Gray Whales

Names: Gray Whales, whales, devil fish; Kingdom: Animalia; Phylum: Chordata; Class: Mammalia; Order: Artiodactyla; Infraorder: Cetacea; Family: Eschrichtiidae; Genus: Eschrichtius; Species: E. robustus.

Description:

Gray Whales are known around the world as either the gray back whale, Pacific gray whale, or california gray whale. They grow upwards of 49 feet in length with over 49 tons of weight, living to approximately 55-70 years in age. They are described as gray with gray patches and white mottling on dark gray skin. They are baleen whales that migrate annually, feeding and breeding in certain regions. Known as devil fish for the manner of how they fight when hunted. They are descendants of filter-feeding whales dated to the Oligocene (30 million years ago). Females show highly synchronized reproduction with oestrus occuring in late November/early December involving multiple mates that coincides with annual migration. Gestation is approximately 12 and a half months. Calves are born in a 6 week window during mid January. Calves are born tail first approximately 13 feet in length, single birth, mammalian birth. Mother lactates for 7 months after birth, then calves are weaned and maternal care decreases. Gray whales tend to locate themselves in lagoons during lactation to protect the newborns from sharks and orcas. They have complex breeding patterns involving 3 or more animals – male and female whales hit puberty around 8 years. Gray Whales feed mainly on benthic crustaceans by turning on its side and scooping up sediments from the ocean floor, using its baleen or whalebone as a sieve capturing small sea animals.

Habitat/Locale: Eastern North Pacific of the Americas; endangered in the western North Pacific (Asia) areas. North Atlantic.

Diet: Primarily benthic crustaceans and plankton

Uses: whale oil, meat, fat, bones for tools. Humans have challenged the gray whale to extinction level threats from whaling.

History:

Folklore/Mythology:

Spirituality:

This is a work in production. It is incomplete.

References/Recommended Reading:

  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
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  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at

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Sea Gulls

Names: Sea gull, gulls, mews. Taxonomy: Kingdom: Animalia; Phylum: Chordata; Class: Aves; Order: Charadriiformes; Suborder: Lari; Family: Laridae Genera

Description: Sea Gulls are probably the most famous of the sea birds. They are part of the family “Laridae” and closely related to Sternidae or “terns”, distantly related to auks, skimmers, and waders. Sea Gulls can be found ranging in size from medium to large and are often either grey or white in color with black markings on their heads and/or wings. They have stout long bills and webbed feet. They make a harsh wailing or squawking call. They are ground-nesting carnivores and are known scavengers. Their jaws are unhinging so they can consume large prey. They are long-living recorded upwards of 49 years of human year age. They nest in large densely packed noisy colonies. They lay 2-3 speckled eggs in vegetation composed nests. They are resourceful, intelligent, inquisitive, social, and complex. They socially network and fight with one another, often creating a mob and attacking or harassing predators. They have been recorded to actually have tool-use behaviours, such as the herring gull using pieces of bread as bait to catch goldfish. They have also attacked parasitically live whales landing on their backs and pecking out pieces of flesh.

Habitat/Locale:

Diet: Carnivorous focusing on scavenging, crabs, and small fish.

Uses:

History:

Folklore/Mythology: Originally named “mews” after the German Möwe, Danish måge, Dutch meeuw, and French mouette.

Spirituality:

This page is currently being written. Please check back soon.

References/Recommended Reading:

  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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Cormorants

Cormorants
~

Article by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

Name: Cormorant

Folk Name: Cormorant, shags

Taxonomy: Animalia, Chordata, Aves, Suliformes; Phalacrocoracidae; Phalacrocorax

Locality: Worldwide – Coastal regions. Pacific Northwest in the Americas. P. carbo and P. aristotelis only two in British Isles. They have not been found in the Pacific Islands.

Description: These birds are large birds weighing upwards of 11 lbs with a 18-39 inch wing span, mostly dark feathered, with long, thin, hooked bills. There are over 40 species of the Cormorants or Phalacrocoracidae. Feet webbing are between the four toes. They eat fish by diving from the surface propelling themselves underwater with their feet and wings, recorded diving as deep as 45 meters. They nest in colonies around rock islands, rocky cliffs, islets, along the shore, and in trees. Originally they are deduced to have originated from fresh water environments.

