Tag Archives: Queensland

Manly Market (Queensland, Australia)

Manly Market
Manly Beach, Queensland, Australia
http://www.manlyharbourvillage.com/

Every sunday the Manly Creative Markets spreads out its presence in the Little Bayside Park along the Esplanade of the beaching and boating resort of Manly Beach. It runs from 8 am to 3 pm offering a wonderful assortment of hand crafts, Australian local gifts, food, snacks, handcrafts, and farmer’s produce. Lots of Food, fruits s, vegetables, plants, and crafts are available. On the entertainment side offered are kid’s rides, a coffee shop, massage services, performances, and a dog wash. Great place to get gifts!

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Manly Harbour, Queensland, Australia

Manly Harbour
Manly Beach, Queensland, Australia
http://www.manlyharbourvillage.com/

Manly Harbour is a popular resort location, especially for boating. It is also home to Manly Harbour Village which supports the community of boaters and recreationists who utilize the docks. Sheltered from harsh weather and the sea, Manly Beach and its harbour is conveniently locaed 20 minutes outside of Brisbane and is Brisbane’s only bayside village. Manly Beach Harbour is also Australia’s east coast’s largest man-made marina giving a docking home to over 1,500 boats and vessels. Surrounding the marina are many restaurants, coffee houses, galleries, accomodations, and entertainment/recreational venues … and its a portal to many islands such as Moreton Bay and historic St. Helena Island. In addition, it is home to an annual Harbour festival and weekly arts, crafts, and farmer’s markets. With a long stretch of esplanade to walk, completely bounding the marina, is a great panorama of the boater’s world. Inset into internationally recognized wetlands, even the bird watcher can come here to view over 43 species of wading birds.

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Brisbane River (Queensland, Australia)

Brisbane River

Queensland, Australia

The Brisbane River quickly became home to me during my Australian travels in the Summer of 2011. It was home to the HMB Endeavour, upon which in May I was a volunteer tour guide and crew member while it was in port at the Brisbane City Center and during its circumnavigation voyage leg from Brisbane to Gladstone. I found the river as it flowed through Brisbane to be a hub of cultural activities from outdoor recreation, panoramic scenery, cultural events, to botanical garden goodness. It was also a hot spot for transportation to and from work while I was living in Manly West and the West End. The Brisbane River is the longest river in southeastern Queensland, flowing through the metropolitan hub of Brisbane before it empties into the Moreton Bay. It was named after Thomas Brisbane, the Governor of New South Wales, in 1823 by John Oxley who was the first European to navigate and explore the river. Its mouth at Moreton Bay did however get visited by Captain Cook, Matthew Flinders, John Bingle and, William Edwardson, all whom failed to discover the river. After the river was given this name, so was named the penal colony that once habitated the lands where metropolitan Brisbane now stands. This amazing river will astound you with beauty and richness as it is a major waterway between Brisbane and Ipswich. The River from afar in its contrasted beauty shimmering reflections of skyscrapers and modern architecture unfortunately is quite murky, dark, and polluted within its depths. It comes from Mount Stanley, 214 miles away, dammed at Wivenhoe Dam to form Lake Wivenhoe which is the water supply for the city. The river is known to be abundant with the rare Queensland lungfish, Brisbane River cod, and bull sharks. The river has 16 major bridges crossing it, as well as the Clem Jones Tunnel which was built in 2010 to go underneath it . It is a hub of activity as personal watercrafts, large ocean vessels, ferries, yachts, and historic ships travel this waterfare. The River sees alot of commuter traffic on the River CityCat.

The largest ship ever to be built on the river was a 66,000 ton beast done so by Robert Miller, though was un-moored by the 1974 Brisbane flood, one of the most devastatingly damaging floods in the river’s history. The River historically flooded severely numerous times in 1893, 1974, and most recently in January of 2011. The river has expanded its port facilities, especially that on the historic “Fisherman’s Island” which is now known as the “Port of Brisbane”.

