Gray Whales

Names: Gray Whales, whales, devil fish; Kingdom: Animalia; Phylum: Chordata; Class: Mammalia; Order: Artiodactyla; Infraorder: Cetacea; Family: Eschrichtiidae; Genus: Eschrichtius; Species: E. robustus.

Description:

Gray Whales are known around the world as either the gray back whale, Pacific gray whale, or california gray whale. They grow upwards of 49 feet in length with over 49 tons of weight, living to approximately 55-70 years in age. They are described as gray with gray patches and white mottling on dark gray skin. They are baleen whales that migrate annually, feeding and breeding in certain regions. Known as devil fish for the manner of how they fight when hunted. They are descendants of filter-feeding whales dated to the Oligocene (30 million years ago). Females show highly synchronized reproduction with oestrus occuring in late November/early December involving multiple mates that coincides with annual migration. Gestation is approximately 12 and a half months. Calves are born in a 6 week window during mid January. Calves are born tail first approximately 13 feet in length, single birth, mammalian birth. Mother lactates for 7 months after birth, then calves are weaned and maternal care decreases. Gray whales tend to locate themselves in lagoons during lactation to protect the newborns from sharks and orcas. They have complex breeding patterns involving 3 or more animals – male and female whales hit puberty around 8 years. Gray Whales feed mainly on benthic crustaceans by turning on its side and scooping up sediments from the ocean floor, using its baleen or whalebone as a sieve capturing small sea animals.

Habitat/Locale: Eastern North Pacific of the Americas; endangered in the western North Pacific (Asia) areas. North Atlantic.

Diet: Primarily benthic crustaceans and plankton

Uses: whale oil, meat, fat, bones for tools. Humans have challenged the gray whale to extinction level threats from whaling.

History:

Folklore/Mythology:

Spirituality:

This is a work in production. It is incomplete.

References/Recommended Reading:


  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
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  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at
  • Website referenced 2/27/18 at

Gray Whales:  http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3235. "While a small number of gray whales remain in the wates off Yaquina Head for most of the year, the entire population swims by twice on their annual migration.  Migrating gray whales - yaquina Head is one of the best places along the coast of western North America to view gray whales. These 45 foot (14 m ) long whales migrate annually between their breeding lagoons in Baja California and their sumer feeding grounds in the berring and Chukchi Seas.  The migration north can be seen from yaquina Head from March through May. Whales heading south pass by here from December to early February. How do I find whales? The best way to spot gray whales here is to locate other people who have already found them! Or you can scan out toward the horizon for spouts - wisps of exhaled air which are usually more vetical and mist-like than are the white-caps of waves. Migrating whales can be anywhere from about 1/2 mile to two miles or more away which makes them hard to find. "~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon. http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775. 1/27/16: Chronicles 23: Delving the Oregon Coast and Willamette Valley:  http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=19727 -   Photos from  February 2016 . (c) 2016 - photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Eadaoin Bineid / Leaf McGowan and/or Etain DeDanann of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).

Gray Whales: http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3235. “While a small number of gray whales remain in the wates off Yaquina Head for most of the year, the entire population swims by twice on their annual migration. Migrating gray whales – yaquina Head is one of the best places along the coast of western North America to view gray whales. These 45 foot (14 m ) long whales migrate annually between their breeding lagoons in Baja California and their sumer feeding grounds in the berring and Chukchi Seas. The migration north can be seen from yaquina Head from March through May. Whales heading south pass by here from December to early February. How do I find whales? The best way to spot gray whales here is to locate other people who have already found them! Or you can scan out toward the horizon for spouts – wisps of exhaled air which are usually more vetical and mist-like than are the white-caps of waves. Migrating whales can be anywhere from about 1/2 mile to two miles or more away which makes them hard to find. “~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon. http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775. 1/27/16: Chronicles 23: Delving the Oregon Coast and Willamette Valley: http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=19727 – Photos from February 2016 . (c) 2016 – photo by Photographers Thomas Baurley / Eadaoin Bineid / Leaf McGowan and/or Etain DeDanann of Technogypsie Productions Photography: (www.technogypsie.com/photography/).

Gray Whales: http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3235. “While a small number of gray whales remain in the wates off Yaquina Head for most of the year, the entire population swims by twice on their annual migration. Migrating gray whales – yaquina Head is one of the best places along the coast of western North America to view gray whales. These 45 foot (14 m ) long whales migrate annually between their breeding lagoons in Baja California and their sumer feeding grounds in the berring and Chukchi Seas. The migration north can be seen from yaquina Head from March through May. Whales heading south pass by here from December to early February. How do I find whales? The best way to spot gray whales here is to locate other people who have already found them! Or you can scan out toward the horizon for spouts – wisps of exhaled air which are usually more vetical and mist-like than are the white-caps of waves. Migrating whales can be anywhere from about 1/2 mile to two miles or more away which makes them hard to find. “~ information sign at Yaquina Head National Park, Newport, Oregon. http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=25775

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