Tag Archives: olympic peninsula

Sequim, Washington

Sequim

The area known as Sequim (pronounced SKWIM) is a modern city on the Olympic Peninsula within Clallam County Washington. It has a population of approximately 28,000 residents according to the 2018 census (City and surrounding supported area). It is a city located along the Dungeness River at the base of the Olympic Mountains and its rain shadow receiving less than 16 inches of rain a year. Even though it has about the same rainfall annually as Los Angeles, California it is located to some of the dampest temperate rain forests in the U.S. They call the area “Sunny Sequim” or “The Blue Hole of Sequim”. It actually has a more humid than expected climate, with fog, sun, cool breezes, and pleasant temperatures. It boasts a Mediterranean coastal climate with low rainfall, extreme summer temperatures, mild winters with little snowfall (often none at all) with the highest temperature recorded at 99 degrees Fahrenheit and the lowest at -3 degrees. It has a diverse biological spectrum with Western Red Cedars, Douglas-Firs, Black Cottonwoods, Red Alders, Pacific Madrone, Bigleaf Maples, Lodgepole Pines, Garry Oak, and many other trees usually larger than normal. This attracts the lumber industry to the area. There are also wide areas of open oak-studded prairies with excessively drained gravelly sandy loam soils historically though much of this has changed due to local agriculture. The city is most well known for growing lavender commercially making it the “Lavender Capital of North America” and only rivaled in the world by France. It is also know for the Dungeness crabs caught in the area.

Squim has a diverse history, with Paleontological remains of 14,000 year old Mastodon found with an embedded bone point demonstrating hunters were active in the area from as long as 14,000 years ago – being the first hunting weapon found dating pre-Clovis. (Archaeological excavation by Carl Gustafson in 1970) The S’Klallam (“the strong people”) tribes inhabited the area as the first known peopling pre-European. They named the area “Sequim” meaning “a place to go shoot” meaning good hunting and abundant game.

Europeans came to the area with George Vancouver’s exploration in 1790 alongside Manuel Quimper. The first settlers came in 1850 to the Dungeness Valley near Dungeness, Washington. They developed the lands to farmlands and arid prairies they nick-named “the desert” due to the lack of rain and dry weather. They developed irrigation canals in the 1890’s expanding farmlands. Settlers incorporated the area as “Sequim” in 1913 consisting mainly of farms, dairy farms, and other agriculture. At the end of World War I it was added by the railway via Port Angeles and Port Townsend carrying wood, lumber, and products.

Tourists are attracted to the area for the lavender, Dungeness crabs, and a massive herd of Roosevelt Elk.

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Port Angeles, WA

Port Angeles
48°06′47″N 123°26′27″

Geologically the area sits along a long and narrow glacial morraine called the Ediz Hook that projects northeast for 3 miles into the Strait of Juan de Fuca making a large natural deep-water harbor shielded from storms and swells with depths perfect for large ocean-going vessels, tankers, and cruise ships. On a clear day one can see Victoria, British Columbia across the Strait.

The region that is today called “Port Angeles” was a natural harbor area populated by a variety of Indigenous peoples who hunted, fished, and camped in the area. It was the site for the Tse-Whit-Zen village of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe as a major ceremonial center dating back almost 8,000 B.C.E. It is believed that European contact with diseases and Smallpox suddenly decimated the Native populations upon contact in 1780 and 1835.

It was first encountered in 1791 by European explorers, first by Spain’s Francisco de Eliza. Francisco named the area “Puerto de Nuestra Senora de los Angeles” (The Port of Our Lady of the Angels). It was first claimed by Spain after this explorer’s claim. The name for the area was later shortened to “Port Angeles”. As Europeans traveled in the region, they attempted trade with the Indigenous inhabitants with some success. In the 19th century Euro-Americans began settling in the area with fishing, whaling, and shipping as its industry. In 1856 a village was established conducting shipping and trade between America and Victoria British Columbia. In 1859 the Cherbourg Land Company established a settlement. The Salmon Chase protege “Victor Smith” whose position was to collect customs in the Puget Sound decided to move the Port of Entry from Port Townsend to Port Angeles. He also convinced President Abraham Lincoln to designate over 3,500 acres as a Federal Reserve utilizing the space for military and naval purposes as well as building a lighthouse. Shortly thereafter, the Military established a Federal town site under guidance of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers who established the street grids that still exist today. Settlers followed the Government occupation and creation of the port of entry. When Smith passed by the sinking of the Brother Jonathen, interest in the area dissolved leading to economic downfalls. The Port of Entry was returned to Port Townsend.