The Brisbane river is fed from the Brisbane Mountain Range that is east of Kingaroy. The River proceeds south past Mount Stanley, through the Moore and Toogoolawah townships where the Stanley River meets with the river, then runs into Lake Wivenhoe, eastward to merge with Bremer River, on into Brisbane including Jindalee, Indooroopilly, and Toowong. Within Brisbane, the River goes under the Kangaroo Point Cliffs, a quarry area that is a scenic spot for the River, and a popular location for parties, drum circles, and other outings. The River is also fed by other tributaries besides the above such as Breakfast Creek, Moggill Creek, Bulimba Creek, Norman Creek, Oxley Creek, Lockyer Creek, Cressbrook Creek, Cooyar Creek, Cubberla Creek, Wolston Creek, Woogaroo Creek, Goodna Creek, Six Mile Creek, Bundamba Creek, Pullen Pullen Creek, and Kholo Creek.

Pre-contact, the river was very popular among the Aboriginal peoples of the Turrbal nation as a location for fishing and fire stick farming. After Contact, with explorations by Captain Cook, Matthew Flinders, John Bingle, and William Edwardson of the area, first being missed by them. It was however discovered by Western settlers in 1823 when convicts sailing from Sydney on a timber retrieval mission to Illawarra were blown north by a storm stranding on Moreton Island. They escaped by making it to the mainland after going south of the Brisbane River. As they were heading home north back to Sydney, they discovered the river, by walking upstream along its banks for almost a month before making their first crossing at “Canoe Reach” where it junctions with Oxley Creek by stealing a small canoe from the Aborigines. At the same time, John Oxley was sailing into Moreton Bay looking for the prime location for a new convict settlement when he discovered the stranded men. In 1823, the river was named after Sir Thomas Brisbane the then governor of New South Wales and saw its first settlement in 1824 on its shores. The first private wharves were built in 1848 and then the first shark-proof river baths established in 1857 at Kangaroo Point. River dredged in 1862 for navigation requirements. Because of the early settlement of Brisbane water quality deteriorated to a level that several public baths could no longer source water from the river. Even to the 1930’s the water was remarked as clear, and swimming in the river was still very popular. But as Brisbane grew, the river clarity worsened and became likened to a sewer and waste dump. A River walk was established and restoration of the river was seen in the later end of the 20th century. Even by 2000, the Brisbane River did not meet environmental standard guidelines. In 2008 river quality still not seen healthy with murky waters and no longer recommending swimming in the waters. In addition, bull sharks have made their home in the river causing much more dangers, being home to numerous shark attacks and deaths.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Brisbane River CityCat

Brisbane River CityCat

Brisbane River, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

One of Brisbane’s most popular form of public transportation and sightseeing is the Brisbane River CityCat and CityFerry Services. This ferry is very fast, efficient, and inexpensive way to get from point A to point B during one’s explorations of Brisbane and its famous river, parks, recreational boardwalks, playgrounds, picnic sites, trails, restaurants, cafes, markets, pontoons, and fishing facilities. The city now boasts with its 19 CityCats and 9 CityFerries (2012 statistics). The service saw disruptions and damages during the January 2011 flood, but by January 2012 has all of its 24 terminals operating again seven days a week from 5:50 am until 10:30 pm. The October 2011 arrival of the newest CityCat, the “Spirit of Brisbane” was dedicated to Brisbane’s community spirit from the most recent floods. All of the CityCats are equipt with Wifi allowing access to UQConnect and EduRoam as well as the Translink timetable and City Council’s websites. Tickets can be purchased via bus and ferry operators, staffed rail stations, Customer Service Centers, and local newsagencies and convenience stores. Timetables can be found on the TransLink website at http://www.translink.com.au/

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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New South Wales

New South Wales
Australia

One of my favorite regions of Australia, the NSW, or “New South Wales” is located along the southeastern edge of Australia, just north of Victoria and south of Queensland. It totally surrounds the Australian Capital Territory and is Australia’s most populated state (1/3 of Australia’s population) with those who call themselves the “New South Welsh” or the “New South Welshmen”. It’s capital is Sydney. Founded in 1788 it was formed as a Federation in 1901 and originally became the bulk of Australia’s mainland encompassing historic Van Diemen’s lands (Tasmania), Lord Howe Island, and Norfolk Island as well. New South Wales even for a time held claim and custody of New Zealand when Britain annexed it in 1840, but the 19th century later separated these areas from NSW to form the British colonies of Tasmania, South Australia, Victoria, and Queensland.