Uses:

Folklore/Spirituality: The name comes from the Greek phalakros meaning “bald” and κόραξ meaning “raven”. The name “Cormoran” comes from the Legends in Cornwall about the sea giant named “Cormoran” in the tale of Jack the Giant Killer.

This is a work in production. It is not complete.

More information:

If you would like to contact the author about this article, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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Guillemots

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA.

Guillemots
~

Article by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

Name: Guillemots

Folk Name: guillemot,

Taxonomy: Animalia, Chordata, Aves, Charadriiformes, Alcidae,

Locality:

Description: Known as the common murre or common guillemot, these birds are large auks, with a circumpolar distribution spending its time at sea except for breeding along rocky cliffs. “Guillemot” is a common name for these sea birds of the auk family. They fall under the genera Uria and Cepphus and the Uria are the Murres while the Cepphus are the Guillemot. They have fast direct flight but are not very agile, they maneuver well underwater diving to depths of 30-60 meters, though maximum depths recorded are around 180 meters. They breed in colonies with high density populations and are often in physical contact with their neighbors, they don’t make nests and lay single eggs they incubate on bare rock ledges which hatch around 30 days of incubation. The eggs are water-repellent and self-cleaning. The infant chick is born downy regulating its own body temperature around day 10, after 20 days they leave the nest for the sea although unable to fly yet upwards of 2 months after birth, they glide with fluttering wings often accompanying the male parent. The female parent stays at the nest upwards of 14 days after the chick leaves. The chick learns to dive as soon as they hit the water. Murres sometimes nest through the winter, though northern populations spend winters farther from their colonies. They often grow to 38-45 cm in length with a 61-73 cm wingspan. Its hard to tell the difference between males and females. The common species during breeding possess black on the head, back and wings, with white underparts. They have a thin dark pointed bill and small rounded dark tail. Face is usually white with a dark spur behind the eye, though some are dark brown rather than black. Legs and bill tend to be grey, though some have been recorded as yellow/gray. Feathers sometimes moult later in the year, but basic plumage occurs as late as may. The Uria together with the razorbill, dovekie, and extinct great Auk are the tribe Alcini with distinct white bellies, thick long bills larger than the Cepphus, with their dense reproductive colonies on the cliffs. The three living species of Cepphus create the Cepphini tribe and are smaller than the Uria with black bellies, rounder heads, and bright red feet.

Uses:

Folklore/Spirituality: The name comes from the Greek ouriaa – a waterbird mentioned by Athenaeus and the Old Norse alka or “auk”.

This is a work in production. It is not complete.

More information:

If you would like to contact the author about this article, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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Puffins

Puffins
~

Article by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

Name: Puffins

Folk Name: Puffins, little brother, fraterculini, fratercula

Taxonomy: Animalia, Chordata, Aves, Charadriiformes, Alcidae, Fraterculini, arctica (F. arctica; F. cirrhata; F. corniculata; †F. dowi)

Locality: Two of the speices can be found in the Northern realms of the Pacific Ocean, while the Atlantic Puffin can be found in the northern realms of the Atlantic Ocean.

Description: An amazing bird under Fraterculini that has three main species of alcids or auks. Puffins have a stocky build, large beaks that change coloring with seasons, and primarily black and white feathering. They have short-tails, black upper parts, and white to brown/gray underparts, head possessing a black cap, white face, orange-red feet. They are silent at sea flying high above the water roughly 10 meters compared to the 1.6 meters that other auks fly. They possess a short wing span which helps them with swimming and what appear to be a flying technique they use underwater. In the air they are known to have upwards of 400 wing beats per minute especially when flying low over the ocean water. Puffins breed in large colonies along coastal cliffs, offshore island, sea rocks, crevices, or burrows. They have bright colored beaks during their breeding season. They shed these after breeding exposing a small dull beak. Their populations are declining. They are known for their feeding patterns by diving in the water for food. Fossils hae been found in Oregon known as “Hydrotherikornis” an alcid that dates to the Late Eocene, and other fossils of Aethia and Uria date back to the Late Miocene. It is theorized they originated during the Paleocene in the Pacific regions.

Uses: the fatty meat of the younger birds are salted and eaten in various world diets primarily in coastal regions.

Folklore/Spirituality: The genus Fraterculini or Fratercula comes from the Latin “little brother” referring to the black and white plumage that resembles monastic robes. The English name Puffin comes from the appearance of the bird as being swollen or puffed up, with a fat like appearance to the fatty salted meat of the young birds.