The town got a renewed interest of settlement by 1884 with the establishment of a wharf, trading post, general store, and hotel. As ferries traveled to the area it became another port of Entry again. The population grew from 300 inhabitants in 1886 to 3,000 residents by 1890. By 1914 it became a central hub for the logging and tree foresting industry seeing the construction of a large mill and railway. When the Hood Canal Bridge was established in 1961 more tourism and visitors came to the area, especially for the outdoor recreation opportunities from the Olympic National Park and rain forests. Fishing and boating became very popular along the Strait of Juan de Fuca as well. By the late 80’s most of the mills shut down and tourism became the main industry.

2003 saw construction of the Graving Dock Project involving over 275 million for construction as part of the Hood Canal Bridge East half Replacement Project. In 2004 the project was abandoned as unfortunately an enormous amount of human remains and Native American artifacts were encountered during construction discovering the largest prehistoric Indian village and burial ground at the time for the United States. With over 300 graves and over 785 human bones, ritual and ceremonial artifacts the area received notable awareness as the Tse-Whit-Zen village of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe.

Today Port Angeles is a major city along the Olympic Peninsula offering shopping, commerce, events, tourism, and industry to the region. It is located along the northern edge of the Olympic Peninsula bordering the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The city sits within the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains offering less rain than the remainder of western Washington with an approximate 25 inches a year of precipitation. It offers maritime Mediterranean-like climate with temperatures of 25-80 degrees but is vulnerable to windstorms, Arctic cold fronts, and approximately 4 inches of snow each year hosting cool summers and mild winters. It is the central headquarters for the Olympic National Park that was established during the Great Depression in 1938. Today it has an estimated population of around 20,000 (census 2010 – 19,038 residents).

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Port Orchard, Washington

Port Orchard
47°31′54″N 122°38′18″

Both a inlet body of water and a town, “Port Orchard” or “Poor Tortured” is a Port along a Puget Sound strait that separates Bainbridge Island from the Kitsap Peninsula. It extends from Liberty Bay to Agate Pass from the North to Sinclair Inlet and Rich Passage to the south. It was named by Captain George Vancouver after Harry Masterman Orchard of his crew, who acted as the clerk for the “Discovery” in 1792.

Originally a seasonal encampment by local indigenous populations for fishing and coastal activities, it soon became settled by Euro-Americans by 1854 when William Renton and Daniel Howard established a saw mill here. It was platted by Frederick Stevens in 1886 and first named “Sidney” after his father. It was incorporated as Sidney on September 15, 1890. It soon after became a military installation by the U.S. Navy. It was renamed to Port Orchard in 1892 by request of its residents at the time. This caused some controversy as a nearby town called Charleston had also wanted to change its name similarly. The Post office went through with the change and it wasn’t until 1903 that the state recognized the new name officially.

Today it is called “Port Orchard”. It is a charming little Port town with historic character and preservation, scenic beauty, and small town hospitality. It is a gem for artisans, craftspeople, and fishing. Seated within Kitsap County, en rout from the Mainland to the Olympic Peninsula, this historic small town of approximately 11,144 residents (2010 Census) greets some ferry tourists from the mainland with a slice of Pacific Northwest magic. Great views of the Sinclair Inlet, Hood Canal, and the Olympic Mountains in the distance. It is located close to Bremerton and is only 13 miles away from Seattle to its East, but is a quick ferry ride to either Seattle or Vashon Island.

The area was devastated by a tornado on December 18, 2018 with winds of 120-130 mph uprooting trees, destroying around 450 buildings, and a short-lived evacuation due to gas leaks.

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State of Washington

Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) - Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Oisin Rhymer, and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) – Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099.