The landmass of Australia that became to be known as New South Wales was first inhabited by the Australian Aborigines roughly 40-50,000 years ago. New South Wales was first discovered by Captain James Cook in 1770 during his explorations along Australia’s east coast. He named the area “New Wales” originally, then re-naming it to “New South Wales” during his survey. When the British decided to come and settle Australia in 1788, it was here in “New South Wales” where they established the “First Fleet” or the first penal colony led by Captain Arthur Phillip until 1792. The entire state was a penal colony in its origins. This led to much upheaval and disruptions in colonization when things got out of control. Governor William Bligh took command of the region in 1792 during a time of unrest and anarchy until 1809 when Britain replaced him with Lieutenant Colonel Lachlan Macquarie. Macquarie set out numerous projects to build order and community, including the construction of roads, churches, public buildings, communiies, wharves, and city structures. He also set out numerous explorers to map out the land from Sydney and to construct a well thought out street layout for Sydney. By 1825 Tasmania was separated from NSW as Van Diemen’s Land, 1836 South Australia was made its own State, 1841 New Zealand its own country, 1851 Victoria its own State, and 1859 Queensland its own state. Charles Darwin came to the region in 1836 and wrote much about NSW in “The Voyage of the Beagle” where he had mixed reactions about the State, speculations about formations of its valleys, the aboriginal populations, the penal colony, and the viable future of Australia. His thoughts and words were considered tremendously amongst his European coherts, at the same time during which in the 19th century the movement towards federation of the Australian colonies became a potential future. New South Wales was trying to become a free trade state causing turmoil with other leading colony states such as Victoria formulating friction. After World War I, farmers became discontented with the fixed prices paid by the authorities resulting in the formation of the “Country Party” in 1919. Political and class conflicts took place in 1929 seeing great instability during the Great Depression. Mass unemployment and collapse of the commodity prices destroyed the economy. By World War II, many differences came to surface between Australian states, especially with the NSW, mostly focused around federation and economic developments. The War however, brought in industrial development, a war economy, and jobs. By the 1960’s, the New England region of the state began a secessionist movement but was defeated even though its outcome were several referendums. The NSW Constitution and form of Government has stayed consistent since 1856 even though became amended numerous times since the referendums, and 1901 saw its official stamp as a state of the Commonwealth of Australia. New South Wales is most popular for its tourism, outdoor recreation, especially in the coastal regions, as well as for the production of seafood, beef, dairy, fruit, timber, hay, fruits, legumes, lucerne, maize, nuts, wheat, oats, oilseeds, poultry, rice, oysters, wool, coal, and sugar cane. It is also the only center for winter sports in all of Australia, with its premiere ski resort on Mt. Kosciuszko. Outside of the Snowy Mountains with its alpine climates, most of NSW is either arid or semi arid in nature with the eastern coasts having a temperate climate. There are more than 780 National Parks in New South Wales which makes up close to 10% of the State’s area covering various terrains from deserts, bush, rainforests, plains, and mountains. Much of it is also coastal scrublands.

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Reddacliff Place, Brisbane, Australia

Reddacliff Place
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Every day during my gig as a tour guide for the HMB Endeavour, I would walk through Reddacliff Place. Reddacliff is also known as Brisbane Square. Its a great little market square located between the Victoria Bridge and Queen Street Mall, at the base of Brisbane Square across from the Treasury Casino. Wednesdays it is home to a farmer’s and crafter’s market, and other days of the week have various other activities taking place in it. Modern art dot its landscape with giant metallic balls giving light in some humor that “Brisbane has balls”. It is strictly a walking square, as bicycles are not permitted, though now has some bicycle racks provided.

