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The History of Wandering Leaf Designs or “Wandering Leaf, LLC”

Wandering Leaf Designs, also known as “Wandering Leaf, LLC” was a web studio located in the region of North America’s Pacific Northwest – servicing its clients in the United States & Canadian provinces. A Limited Liability Company, Wandering Leaf Designs provided their clients with top-notch web designs, logos, art, graphics, wireless / nomadic technologies, and hot spots of interest from 2000 until 2004. “Wandering Leaf Designs” was founded after the closure of “Leafworks, Inc.. “Wandering Leaf Designs” was closed when its C.E.O., organizer, lead designer/developer, and mover/shaker left the .dotcom industry to return to his passion of “Archaeology & Anthropology”. Once on the trail to doing work at the Camano Beach Excavation, Miami Circle’s “Icon Brickell” project, and finally to be the GIS Specialist/Curator for the U.S. Army’s Cultural Resource Management Program at Fort Carson, he no longer had the time to continue operating “Wandering Leaf Designs”, much of which was the lasting demise of the “.dotcom” collapse that started in the late 1990’s into the early Y2K era. The Company closed shortly after his absence.

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Jacqui Wood


Me and Jacqui Wood excavating at Saveok, 6/17/2010

Jacqui Wood

A stunning woman with a depth of prehistoric and historic knowledge, Jacqui Wood is a scholar ahead of her time – or should we say ‘before’ her time. I memorably remember seeing the article about Jacqui’s archaeological project at her home Saveok Mill and the overwhelming urge to contact her to see if I could come experience firsthand her discoveries. It was Archaeology Magazine’s article on her recent findings that introduced me to Jacqui. Little did I know that I had heard of her in my museum studies classes. The more I read about Jacqui, the more excited I became about meeting her. Jacqui possesses a wealth of knowledge about past life ways that she’s discovered through the practice of Experimental Archaeology. So I planned a trip to England in order to learn from her. This was one of the wisest choices I’ve made in my archaeological career – to visit and learn from Jacqui. It was most definitely one of the best Archaeological experiences I’ve ever had. That’s a lot to say because I’ve had a lot of varied experience over the last 20 years in Archaeology – as I’ve excavated and surveyed in Italy, Florida, Texas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Washington, New Mexico, Colorado, and Canada. I’ve excavated a Roman Villa, an Etruscan City, An Apalachee Village, A Spanish Mission, Shell Middens, A downed World War II Plane, Burial Sites/Grounds/Graves, Homesteads, Ritual Sites, Rock shelters, Rock Art, Hearths, and Habitation Sites. I’ve done curation and artifact analysis for several curation facilities including the National Park Service and the U.S. Army. While no two sites could ever be compared – none of these sites captivated me more than the experience I had at Saveok. If only funding existed for me to do more there. Jacqui was so much more fantastic in person than what I read about her. I learned so much from the short visit I had and developed a thirst for more. But as I’m a Federal Archaeologist, Curator, and GIS Specialist – I have duties at home requiring my present attention. What Wood is uncovering though, has been a life’s dream for me, so someday I know I’ll be back.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when I took annual leave for my first trip to Cornwall, burdened with backpack and luggage, tromping down the forest path, across the railroad tracks to Saveok Mill. I was impressed the moment I met Jacqui. She had an ancient ambiance, a radiation of knowledge of how things worked, and how our ancestors figured things out. When she discovers something, she has a pretty clear theory of what she’s looking at, or how it was created. That was impressive. Forget Indiana Jones as an icon of an Archaeologist, I present you ‘Jacqui Wood’. Jacqui Wood is an independent researcher and Experimental Archaeologist. I would say over her 25+ years in the field, she’s been monumental in the advancement of Experimental Archaeology in the discipline. She has developed a particular approach to discovering the practical aspects of prehistoric Europe’s daily life. She bases this approach on the theory that the inherent skills and ingenuity of prehistoric Europeans are still latent in the people of Europe today. She believes that these survival skills have only been forgotten in Northern Europe because we don’t have a need for them in the modern age. She has found that these skills are very easily acquired particularly if one is not impeded by any training in the skill to be researched and needs to be approached purely by logic. The best way to learn about a prehistoric settlement she believes is to create one, utilize it through trial and error, and learn to survive based on what is at hand. This is how she discovered the archaeological horde that lies in her backyard. She was working on recreating a metal foundry when she discovered a habitation floor. Several years later she did an excavation with some field school students and before she knew it – she had one of Cornwall’s best examples of a ritual site in her own personal sandbox. This led to her creation of “Saveok Water Archaeology” – an archaeological research centre and field school with its own multi-period excavation. This opened large doorways to taking her experimental archaeological projects onto central stage by creating the Cornwall Celtic Village as a representative reconstructed Bronze and Iron Age settlement. This however was not her first footsteps into the cultural limelight … she served a three-year term of office for the Council for British Archaeologys National Education Committee and well as CBA’s secretary in the southwest region, worked for many years demonstrating Bronze Age technology for English Heritage (including events at Stonehenge), and has lectured throughout Europe in Italy, Germany, Poland, and Lithuania. She was commissioned to make the Grass cloak for the infamous “Ice Man” museum in Bolzano, Northern Italy and worked on many museum exhibits for Expo 2000 in Hamburg. She was commissioned by the Orkney Council to make the first replica of Britain’s oldest textile garment “The Orkney Hood“. Jacqui has also read papers at the European Association of Archaeologists conference since 1997 as well as writing a full paper on “Food and Drink in European Prehistory” for the April 2000 journal. She has a full paper published in the Journal Cornish Archaeology on “Courtyard House Construction” as well as several other papers in various academic journals including “Discovering Archaeology”. Jacqui has been the consultant archaeologist for various reconstruction projects in Italy and Eastern Europe as well as Cornwall’s own “Eden Project”. She has authored “Prehistoric Cooking” (published by Tempus) and did a Woman’s Hour interview and Food Programme for Radio 4 over the same subject. I wouldn’t be surprised if she was the world’s authority on Prehistoric Cooking. Wood has been invited and received on various television programmes in Britain and Europe, demonstrating ancient cooking, experimental archaeology, and her expertise. She did a piece on “ancient beer” for Chris Denims ‘The Local’ series, presented on ‘The Lost Land of Lyonaise’ for Carlton, and served as the Time Team food historian for the last five years. She has done a reconstruction of an Upper Paleolithic house and discussed the artifacts for the “Mysteries in the Landscape” BBC program in 2003 as well as for February 2005’s BBC 2 “Otzi” Programme. Even with her full time dedication to Experimental Archaeology, Saveok, and Prehistoric Cooking – she finds time to write a Mesolithic adventure novel which has become a trilogy, run a farm, and raise sheep. I’m working through her first book now and can honestly say, I’ve become one of her fans. I would highly recommend her field school to any students interested in experimental archaeology, prehistoric Europe, or Cornish history or any conference looking for a speaker on Prehistoric life ways. Major Kudos to you Jacqui and a grand “thank you” for a wonderful time at your site and centre. Keep up the ground-breaking work. [ ~ Thomas Baurley, Archaeologist/Curator/GIS Specialist, Fort Carson Cultural Resource Program in Colorado ]

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