Baleen

WHALING
Baleen art – Pacific Northwest Tribal Art (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3803)

Baleen Arts and Crafts

Baleen: “A Whale of a Story: The Inupiaq of northern Alaska have hunted bowhead whates and collected baleen for hundrreds of years. Although called ‘whale bone’ by Westerners, baleen is a fibrous sieve-like material that grows on both sides of a plankton-eating whale’s tongue and is made of the same material as hair, horn, and figernails. Prior to contact with Westerners, baleen was used to make items such as buckets, ice scoops, sled runner, lashings, fishing line, and nets. By 1875 and until modern plastics became available, Westerners used baleen to make things such as buggy whips, umbrella ribs, and corset stays for women. Inupiaq mostly from the villages of Barrow, Point Hope, and Wainwright, began to use baleen to make items for trade and sale to non-natives. Baleen was primarily used by male artists because baleen is a hard material and historically in their culture, only men used hard materials. These artists made items such as models and baskets. The first known baleen basket was made by an artist named Kinguktuk from Barrow, Alaska between 1914 and 1918 for a local resident named Charles Brower. Brower had asked Kinguktuk to copy a willow-root basket in baleen. Hunting bowhead whales remains an important part of the lives of many Inupiaq and artists continue to use baleen in new and innovative ways.”~display at Denver Art Museum.
Displayed arts of Baleen in the Pacific Northwest Indians exhibit at the Denver Art Museum.

WHALING
Baleen: “A Whale of a Story: The Inupiaq of northern Alaska have hunted bowhead whates and collected baleen for hundrreds of years. Although called ‘whale bone’ by Westerners, baleen is a fibrous sieve-like material that grows on both sides of a plankton-eating whale’s tongue and is made of the same material as hair, horn, and figernails. Prior to contact with Westerners, baleen was used to make items such as buckets, ice scoops, sled runner, lashings, fishing line, and nets. By 1875 and until modern plastics became available, Westerners used baleen to make things such as buggy whips, umbrella ribs, and corset stays for women. Inupiaq mostly from the villages of Barrow, Point Hope, and Wainwright, began to use baleen to make items for trade and sale to non-natives. Baleen was primarily used by male artists because baleen is a hard material and historically in their culture, only men used hard materials. These artists made items such as models and baskets. The first known baleen basket was made by an artist named Kinguktuk from Barrow, Alaska between 1914 and 1918 for a local resident named Charles Brower. Brower had asked Kinguktuk to copy a willow-root basket in baleen. Hunting bowhead whales remains an important part of the lives of many Inupiaq and artists continue to use baleen in new and innovative ways.”~display at Denver Art Museum. Pacific Northwest Tribal Art (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3803); Pacific Northwest Tribes (http://www.technogypsie.com/science/?p=3467) Exhibit – Denver Museum of Art/ Art Museum (http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/?p=838). Wandering around Denver, Colorado. New Life in Colorado: Chronicle 26 – Chronicles of Sir Thomas Leaf and Prince Cian. Adventures in Colorado. Photos taken Saturday, August 5, 2017. To read the adventures, visit http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/?p=21965. To read reviews, visit: www.technogypsie.com/reviews. All photos and articles (c) 2017 Technogypsie.com – by Leaf McGowa

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