Washington State

Named after the great President George Washington, the State of Washington is one of the largest states in the Pacific Northwest and is located north of Oregon, south of British Columbia, and west of Idaho. Once ceded by Britain in 1846 during land and boundary disputes with Oregon, the Washington Territory The state was created from the western part of the Washington territory became official in 1889 as part of the Union. The capital of Washington is the city of Olympia. The state often gets confused with Washington DC, and designated as such to be called Washington State or State of Washington. It is the 18th largest state in the U.S. and boasts of 71,362 square miles with over 7 million residents. 60% of that 7 million population live within the Seattle Metropolitan area. The State of Washington relies on the economies of lumber, ship building, plane building, information technology, software design, air crafts, missiles, food production, agriculture, chemicals, metals, and machinery. The state is abundant with Ponderosa pine, white pine, spruce, Douglas fir, hemlock, larch, and cedar. It is also a major supplier of apples, hops, pears, red raspberries, spearmint oil, sweet cherries, apricots, asparagus, dry edible peas, grapes, lentils, peppermint oil, and potatoes. It is also a major harvester of salmon, halibut, and bottom fish.

The territory and then now state of Washington was heavily populated by Native Americans from the origin of humanity for the continent. A long age-old story is told with the complexities of one of the oldest and most complete human skeletons to be found in North America called “Kennewick Man”. The first peoples here, were assembled as tribes who resided in the region, hunted, fished, and settled. They are most notable culturally for their carvings such as found in ornate carved canoes, masks, and totem poles. The indigenous subsisted on fishing – especially Salmon and whales. The peoples of the region were devastated by the arrival of European explorers and Euro-American settlers who in the 1770’s brought with them the Small Pox epidemic. The first European explorer recorded in the region was the Spanish Explorer Captain Don Bruno de Hecata who landed on the coast with the two-ship flotilla Santiago and Sonora in 1775. Hecata boasted discovering the region and claimed all the coastal lands up to Prince William Sound under the name of Spain by means of the Treaty of Tordesillas. He thereby called the Pacific a “Spanish lake” thereby justifying that all shores belonged to the Spanish Empire.

Captain James Cook sailed into the region by 1778 sighting Cape Flattery within the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca which had yet to be discovered. In 1787 the Imperial Eagle and its captain Charles William Barkley discovered and sailed through the Strait. The Straits were then explored by Spanish explorers Manuel Quimper in 1790 and Francisco de Eliza in 1791. George Vancouver finished off the mapping and explorations in 1792. The Spanish exclusively claimed the lands during the British-Spanish Nootka Convention of 1790, yet the region was infested by traders, hunters, fishermen, and explorers from all around the world making boundaries, land claims, and territorial disputes rampant. Captain Robert Gray discovered the mouth of the Columbia River and named it after his ship. Then Lewis and Clark took their expedition along the Columbia River on October 10, 1805. Great Britain laid claim to the territory after explorer David Thompson took his voyage down the Columbia and camped at the confluence of the Snake River on July 9, 1811 settling and building a trading post for the Northwest Company. The area was occupied by both Britain and the United States as a “joint occupancy of lands west of the Continental Divide to the Pacific Ocean” within the Anglo-American Convention of 1811. They thereby established the 49th parallel as the International Boundary west from “Lake of the Woods” to the “Rocky Mountains”. Spain gave up their rights North of the 42nd Parallel to the United States. Territorial disputes continued between the British and the Americans for several decades, but the Americans heavily settled the territory pushing the British north towards Canada. Numerous groups of Missionaries infiltrated the region by 1836 bringing thousands of emigrants across to the territory by means of the Oregon Trail. Britain finally ceded claims to the lands south of the 49th Parallel to the United States during the June 15, 1846 “Oregon Treaty”. The most infamous of the Missionary encampments of these Missionaries was Marcus Whitman’s “Waiilatpu” settlement near Walla Walla in southeastern Washington. He acted as a “Medicine Man” to these settlers as well as the indigenous of the reason. But once European diseases inflicted the Native populations and Whitman couldn’t stop it, he was blamed for sickening the Natives. The indigenous murdered him and 12 other setters during the Whitman massacre of 1847. This caused conflicts between the Euro-American settlers and the Native peoples leading to the Cayuse War.

Geologically Washington State is a incredible treasure-trove of activity and resources. The region is home to numerous dormant and active Volcanoes such as Glacier Peak, Mount Baker, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helen’s, and Mount Adams. To the far west are the Olympic Mountains hosting a temperate rain forest while the tallest Mountain in the State in Mount Rainier. Most of the western region is a marine West Coast climate with mild temperatures and wet winters, autumns, springs, and relatively dry summers. The Eastern part of Washington state is relatively dry with large areas of arid deserts and semi-arid steppes.