This is a work in production. It is not complete.

More information:

If you would like to contact the author about this article, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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Murres

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA.

Murres
~

Article by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

Name: Common Murres

Folk Name: Murre, guillemot, auk, thin billed murre

Taxonomy: Animalia, Chordata, Aves, Charadriiformes, Alcidae, Uria species (common: aalge)

Locality: low-arctic and boreal waters of the North Atlantic and North Pacific. Most of its time is spent at sea, they only spend time on land breeding along rocky cliff shores or islands.

Description: Known as the common murre or common guillemot, these birds are large auks, with a circumpolar distribution spending its time at sea except for breeding along rocky cliffs. They have fast direct flight but are not very agile, they maneuver well underwater diving to depths of 30-60 meters, though maximum depths recorded are around 180 meters. They breed in colonies with high density populations and are often in physical contact with their neighbors, they don’t make nests and lay single eggs they incubate on bare rock ledges which hatch around 30 days of incubation. The infant chick is born downy regulating its own body temperature around day 10, after 20 days they leave the nest for the sea although unable to fly yet upwards of 2 months after birth, they glide with fluttering wings often accompanying the male parent. The female parent stays at the nest upwards of 14 days after the chick leaves. The chick learns to dive as soon as they hit the water. Murres sometimes nest through the winter, though northern populations spend winters farther from their colonies. They often grow to 38-45 cm in length with a 61-73 cm wingspan. Its hard to tell the difference between males and females. The common species during breeding possess black on the head, back and wings, with white underparts. They have a thin dark pointed bill and small rounded dark tail. Face is usually white with a dark spur behind the eye, though some are dark brown rather than black. Legs and bill tend to be grey, though some have been recorded as yellow/gray. Feathers sometimes moult later in the year, but basic plumage occurs as late as may.

Uses:

Folklore/Spirituality: The name comes from the Greek ouriaa – a waterbird mentioned by Athenaeus and the Old Norse alka or “auk”.

This is a work in production. It is not complete.

More information:

If you would like to contact the author about this article, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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Lahars

Lahars

A volcanic mudflow is called a “lahar”. Usually a term depicting a violent type of debris flow or mud flow consisting of a pyro-clastic slur rocky debris, and water flowing from a volcano usually in a river valley. They are very destructive capable of flowing tens of meters per second and as deep as 140 meters destroying everything in its path.

If you would like to contact the author about this article, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Trail of Fossils. The Pallisades (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27413) – Clarno Unit – John Day Fossil National Monument (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27401). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Oregon. Photos taken August 2, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

Like this review? want more? consider donating a chai, coffee, tea, or meal to the reviewer as a way to say “thank you! I want more …”





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The Dunbrody

The Dunbrody
~ Waterford, Ireland ~

This three-masted tall ship in barque style was built in Quebec around 1845 by Thomas Hamilton for the Graves family – merchants from New Ross, Wexford, Ireland. The ship originated as a cargo vessel transporting timber and guano to Ireland. From 1845 to 1851 during the months of April to September, she brought passengers to North America – helping people escape the potato famine. They could fit 4 passengers in an area of 6′ square and their children. The Brody had a very low mortality rate for its passengers and was not classified as a “coffin ship” like many others like her who lost roughly 50% of their passengers during the potato famine exodus. It is believed that was due to the fact that the captains John Baldwin and John W. Williams were praised to their dedication for the safe passage. There was one passage with 313 passengers out of which only 6 died. She was sold by the Graves family in 1869. She was then taken by her new owners in 1874 from Cardiff to Quebec and ran aground in the Saint Lawrence River. She was then salvaged, repaired, and sold – then in 1875 was foundered on the Labrador coast and lost. The ship you see here is a replica.