One of my favorite little hotspots in Brisbane’s City Center was the Brisbane Square, as it was often frequented by markets and sales. Brisbane Square is a small city block square at the foot of a high-rise building called “Brisbane Square” which rises 151 meters tall with over 38 floors which is primarily used for office spaces, the lower floors for commercial retailers, and the underground hosting upwards of parking for 350 vehicles. This is also currently the home location for the Brisbane City Council and Suncorp. The square is bounded by George Street, Queen Street, Adelaide Street, and William Street. It faces the Treasurey Casino on Queen State as well as the Law Courts Complex on Adelaide. The building and square was designed by architect Denton Corker Marshall. The skyscraper was completed in 2006. The square is home to many different markets from produce vendors, home-made crafts, to giant yard sales, and cultural events. The square has numerous modern art sculptures and monuments. Rating: 4 stars out of 5. ~ Leaf McGowan.

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Mooney Fountain (Brisbane)


Mooney Memorial Fountain a.k.a. Eagle Street Fountain
* corner of Queen Street and Eagle Street, 118 Eagle Street, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia * 400 *

Every day enroute to work as volunteer guide aboard the HMB Endeavour, I passed by this quaint little ornate Victorian Revival Gothic styled fountain, and finally took a chance to admire this work of art. At a height of 990 centimeters with a 210 centimeter square base, it was created by artist William Webster in 1879 and today represents a good example of a Victorian era public monument and amenity with careful and ornate design mimicking that which occurs on the Albert Memorial in London. It was setup first as a memorial to the 1879 Council, and then in 1988 as a memorial for a brave volunteer fireman James Mooney who lost his life fighting a fire on Queen street in the March of 1877. This dedication was inscribed on the base of the fountain. This was volunteer firefighter James Thomas Mooney who died in an explosion attending a fire on Queen street. It reads “Dedicated in the Bicentenary year of 1988 to the sacred memory of James Thomas Mooney a young fireman who lost his life on the 25th day of March 1877 as a result of burns received fighting a fire and to all firemen who have made the supreme sacrifice”. It is made in Victorian Revival Gothic style wholy out of Murphy’s Creek sandstone by the designers W.H. Chambers and William Webster between 1878 and 1880 for 627 GBP funded by the Brisbane Municipal Council and public subscriptions to enhance the city’s image. The three drinking heads are lion motifs consisting of Sicilian marble inserts. The base of the fountain is Mt. Alexander granite. Some controversy was struck later as addition of the names of all the Aldermen of the day were added. Rating: 2 stars out of 5.

    Bibliography/References:
  • Monument Australia: Mooney Fountain. Website referenced December 2011. http://monumentaustralia.org.au/monument_display.php?id=90792&image=1

  • Public Artwork: Mooney Fountain. Website referenced December 2011. http://publicartwork.jsadigital.com.au/home/item_detail.aspx?ID=258.

  • Your Brisbane: Past and Present. Website referenced December 2011. http://www.yourbrisbanepastandpresent.com/2009/11/mooney-memorial-fountain.html.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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James Cook University | Brisbane


James Cook University @ Brisbane
Queens Street, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

A private university established in 1970 in the heart of Brisbane near Eagle Street Pier, James Cook offers its students a committment in the study of Australia’s indigenous cultures, a dedication to research especially in marine sciences, biodiversity, tropical ecology, global warming, tourism, tropical medicine, and public health care. James Cook offers smaller classes with more direct access to teaching staff, and is a broad school throughout Australia with large campuses in Townsville and Cairns, regular campuses in Brisbane, Sydney, and Singapore, and smaller study centers in Mount Isa, Thursday Island, and Mackay. The school’s base is in Townsville, Queensland, Australia. It is the 2nd oldest university in Queensland, and the first tertiary education institution in North Queensland. Named after Captain James Cook whose ship the HM Bark Endeavour was grounded in North Queensland. It was proclaimed a university through Act of Queensland Parliament on April 20, 1970 first as the University College of Townsville changing names to James Cook University of North Queensland with Queen Elizabeth II officiating. In 1974 when Cyclone Tracy in Darwin hit, James Cook University decided to open a cyclone research facility which now operates as an independent unit of the School of Engineering and acts as an advising member to the Australian Standards committee in areas of structural design specializing in wind actions. The Brisbane campus however was not established until 2006. Student populations university-wide are around 16,338 with over 3,400 international students. Aside from its popular courses, James Cook also offers an online astronomy degree.

