El Morro Ware


Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida

El Morro Ware
1550 C.E. to 1770 C.E.
Common: Iberia, Mexico; the Carribean region; North Florida, U.S.A.

Florida Museum of Natural History Ceramic Guide: El Morro Ware

El Morro ware is a lead glazed coarse earthenware from most likely originates from Iberia, Mexico and was produced from 1550-1700 CE. It is poorly compacted, sand-tempered, coarse earthenware that can range in color from a reddish brown to a cream or beige tint. The surface of the pottery is minimally smoothed with a thin, transparent lead glaze that was applied to at least one, if not both surfaces. The sand tempering is obvious due to the common protrusions into the glaze giving a gritty or granular surface and is often a yellow orange, green or rust color. Common vessels found are pitchers, plato, taza, escudilla, bowls, and bacins. It sticks out as “El Morro” from other lead glazed earthenware common from Spanish and Carribean sites in the 16th century due to the gritty texture, and thin transparent glaze with a poorly smoothed surface. Both Smith (1962) and Deagan (1987) have written classifications for this pottery type.


Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida


    “Ship wreck artifacts: from Florida’s coast. (5) El Morro ware fragments: this common lead glazed pottery, known as El Morro ware, was in use from about 1550 to 1770 CE. The term “El Morro” was derived by a Florida reearcher and generally is not used outside of Florida. (6) El Morro ware fragments. (7) El Morro water rim fragment. ” ~ Diorama/display in the Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida. (Photo 091712-55.jpg) Ship Wreck artifacts: http://www.piraterelief.com/plank/?p=277 (Expected publication January 2013).


    Florida Museum of Natural History, Tallahassee, Florida

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