Tag Archives: pacific northwest

State of Washington

Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) - Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 26, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Oisin Rhymer, and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
Hoh Rainforerst (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26103) – Olympic National Forest and Park: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=26099.

Washington State

Named after the great President George Washington, the State of Washington is one of the largest states in the Pacific Northwest and is located north of Oregon, south of British Columbia, and west of Idaho. Once ceded by Britain in 1846 during land and boundary disputes with Oregon, the Washington Territory The state was created from the western part of the Washington territory became official in 1889 as part of the Union. The capital of Washington is the city of Olympia. The state often gets confused with Washington DC, and designated as such to be called Washington State or State of Washington. It is the 18th largest state in the U.S. and boasts of 71,362 square miles with over 7 million residents. 60% of that 7 million population live within the Seattle Metropolitan area. The State of Washington relies on the economies of lumber, ship building, plane building, information technology, software design, air crafts, missiles, food production, agriculture, chemicals, metals, and machinery. The state is abundant with Ponderosa pine, white pine, spruce, Douglas fir, hemlock, larch, and cedar. It is also a major supplier of apples, hops, pears, red raspberries, spearmint oil, sweet cherries, apricots, asparagus, dry edible peas, grapes, lentils, peppermint oil, and potatoes. It is also a major harvester of salmon, halibut, and bottom fish.

The territory and then now state of Washington was heavily populated by Native Americans from the origin of humanity for the continent. A long age-old story is told with the complexities of one of the oldest and most complete human skeletons to be found in North America called “Kennewick Man”. The first peoples here, were assembled as tribes who resided in the region, hunted, fished, and settled. They are most notable culturally for their carvings such as found in ornate carved canoes, masks, and totem poles. The indigenous subsisted on fishing – especially Salmon and whales. The peoples of the region were devastated by the arrival of European explorers and Euro-American settlers who in the 1770’s brought with them the Small Pox epidemic. The first European explorer recorded in the region was the Spanish Explorer Captain Don Bruno de Hecata who landed on the coast with the two-ship flotilla Santiago and Sonora in 1775. Hecata boasted discovering the region and claimed all the coastal lands up to Prince William Sound under the name of Spain by means of the Treaty of Tordesillas. He thereby called the Pacific a “Spanish lake” thereby justifying that all shores belonged to the Spanish Empire.

Captain James Cook sailed into the region by 1778 sighting Cape Flattery within the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca which had yet to be discovered. In 1787 the Imperial Eagle and its captain Charles William Barkley discovered and sailed through the Strait. The Straits were then explored by Spanish explorers Manuel Quimper in 1790 and Francisco de Eliza in 1791. George Vancouver finished off the mapping and explorations in 1792. The Spanish exclusively claimed the lands during the British-Spanish Nootka Convention of 1790, yet the region was infested by traders, hunters, fishermen, and explorers from all around the world making boundaries, land claims, and territorial disputes rampant. Captain Robert Gray discovered the mouth of the Columbia River and named it after his ship. Then Lewis and Clark took their expedition along the Columbia River on October 10, 1805. Great Britain laid claim to the territory after explorer David Thompson took his voyage down the Columbia and camped at the confluence of the Snake River on July 9, 1811 settling and building a trading post for the Northwest Company. The area was occupied by both Britain and the United States as a “joint occupancy of lands west of the Continental Divide to the Pacific Ocean” within the Anglo-American Convention of 1811. They thereby established the 49th parallel as the International Boundary west from “Lake of the Woods” to the “Rocky Mountains”. Spain gave up their rights North of the 42nd Parallel to the United States. Territorial disputes continued between the British and the Americans for several decades, but the Americans heavily settled the territory pushing the British north towards Canada. Numerous groups of Missionaries infiltrated the region by 1836 bringing thousands of emigrants across to the territory by means of the Oregon Trail. Britain finally ceded claims to the lands south of the 49th Parallel to the United States during the June 15, 1846 “Oregon Treaty”. The most infamous of the Missionary encampments of these Missionaries was Marcus Whitman’s “Waiilatpu” settlement near Walla Walla in southeastern Washington. He acted as a “Medicine Man” to these settlers as well as the indigenous of the reason. But once European diseases inflicted the Native populations and Whitman couldn’t stop it, he was blamed for sickening the Natives. The indigenous murdered him and 12 other setters during the Whitman massacre of 1847. This caused conflicts between the Euro-American settlers and the Native peoples leading to the Cayuse War.

Geologically Washington State is a incredible treasure-trove of activity and resources. The region is home to numerous dormant and active Volcanoes such as Glacier Peak, Mount Baker, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helen’s, and Mount Adams. To the far west are the Olympic Mountains hosting a temperate rain forest while the tallest Mountain in the State in Mount Rainier. Most of the western region is a marine West Coast climate with mild temperatures and wet winters, autumns, springs, and relatively dry summers. The Eastern part of Washington state is relatively dry with large areas of arid deserts and semi-arid steppes.