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Roads:


  • Interstate 84
  • Washington State Road 14

    Gig Harbor, Washington ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28461); Exploring the Olympic Peninsula. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 24, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
    Gig Harbor, Washington ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28461); Exploring the Olympic Peninsula. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 24, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Olympic National Park

Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) - Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103)

Olympic National Park
Olympic National Forest, Olympic Peninsula, Washington

One of the most famous National Parks in the State of Washington, the Olympic National Park is nearly surrounded by the Olympic National Forest, on the Olympic Peninsula, in the state of Washington. It consists of four regions within it – the alpine areas, the west side temperate rainforest, the east side forests, and the Pacific coastline. The park hosts three distinct natural eco-systems: (1) temperate forest, (2) rugged Pacific Shoreline, and (3) sub-alpine forest and wildflower meadows. This section of the Olympic National Forest was created as the Mount Olympus National Monument by President Theodore Roosevelt on March 2, 1909; then designated as a National Park in 1938 by President Franklin Roosevelt. In 1976 it became an International Biosphere Reserve and a World Heritage Site in 1981. The Park hosts 60 miles of rugged sandy beach shores along the Pacific Ocean, and two main rivers – the Hoh River and the Quileute River. The first inhabitants were the Hoh people who lived along the Hoh river and thd the Quileute people along the Quileute River. The earlier inhabitants of the area primarily fished, hunted and gathered. Then came the influx of Euro-American settlers who decimated the indigenous populations with their European diseases and genocide. The Euro-Americans came in for lumber and timber harvest, trapping, hunting, and use of the natural resources. The Olympic National Park preserves numerous valuable flora and faunal resources that need protecting. The region is abundant with chipmunks, skunks, squirrels, six species of bats, weasels, muskrats, beavers, red foxes, coyotes, fishers, river otters, mountain goats, martens, black bears, bobcats, cougars, Canadian lynxes, moles, snowshoe hares, shrews, whales, seals, sea lions, dolphins, sea otters, raptors, winter wrens, gray jays, Hammond’s flycatchers, wilson’s warblers, blue grouses, pine siskins, ravens, spotted owls, red-breasted nuthatches, golden-crowned kinglets, chestnut-backed chickadees, swainson’s thruses, hermit thrushes, olive-sided flycatchers, bald eagles, western tanagers, northern pygmy owls, townsend’s warblers and solitaires, vaux’s swifts, band-tailed pigeons, and evening grosbeaks. The park is used for fishing, boating, hiking, camping, repelling, rock climbing, skiing, snowboarding, sledding, surfing, water sports, elk watching, and rafting. The foggy sea stacks are a popular attraction along the beaches. Mount Olympus and the Blue Glacier are other outstanding natural features.

Sol Duc Hotsprings and Campground (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101). Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Sol Duc Hotsprings and Campground (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101). Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Olympic National Forest

Sol Duc Hotsprings and Campground (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101). Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Sol Duc Hotsprings and Campground (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101). Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099.

Olympic National Forest
Washington

One of my favorite forests next the the Redwoods is the Olympic National Forest especially the Olympic National Park. However, when I visited in March 2016, it just wasn’t the same. It seemed not in the glorious state I remember. Perhaps it was the wildfires in 2015 that battered it down. Nonetheless, a must visit location for anyone wanting to experience “America”. The Olympic National Forest is located on the Olympic Peninsula, west of Seattle Washington. The park consists of 628,115 acres of preserved rain forest and surrounds the Olympic National Park and its associated mountain range. The landscape varies depending on where in the forest you are, from beaches, salt water fjords, mountain peaks, and of course rain forest (temperate). The forest receives approximately 220 inches of rain each year. It was created as a Olympic Forest Reserve in 1897, then re-named the “Olympic National Forest” in 1907. The extent of its old growth is estimated to be around 266,000 acres (1993 study).

Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) - Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) – Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Sol Duc Hot Springs, Olympic National Forest, Washington

Sol Duc Hotsprings (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101); Olympic National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099), Washington. Exploring Olympic Peninsula - Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Sol Duc Hotsprings (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101); Olympic National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099), Washington. Exploring Olympic Peninsula – Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

Sol Duc Hotsprings and Campground, Olympic National Forest, WA
http://www.olympicnationalparks.com/lodging/sol-duc-hot-springs-resort/

As opposed to the rustic natural state of the Olympic Hot Springs, Sol Duc is the developed National Park Service hot springs resort in the Olympic National Forest. We wound up going here when we found out the road to Olympic Hot Springs had been washed out (March 2016). Sol Duc is well known for its pool, soaking tubs, and camping. It lies off the natural springs dotting the Sol Duc River. The original inhabitants of the area – various Native American tribes who frequented the Springs, believed them to be healing and therapeutic. Euro-Americans took over the area in the 1880’s as usual pushing out the aboriginal visitors. They opened a resort in 1912 here but it was burnt down in 1916. It was rebuilt in the 1920’s with less scale operating until the 1970s until problems with the spring occured. After the problems were resolved it was rebuilt again in the 1980s operating since. The current Springs are operated and managed by the National Park Service, open for visitors from March 25 until October 30th each year. The pools can be accessed from 7:30 am until 10 pm daily. Cabins and campsites are available for overnight lodging. There are 32 cabins that sleep 4 each, dining facilities on site, gift shop, store, a river suite that sleeps 10, 17 RV sites, and a primitive campground. There is no wifi, telephones, television, or radios offered. There are three modern pools, regulated and cleaned daily to soak within.

Folklore: Native American lore talk about two dragons who lived in the adjoining valleys who often would fight together. Their fights would be so fierce that the trees in the mountain’s upper realms would be destroyed so badly they would never grow back. The dragons experienced a even match each fight, and never able to prevail against one another. After years of struggling they each retired to their own valley, living under the earth, and it is their hot tears that feed the waters of the springs creating the hot springs – the Olympic Hot Springs and Sol Duc.

Geology: The springs are located on or near the Calawah fault zone extending from the southeastern Olympics to the northwest into the Pacific Ocean. The water is vented from a hot spring caused by geothermal heat coming up from the Earth’s mantle by geothermal gradient with water percolating up after contact from the hot rocks. Because the hot water dissolves solids, high mineral content is mixed in the waters ranging from calcium to lithium even radium causing healing effects on bodies soaked in them. The Springs are managed by Olympic National Park.

Sol Duc Hotsprings (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101); Olympic National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099), Washington. Exploring Olympic Peninsula - Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Sol Duc Hotsprings (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26101); Olympic National Park (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099), Washington. Exploring Olympic Peninsula – Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 25, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Hoh Rainforest, Olympic National Forest, Washington

Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) - Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Hoh Rainforest (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) – Olympic National Forest and Park

Hoh Rainforest, Olympic National Forest, WA

One of the largest rainforests in the United States resides in the Olympic National Park and is called the “Hoh Rainforest” after the river that runs through it. It is fully protected from industry, timbering, or the lumber world. The rainforest consists of over 24 miles of low elevation forest found along the Hoh River. This low elevation valley was formed by glaciers thousands of years ago. Unfortunately between the park’s borders and the Pacific Ocean, most of the neighboring rain forest has already been exploited by commercial interests. The bio-diversity of this rainforest is highly protected, studied, and observed. The main species of trees in the forest are the Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and the Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), as well as the Coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata), Red Alder (Alnus rubra), Big Leaf Maple (Acer macrophyllum), Black Cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), and Vine Maple (Acer circinatum) also being popular species found here. The forest is also home to various lichens and mosses, unique insects like the banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus) and the black slug (Arion ater), as well as the usual suspects of fauna such as the Roosevelt Elk (Cervus canadensis roosevelti), Black tailed Deer (Odocoileus columbianus), Olympic Black Bear (Usus americanus altifrontalis), Cougar (Felis concolor couguar), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), racoon (Procyon lotor), Northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), and the Pacific Tree Frog (Pseudacris regilla) as the most common neighbors.

Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) - Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) – Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Twilight Tour, Forks, Washington

Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington

Twilight Self-Guided Tour, Forks, Washington

Located on the outskirts of the Olympic National Forest, is the small lumber town of Forks, Washington. This town would not be so popular as it is today had it not been used as the actual setting for the Hollywood famed thriller “Twilight” movie series as well as their inspired saga novels they are based on. Because of the films and books, fans from far and wide travel to this town to see where the characters lived, roamed, and had their supernatural events. So popular there is a paid tour fans can go on, or for the budget conscious, to head off to the visitor center for a free self-guided tour brochure. The novels were written by author Stephanie Meyer who wrote about them using the city of Forks as her inspiration. The town hosts an annual celebration honoring the author here the 2nd week of September every year. Map and self-guided tour can be found here: http://forkswa.com/twilight/. For a non-fan like myself, it was a bit boring and un-inspiring, but to the fans, they seem to have fun. Rating: 2 stars out of 5

Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Twilight Self-Guided Tour: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26105. Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Forks, Washington

Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115.