    Bibliography/References:
  • Ifsa Butler: James Cook University. Website referenced December 2011. http://www.ifsa-butler.org/james-cook-university.html

  • James Cook University. Website referenced December 2011. http://www.jcu.edu.au/.

  • Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. James Cook University. Website referenced December 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cook_University.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Sushi Kim’s (Brisbane, Australia)

Sushi Kim’s
* 388 Queen St. (Wharf St.), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia 4000 *

Just as you’re walking down Queen Street from the Queen Street Mall as it turns to Wharf Street, enroute to Eagle Pier, on the left hand side is a small little tiny sushi mart that has incredibly affordable, delecious, and fresh sushi and rolls (made every two hours) (cheap as $2 per foll) that are also very volumptuous. Its mainly a takeaway for the local business and workers crowd. Not only is it fast to get but friendly staff and owner. Rating: [rating:4] (four stars out of 5) ~ Thomas Baurley, 4/28/11.

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Adelaide Street


Adelaide Street

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

One of Brisbane’s major thoroughfare streets in the City Center is Adelaide Street. Here is located King George Square, Brisbane City Hall, the ANZAC Square with the Shrine of Remembrance, the ANZAC Square Arcade, Law Courts Complex, Brisbane Square and the Post Office Square. The street runs paralle to Ann Street and Queen Street. The street is most popular for the televised annual ANZAC day parade that takes place on April 25th. The street is also popular for catching and departing buses from Queen Street Mall.

Photos are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced without permission of authors Tom Baurley or Leaf McGowan. Photos can be purchased via Technogypsie.com at Technogypsie Photography Services for nominal use fees. Restaurants, Businesses, Bands, Performances, Venues, and Reviews can request a re-review if they do not like the current review or would like to have a another review done. If you are a business, performer, musician, band, venue, or entity that would like to be reviewed, you can also request one (however, travel costs, cost of service (i.e. meal or event ticket) and lodging may be required if area is out of reviewer’s base location at time of request).

These reviews are done by the writer at no payment unless it is a requested review and the costs for travel, service, and lodging was covered – in which case, expenditure reimbursement will not affect review rating or content. If you enjoy this review and want to see more, why not buy our reviewer a drink to motivate them to write more? or help cover the costs they went through to do this review?






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Brisbane CBD

Brisbane Central Business District (CBD)/Queen Street Mall

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Everyday for the first part of May I passed through the Brisbane CBD along the Queen Street mall enroute to my volunteer job as tourguide for the HMB Endeavour. Always distracted by unique shops, cool fashion, and foodstuffs along my journey. This area is Brisbane’s City Center and is considered its own suburb along the northern bank of the Brisbane River. It is triangular shaped and bounded by the Brisbane River to the east, south, and the west. Its tip is known as “Gardens Point” where it slopes up towards the northwest where the parklands and inner city suburbs are located. The area is concentrated with skyscrapers, retailers, and walking malls. It is also home to the City Botanic Gardens, Wickham Park, and the Roma Street parklands. The area was laid out in the early colonial era as a grid with the northwest-southeast streets named after male members from the House of Hanover with the northeast-southwest streets after female personas. Queen street runs along its center encompassing the most popular shopping district in Brisbane as a pedestrian mall. Its North Quay is where the first European explorers along the Brisbane River. It was near here that the original settlement farm known as “Petries Bight” was originally established to feed the colony named after Andrew Petrie, later home to the wharves, and now where the water police are located. The Center is also home to the Brisbane City Hall, Museum of Brisbane, City Council, Queensland’s Parliament House, Pancake Manor, Masonic Memorial Center, Queensland University of Technology Gardens Point Campus, Queens Gardens, Post Office Square, King George Square, and the City Hall. Four bridges connect the CBD with the rest of Brisbane as the Captain Cook Bridge, the Victoria Bridge, the William Jolly Bridge, and the Go Between Bridge. The area is surrounded also with bicycle and pedestrian footpaths, including some bridges specifically for them such as the Goodwill Bridge. It is also home to the central hub of all public transport including the main bus stations, railway station, and city ferries. Very enjoyable place during a visit to Brisbane. Rating: [rating=3.5]. ~ Leaf McGowan