Rated: 5 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

August 1, 2012: The Dunbrody, Waterford, Ireland. (c) 2012 – photography by Leaf McGowan, technogypsie.com. To purchase this photo, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/?tcp_product_category=photo
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http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/
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Wheeler High Shool Fossil Beds (Fossil, Oregon)

Wheeler High School Fossil Beds
~ Wheeler High School, Fossil, Oregon * (541) 763-4146 ~
https://www.oregonpaleolandscenter.com/wheeler-high-school-fossil-beds

In the town of Fossil Oregon one can easily collect fossils for a mere $5 entrance fee (donation based on honor system in a drop-box). The fossil beds are located behind the Wheeler High School and is a great place to learn the history, geology, fossils, and recreation of the town. The fossil beds are a thinly-bedded outcrop of shale on the hill behind the school that represents the bed of a shallow lake that once sat there over 33 million hears ago during the Oligoene boasting a temperate mild and wet climate. Most of the fossils at this location are primarily leaves and branches of deciduous trees that grew along the adjacent stream banks and wetlands. Some of the more common trees are oak, ash, maple, sycamore, alder, and rose. There was a metasequoia that dropped its needs into the lake every fall and can be found here. There have been fossils of salamanders and fish found nearby.

A information board with instructions about digging for fossils and a place to pay for impact on the site, use of tools, etc. The Fossil Beds are owned by the Fossil School District – all fees and donations help pay for unfunded and under funded programs such as Sports, Music, Arts, and After School Reading. They ask for a $5 donated entrance fee based on the honor system.

“Here in the City of Fossil lies an abundance of fossil plant deposits, ranging in age from one million to 32 million years ago. These fossils are part of the “Bridge Creek Flora” the general scientific term given to fossilized plant deposits found in the John Day River basin of north central Oregon – an area that encompasses presentday Fossil to Mitchell to the John Day Valley. Many of these remnants of fossilized flora are distant relatives of similar species found today in regions of eastern Europe and Asia. Preserved under cataclysmic events, these delicate fossilized leaves, ferns, fruits, stems, and seeds reflect Earth’s passages and give scientists clues about ancient ecosystems.”

Alder
“Alnus newberry – one of the most common plant fossils found here, small alder trees were found at the edges of ancient lake basins”.

Hawthorn
“Crataegus merriamiii – Small deciduous trees distantly related to present day hawthor trees found in eastern Europe and Asia.”

Metasequoia
“An ancient species, a small group of closely related evergreen metasequoias were recently discovered in an isolated range of present day China.”

Ash
“Fraxinus species – Ancient ash trees were much smaller than today’s species. Scientists say they grew abundantly along prehistoric lakesides.”

Fern
“Polypodium – Rare single specimens have been found here. distant relatives to today’s woodland ferns.”

Walnut
“Juglandiphyllites cryptatus – Walnut trees were once prolific in this region although the discovery of well preserved leaves and fruits is still a rare occurence.”

Extinct Fruit
“Fossilized fruit and fruit capsules are rare among the Bridge Creek Flora and this unknown tree or shrub species is long extinct.”

Sumac
“Rhus lequereuxii – somewhat similar to present day sumac found across North America, ancient specimens included both deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs”.

Pine Needles
“Pinus johndayensis – Only one type of ancient pine has been discovered in the Fossil locale; hece the species has been named for the John Day River basin.”

Unknown Monocot Species
“Simple monocotledon leaf composites of a yet-unknown ancient plant species.”

Oak
“Quercus consimilis – the leaes of prehistoric oaks – both deciduous and evergreen species – were not lobbed. Fossilized acorns have not yet been discovered here.”

Unknown Dicot Species
“An unknown species with complex leaves perhaps related to ancient sumacs.”

Basswood
“Tilia fossilensis – a concentration of fossilized ancient basswood trees also referred to as linden was found only in a single strata at these fossil beds.”

Yelp Reviews

Rated: 4 of 5 stars. ~ Review by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

If you would like to contact the author about this review, need a re-review, would like to advertise on this page, or have information to add, please contact us at technogypsie@gmail.com.

Digging Fossils at the Fossil Beds (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27387) in Fossil, Oregon (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=27373). Volcanic Legacy: Chronicle 25 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf, Lady Etain, and Prince Cian. Adventures in Washington, Oregon, Idaho & Wyoming. Photos taken August 1, 2016. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21521. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2015/2016 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowan and Thomas Baurley. All rights reserved. www.technogypsie.com/photography

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Sheepherder’s Wagon

A Sheepherder’s Wagon

There is an excellent donated wagon in Fossil, Oregon. In the front of the school that was built in the 1930’s and last used in 1984 containing all the original equipment used by the sheepherder. “This wagon was home to the sheepherder and his dogs twelve months of the year. Moved as the sheep followed the grass the herder followed the sheep and the wagon followed the herd.” It was donated by the Steiwer Family.

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