Tag Archives: World War 2

The German Iron Cross of Roswell

Iron Cross at Spring River
~ North bank, Spring River, Roswell, New Mexico ~

Embedded in the North bank of the Spring River by the Roswell Spring Hill Zoo is a heritage landmark that was created by German prisoners of War who were working on a flood control project that was part of their incarceration. It was in 1943 that a 50 man detail rip-rapped rocks on the Spring River banks. It was on the north bank between Pennsylvania and Kentucky Avenue that they made an “Iron Cross” on the bank. These men were prisoners of war imprisoned during World War II in a camp near Orchard Park. The camp housed more than 4800 German prisoners of war from the Afrikacorps Rommel’s men of the 8th army from 1942-1946. There were numerous residents in Roswell who were angered at this work and retaliated by pouring five yards of concrete over their landmark. The concrete over time washed away and it is said to be visible again.

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The Ansbach Residence (Ansbach, Germany)


Ansbach Residence, Ansbach, Germany

Ansbach Residence, Ansbach, Bavaria, Germany
* Schloss- und Gartenverwaltung Ansbach * Promenade 27 91522 Ansbach * Tel. (09 81) 95 38 39 -0 Fax (09 81) 95 38 39 -40 * sgvansbach@bsv.bayern.de *
RESIDENCE AND COURT GARDEN OF THE MARGRAVES OF ANSBACH
OPENING TIMES OF THE RESIDENCE: April September: 9am 6pm; October March: 10am 4pm; Closed Mondays. The palace can only be visited by participating in a guided tour. Tours (ca. 50 minutes) take place every hour until 5pm in the summer and until 3pm in the winter.
The Residence of the Margraves of Ansbach were under reconstruction and revitalization while we visited, so unfortunately couldn’t take a very good look at the exterior of this palace since the scaffolding was blocking the view. We did however take the 50-minute guided tour into the interior, no photographs were permitted, and the guided tour was in German. Luckily I had the pleasure of a best friend accompanying me and giving me the translations, as well as a english guide i could read while touring. Great history and phenomenal art within. I was quite impressed. According to the brochure: “The Residence of Ansbach originated as a medieval complex. The large Gothic Hall with its ribbed vault, in which the largest collection of faience and porcelain from the former Ansbach Manufactory is now on display, was built in around 1400. The medieval complex was redesigned as a modern residence between 1705 and 1730.
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