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Brisbane Square

Brisbane Square
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

One of my favorite little hotspots in Brisbane’s City Center was the Brisbane Square, as it was often frequented by markets and sales. Brisbane Square is a small city block square at the foot of a high-rise building called “Brisbane Square” which rises 151 meters tall with over 38 floors which is primarily used for office spaces, the lower floors for commercial retailers, and the underground hosting upwards of parking for 350 vehicles. This is also currently the home location for the Brisbane City Council and Suncorp. The square is bounded by George Street, Queen Street, Adelaide Street, and William Street. It faces the Treasurey Casino on Queen State as well as the Law Courts Complex on Adelaide. The building and square was designed by architect Denton Corker Marshall. The skyscraper was completed in 2006. The square is home to many different markets from produce vendors, home-made crafts, to giant yard sales, and cultural events. The square has numerous modern art sculptures and monuments. Rating: 4 stars out of 5. ~ Leaf McGowan.

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Victoria Bridge of Brisbane

Victoria Bridge
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

As I was staying in the infamous West End of Brisbane, my foot and bicycle passage to the City Center was The Victoria Bridge. This was Brisbane’s first permanent bridge and had its foundation stone laid on August 22, 1864 by the late Governor Bowen. It wasn’t finished construction until late 1874 due to financial constraints the city was having at the time. A temporary wooden bridge was opened for traffic in 1865, but due to its partial collapse in 1867 due to the wood-boring worm known as Teredo, was closed until final completion of the now permanent one. In 1893 floodwaters carried away the northern half of the bridge, again in 1896 on the temporary structure, and it was re-opened in June 1897. Due to buckling stresses in 1943, the bridge began restricting number of trams allowed on it, though it lasted until 1969 when it was demolished. A second bridge was created by A.B. Brady in 1969, made of steel, costing 3.2 million, with two carriageways and two footpaths. A This was the first road connection between the north and south Brisbane. The bridge is shared by pedestrians, vehicles, and bicyclists – each with their own lanes. It connects the South Bank Parklands and the Queensland Cultural Center to the city center called the Brisbane central business district or the “CBD” at North Quay. Half of its current roadspace is now consumed by the southeast Busway system. The bridge has some great panoramic views of the Brisbane River, the Cultural Center, and the City Center. Rating: 3 stars out of 5. ~ Leaf McGowan

Bibliography/References:

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Brisbane’s West End

Brisbane West End
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

My first online Couchsurfing experience in Australia was in Southern Brisbane’s infamous inner-city suburb called “The West End”. A great alternative artsy lively area of cultural hodge-podge, the West End I found was one of the more exciting neighborhoods in the city. It is also one of Brisbane’s oldest. It has the Brisbane River weaving around it from its west and south. The West End is accessed from downtown via the Victoria Bridge and past South Brisbane. The area was first home to many indigenous communities acculturating to western culture, and migrant families who settled in Queensland for a new start in a new world. The area was named after London’s West End by the early English settlers in the area. The Indigenous called the area “Kurilpa” for “place of the water rat”. Since then however, the suburb has been redeveloped and gentrified. One of the most attractive aspects to the area I found was its culinary delights and variety from Asian to Indian, pizza to gourmet burgers, lots of ethnic, vegetarian or organic restaurant selections, and a plethera of coffee shops which it is most known for. Lots of diverse shopping attractions along Boundary street as well. Well known for its ethnic and organic grocery stores. Great second hand shops abound from book dealers to vintage clothing. Good transportation options abound in the area from the high-frequency bus service, bicycle trails along the river’s edge, and the Citycat ferry service running to the Unversity at St. Lucia down the river to Hamilton. There is also access stations to the South Brisbane Railway and the Cultural Centre Busway Station giving access to all parts of Queensland. Every Saturday, a popular food and craft market is held in the Davies Park at the former Tristram’s Drink Factory from 6 am until 2 pm along the Brisbane River at Montague Road. The West End is also home to Brisbane State High School (Year 8-12), lodging for the University of Queensland & Griffith University Southbank, QUT, and the West End State Primary School. The West End is home to many young professionals, students, teachers, artists, and the hipster crowd. It was one of Brisbane’s first suburbs to be serviced by a tram line which began in 1885 with horse-drawn service until 1969. The film “Jucy” was filmed in the area in 2010. During the 2010-2011 Queensland floods, the area was evacuated and devastated from water damages including destruction of the West End ferry wharf. Overall, the West End is a great center for culture and healthy living. If I ever moved to Brisbane, it would be my top choice of places to live. Rating: 5 stars out of 5. ~ Thomas Baurley

Southbanks Parklands

Bibliography/References:

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Queensland, Australia

Queensland, Australia:

Also known as the “Sunshine State”, Queensland is most noted for its warm weather, entertainment, and tropics. She was named in honor of Queen Victoria who on June 6, 1859 signed the Letters Patent separating the colony from New South Wales. Australia is split up into a number of states and one of the most popular is “Queensland”. It is the state that encompassed the northeastern section of the mainland continent. To the west lies the Northern Territory, to the South is New South Wales, with Torres Strait with Boigu Island off of New Guinea, and South Australia to the southwest. Queensland’s coasts runs along the Pacific Ocean and the Coral Sea. Queensland is the second largest state in land mass or area and is the third most populated. Historically, this state was first occupied by the Torres Strait Islanders and the Indigenous Australians who first inhabited the region 40,000-65,000 years ago. The area was first explored by white adventurers such as the Dutch, Portugese, and French before Captain Cook navigated the area in 1770. Numerous wars and battles between European settlers and the Indigenous took place in this state. It was first made a British Crown Colony on June 6, 1859. The Capital of Queensland is Brisbane and is the area of highest population concentration for the state. Other major cities in Queensland are Logan City, Ipswich, Toowoomba, the Gold Coast, the Sunshine Coast, and Redland City. By Area, Queensland’s “Mount Isa” is the fifth-largest city in the world. The state is broken up into regional centers known as Cairns, Mackay, Townsville, Bundaberg, Rockhampton, Hervey Bay, Ingham, and Mount Isa. Today, Queensland is dominated by an economy based on tourism, natural resources, and agriculture. The most popular parts of Queensland are many of its coasts like the “Sunshine Coast” and “the Gold Coast”, as well as its panoramic mountain ranges like the “Bunya Mountains” and the “Great Dividing Range” with offers breathtaking views, waterfalls, and lookouts. Queensland is home to six World Heritage sites such as the “Australian Fossil Mammal Sites”, “Gondwana Rainforests of Australia”, “Fraser Island”, “the Great Barrier Reef”, “Lamington National Park”, and the “Wet Tropics of Queensland”. It’s Gold Coast is known as “Australia’s Theme Park Capital” since it has five major amusement parks such as Dreamworld, Sea World, Movie World, Wet n’ Wild, and White Water World. Queensland’s climate has low rainfall and hot summers in the inland west while very wet and humid warm temperatures along its coasts. Queensland produces bananas, peanuts, pineapples, grain, fruits, vegetables, cattle, coton, sugar cane, wool, bauxite, coal, silver, lead, zinc, gold, and copper.