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  • Interstate 84
  • Washington State Road 14

    Gig Harbor, Washington ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28461); Exploring the Olympic Peninsula. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 - Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf  and Prince Cian.  Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 24, 2016.  To read the adventures, visit  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007.   To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews.  All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com - by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.
    Gig Harbor, Washington ( http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=28461); Exploring the Olympic Peninsula. Northern Exposure: Chronicle 24 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington. Photos taken March 24, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=20007. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved.

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Seattle, Washington

Seattle, Washington a.k.a. “The Emerald City” (due to the lush evergreen trees in the area and to pull attention away from its other name “The Rainy City”. It’s a gateway to Alaska, The Queen City, The Jet City.
2006: Population – 578,700 with a metropolitan population of 3.8 million
Believed to be the birthplace to grunge music, reputation for being the largest coffee consumption city, birthplace for Starbucks and Seattle’s Best, and Tully’s. Seattle has the highest percentage of college graduates in the U.S., and home to one of the U.S. largest gay populations. The true town of “Boom” or “Bust”. It thrived and demised on its big booms … the lumber industry boom in its beginnings, till it burnt down. THe Panic of 1893. The Klondike Gold rush 1897, until it went bust. The ship building boom. The Boeing boom. The Microsoft boom. the .dotcom boom. Inhabited by nomads and tribes for 4,000 years – since the end of the glacial period (c. 8,000 BC – 10,000 years ago); First inhabited by the Duwamish Tribe with some 13 villages in the area of what is Seattle today as the first recorded inhabitation in 1850’s. Then the Denny party moved in 1851 to Alki beach and started the foundations of Seattle. Of course, there was a reason the native tribes did not inhabit that area, and they quickly felt the wrath of the area and decided to move to Elliot Bay where downtown Seattle now sits. A fellow named “Doc Maynard” moved in just south of the Denny’s. The area was first called “Mud Flats” because they chose to build the city of Seattle on top of mud flats. Little did they plan or organize, not knowing the tides, and the severe flooding that constantly took place on the space that they chose. So from the lumber industry boom, just kept filling in the streets with dirt, rock, and sawdust. The roads became quicksand. For 25 years. They continued with the lumbering and shipping the wood to San Francisco. Henry Yesler moved in and brought the first steam sawmill to the region. Struggling with the flooding, and battles with the Native Americans, it was a difficult city to live in. Prostitution, liquor, gambling, opium dens, etc. became prevalent in the downtown area. Rivalry with its sister city Tacoma also made competition tough. 1873 the Railway chose Tacoma over Seattle making times difficult. The railway didn’t hit Seattle till 1884. It wasn’t till 1906 before Seattle got a major rail passenger terminal. Seattle was often lawless and had a corrupt mayor. Lynch law was prevalent, schools barely operated, and indoor plumbing was a nightmare. Those who lived on the hills ran their sewage down into the downtown area in hollowed out wooden tubes, with current drifts from Tacoma, and dumping into the Bay, with tides and what-not, it all cess-pooled in the original Skid Row, that is now downtown Seattle. Sewage came in with the tides. The mudflat base kept making potholes throughout the city, regardless of how much they filled them with dirt and sawdust. When one pothole became so large a boy drowned in it, the city realized they had to face this problem as the pothole became 8 feet deep. The Great Seattle Fire of 1889 pretty much burnt down the entire city. Starting in a glue factory, spreading to a paint factory, then to a warehouse holding explosives and gunpowder, during low tide with no fire trucks and means to fight the fire, the city was essentially demolished burning 29 city blocks. The city rebuilt, replacing the wooden ash structure piles with brick and mortar – requiring a building code to mandate that. The city was renamed to “Seattle” – named after “Chief Noah Sealth” who was chief of the two tribes living in the area – anglicized to “Seattle”. Within a year after the fire, the population grew from 25,000 to 40,000. Mainly from the large amounts of construction jobs created from the fire. While rebuilding the city, they filled in the mudflats, and built a waffle-iron effect of a city in the downtown area. Building on top of buildings, levels, and layers – causing many new problems. This is why Seattle has an underground labyrinth of mazes. (which I’ll write about later) Now a booming city of technology and industry, a fascinating place to visit, with arts, culture, music, and business opportunities galore. The largest city in the Pacific Northwest, located in the United States, in Washington, between Puget Sound and Lake Washington. Nearly 108 miles south of the US-Canadian border, in King County.

Seattle from the docks


Puget Sound
View of Seattle from Capital Hill

walking around Capital Hill, Seattle, WA, A Sigil Adventure. Final move from the Pacific Northwest: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Seattle. Photos taken November 11, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017. Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography. More info about Colorado Springs: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=31051. Seattle, WA: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=38. Capital Hill: http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=34093.

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