sculptor Bert Gerresheim. Rating: 5 stars out of 5.
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Alki Beach (Seattle, Washington)


Alki Beach

Alki Beach * West Seattle, Washington
http://www.seattle.gov/parks/park_detail.asp?ID=445
Alki Beach is a long beach strip that runs that runs from Alki Point to Duwamish Head on Elliott Bay. A wonderful location for joggers, rollerbladers, beachcombers, sunbathers, bicyclists, and volleyball players. Equipt with plenty of parking, picnic tables, bathhouses, art studio, and a restroom – there is also a monument to commemorate the arrival of the first white settlers on the beach in November 13, 1851. This is where Chief Seattle and his tribe greeted them and assisted in building their cabins. North end of the beach is protected by a bulkhead and flanked by cottages with spectacular views of Puget Sound, the Olympic mountains, ferries, sailboats, as well as downtown Seattle. Popular spot by Seattleites for swimming, the water temperature from 46 to 56 degrees Fahrenheit. Over by cafes and shops that dot the landscape along Alki beach is a small replica of the original Statue of Liberty that was a gift from Reginald H. Parsons and the Seattle Council of the Boy Scouts of America in 1952. The statue has become such a symbol of liberty and courage that it became a place to mourn, to reflect, and to leave mementos after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. One of the great sites of Seattle that most tourists don’t know about. Rating: 3 stars out of 5. Visited 12/29/08.
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Custom House, Yorktown, Virginia


Custom House



Custom House ca 1720 – [NPS Monument marker sign ] “… collectors are hereby empowered to demand, secure, and receive all … the duties, customes, and imposts … with full power to go on board any boat, ship, or other vessel, or into any house … where he shall have just cause to suspect any fraud … collectors … shall .. in Aprill and October … render a true and just account upon oath, and make payment … of money as they … shall receive and collect for the duties … “ [An Act for Ports &c, April 16, 1691, Virginia Legislative Assembly]. In 1691, Virginia’s colonial legislature passed “An Act for Ports”, in an effort to better regulate trade for the collection of import and export fees and duties. The act called for the creation of several ports, including Yorktown, and the appointment of Collector of Ports by the royal governor. During Yorktown’s peak as a commercial port in the mid-1700s, Richard Ambler, and later his son, Jacquelin, served as collector of ports. In 1721, Richard Ambler built this large, brick storehouse and from here he and his son handled their collector duties. Ship captains recently arriving and merchants arranging for transport of goods would convene at Ambler’s storehouse to complete the required paperwork and pay the assessed fees. The outbreak of the American Revolution brought an end to many port activities, including the collection of customs. In 1776, Virginia militia troops were using the custom house for barracks and two years later, Jacquelin Ambler sold the property. In 1924, the Comte de Grasse Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution purchased the Custom House and restored it five years later. Today the Customs house still continues in use as a Chapter House and Museum.


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