Forks, Washington

Bordering the Olympic National Forest is the small sleepy timber town of Forks, Washington. With a population of just over 3,500 the town however gets alot of visitors from around the world as it was used as an inspirational setting for the novel series “Twilight” by author Stephanie Meyer. The town has gotten into the tourism and every September hosts an annual celebration honoring the works. The town is named after being at the “Forks” of the rivers nearby of Sol Duc, Calawah, Bogachiel, and Quillayute. The town began as a lumber industry headquarters, but was replaced by the tourism draw of the films and novels. Prior to the tourism, after the timber industry declined, most became employed by the Olympic Corrections Center and the Clallam Bay Corrections Centers nearby. Outside of film-based tourism, the town is a stop-off gas stop to Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest tourism traffic, sport fishers, and other road traffic. The town’s information center hosts a timber museum and yard with remnants of its past. September 13th is “Twilight Day” here, the fictional day before the character Bella’s birthday in the novels. The Twilight festival is set around this week.

[caption id="attachment_26163" align="alignnone" width="800"]Forks Timber Museum, Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. Forks Timber Museum, Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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La Push, Washington

La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119), Washington

La Push, Washington

Tribal lands outside of Olympic National Forest not far from Forks, and part setting / inspiration from Stephanie Meyers series “Twilight” it is a location off the path from the Twilight Tour in Forks. Only 14 miles towards the coast from Forks, this is the home of the Quileute Tribe who originally habitated these lands for their sea-faring quests and fishing trips. It was here they traditionally built their cedar canoes for oceanic journeys, whaling, and seal hunting. La Push is their current headquarters. They signed their first treaty with the Euro-American settlers here that eventually relocated them to a reservation in Taholah, but because of their remoteness, wasn’t enforced, and many stayed in this area. In 1889 President Grover Cleveland established a one mile square reservation here for them, with about 252 inhabitants. That same year, the town was destroyed by arson. Today it is a popular tourist destination and is home to oceanfront resorts, a fish hatchery, a seafoo company and a marina. They host an annual festival called Quileute Days every July 17-19th celebrating their cultural heritage, with fireworks, salmon bake, dancing, songs, softball and other tournaments, vending, and food. They are featured as characters in Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series as the wolf people. The unincorporated community sits at the mouth of the Quileute River in Clallam County Washington on the Olympic Peninsula. Its known for its whale watching and beaches. The name “La Push” comes from the Fench “La Bouche” meaning “The Mouth” referring to the mouth of the Quillayute River adapted by the local language. The climate is very wet oceanic with strong influences from the Pacific Ocean and very mild winters. It is an incredibly lush rainfall location.

La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) – Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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First Beach, La Push, Washington

First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) - La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) – La Push – Forks, Washington

First Beach, La Push, Washington

Tribal lands outside of Olympic National Forest not far from Forks, and part setting / inspiration from Stephanie Meyers series “Twilight” it is a location off the path from the Twilight Tour in Forks. Only 14 miles towards the coast from Forks, this is the home of the Quileute Tribe who originally habitated these lands for their sea-faring quests and fishing trips. It was here they traditionally built their cedar canoes for oceanic journeys, whaling, and seal hunting. La Push is their current headquarters. They signed their first treaty with the Euro-American settlers here that eventually relocated them to a reservation in Taholah, but because of their remoteness, wasn’t enforced, and many stayed in this area. In 1889 President Grover Cleveland established a one mile square reservation here for them, with about 252 inhabitants. That same year, the town was destroyed by arson. Today it is a popular tourist destination and is home to oceanfront resorts, a fish hatchery, a seafoo company and a marina. They host an annual festival called Quileute Days every July 17-19th celebrating their cultural heritage, with fireworks, salmon bake, dancing, songs, softball and other tournaments, vending, and food. They are featured as characters in Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series as the wolf people.

First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) - La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) - Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
First Beach (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26123) – La Push (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26119) – Forks, Washington: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26115. Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Eadaoin Bineid and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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