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Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Brisbane
Queensland, Australia

* http://www.brisbane-australia.com/ *

Brisbane is a tourist and resort capital of Australia, being central to entertainment, attractions, theme parks, beaches, and tourism. It is one of Australia’s heartbeats of fine dining, sightseeing, holiday, and the cosmopolitan experience. It is also a threshhold to business and industry for Australia. With a population of over 2 million, Brisbane attracts people from all walks of life – from the young party-goer, to the wanderlust tourist, to the conference-goer, and the elite business-person, Brisbane has a little bit of something for every visitor. Brisbane is the capital of Queensland as well as the state’s most populated city. It is the third largest city in Australia. Nestled in the bend of the Brisbane River, 23 kilometers from the mouth of the river as it meets Moreton Bay. Surrounded by the River’s floodplains between the Bay and the Great Dividing Range. The city is very hilly with partial elevations by spurs of the Herbert Taylor Range including the summit of Mount Coot-tha, Enoggera Hill, Mount Gravatt, Toohey Mountain, Mount Petrie, Highgate Hill, Mount Ommaney, Stephens Mountain, and Whites Hill.

The River and the City is named after the Governor of New South Wales – “Sir Thomas Brisbane” who presided from 1821 through 1825. The area was first inhabited by the Turrbal and Jagera people who originally migrated to the area through the Torres Strait having called the area first the “Mian-jin” or “place shaped as a spike”. The First “White” exploration, was done by “Matthew Flinders” on July 17, 1799 when he landed at “Woody Point” to which he called “Red Cliff Point” based on the “red colored cliffs” that are visible from the Bay. As the area was settled, Sir Thomas Brisbane the Governor of NSW ordered that a new northern penal settlement to be established which became Queensland’s first settlement at Redcliff under command of Lieutenant Henry Miller, 14 soldiers with wives and children, and 29 convicts. Around 1825 it became abandoned and was relocated to the North Quay in 1825. The original site was called “Edenglassie” then named “Brisbane”. He also instructed for “John Oxley” to conduct a further exploration of Moreton Bay. With Oxley and his expedition exploring deeper down the Brisbane River, they reached Goodna, which is 20 kilometers upstream from the current location of Brisbane’s financial district. By 1838, non-convict European settlement occured here. By 1842 numerous free settlers came into the area and the current location of Brisbane was named the capital of Queensland by 1859. By 1930 Brisbane’s City Hall was completed, the “Shrine of Remembrance” was constructed. During World War II, the Allied Campaign under General Douglas MacArthur setup their headquarters there until they were moved to Hollandia by 1944 with over a million US troops passing through Australia during the war. In 1974 the Brisbane Flood temporarily disabled the city even though it was at this time that Brisbane was seeing its greatest growth spurts as it became a global destination of interstate migration. By 2009, Brisbane was voted the 16th “most livable city in the world”. In 2011, Brisbane was also affected by another major flood even though it was not as high as the 1974 flood but causing just as extensive damage and disruption. Brisbane is in the “Tropical Cyclone risk zone” as it has been the location for several cyclones. Brisbane’s industry is tourism, petroleum refining, stevedoring, paper milling, metalworking, technology, science, and the QR railway. Brisbane is also home to numerous schools and universities such as the University of Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, Australian Catholic University, and the Griffith University. Brisbane is a thriving music mecca with live entertainment including popular and classical music as well as numerous choirs. Art has captivated Brisbane as modern art is abundant throughout the city especially in the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Brisbane is also a mecca for recreation with over 27 km of bicycle pathways, swimming, fishing, boating, rock climbing, and sports.

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Brisbane International Airport


Brisbane International Airport
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Brisbane’s International Airport, also known simply by the acronym “BNE” is Brisbane’s main airport with both internationals and domestic services. It is the third busiest Airport in Australia next to Sydney and Melbourne. The airport is located to the northeast of the city center. From 2008-2009, the Brisbane Airport saw over 18.5 million passengers. The airport is serviced by the Brisbane Airtrain that provides a full rail service from the city center to and from the International and Domestic areas of the airport.

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