Cormorants

Cormorants
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Article by Leaf McGowan/Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions ~

Name: Cormorant

Folk Name: Cormorant, shags

Taxonomy: Animalia, Chordata, Aves, Suliformes; Phalacrocoracidae; Phalacrocorax

Locality: Worldwide – Coastal regions. Pacific Northwest in the Americas. P. carbo and P. aristotelis only two in British Isles. They have not been found in the Pacific Islands.

Description: These birds are large birds weighing upwards of 11 lbs with a 18-39 inch wing span, mostly dark feathered, with long, thin, hooked bills. There are over 40 species of the Cormorants or Phalacrocoracidae. Feet webbing are between the four toes. They eat fish by diving from the surface propelling themselves underwater with their feet and wings, recorded diving as deep as 45 meters. They nest in colonies around rock islands, rocky cliffs, islets, along the shore, and in trees. Originally they are deduced to have originated from fresh water environments.

Uses:

Folklore/Spirituality: The name comes from the Greek phalakros meaning “bald” and κόραξ meaning “raven”. The name “Cormoran” comes from the Legends in Cornwall about the sea giant named “Cormoran” in the tale of Jack the Giant Killer.

This is a work in production. It is not complete.

More information:



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Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

“An Ancient Lava Flow – Fourteen million years ago, lava gushed from huge fissures in Eastern Oregon and Washington and flowed 300 miles (500 km) to the sea. Rugged and eroded – Yaquina Head is a western-most toe of the Ginkgo Basalt flow of the Columbia River Basalts. Erosion and faulitng have shaped this lava delta into its present rugged form. Fossiles remain – Clams, snails, marine mammals and other animals are fossilized in the buff-colored sandstone cliffs known as the Astoria Formation (located behind the sandy beaches). The forests beyond – From here on a clear day you can see perhaps 15,000 acres (6,000 ha) of coastal forests. The Bureau of Land Management manages forest watersheds, wildlife, cultural sites, and recreational opportunities on 2.2 million acres (880,000 ha) in western Oregon. Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

“Bird sounds at sea – While seabirds lack the beautiful songs of the thrushes and wrens, all can vocalize – sometimes loudly and at great length! Birds use their oices to attract mates, to establish territory, and to indentify their offspring, as well as to register alarm, contentment and the location of food sources. Listen to the sounds these birds make. The surf scoter is a duck: the others are seabirds”. “Protecting Seabirds – to encourage nesting sites, BLM and US Fish and Wildlife Service biologists want to keep this area natural. Your role? just stay behind the fences and enjoy watching the birds. ” “Seabirds are here year round – seven species of seabirds nest here on the cliffs or rocky offshore islets. Many more seabirds feed and rest here during their migrations to and from their northern breeding sites.” “Common mures – are the most abundant nesting seabird at Yaquina Head. Over 25,000 common murres breed on Colony Rock. Each pair of murres lays a single, pear-shaped egg on this rocky island.” “Tuffed puffins – arrive in April and nest in burrows (up to 5 feet deep) or in crevics in May. Because there is so little soil on the cliffs at Yaquina Head, only a few pairs have found nest crevices – mostly on the ocean side of Colony Rock, in front of this deck.” “Pigeon guillemots – return to mid to late March and build their nests 10-40 feet above the water. Pairs normally use the same nesting site from year to year.” “Pelagic cormorants – cement their nests of seaweed and grass to the cliffsides with excrement. Compared to many other breeding seabirds, their nests are spaced widely apart.” “Brandt’s cormorants – are highly sociable and breed in large colonies. Their nests are close together – usually only pecking distance apart.” “Glaucous winged gulls and western gulls – both build bowl-shaped nests lined with local vegetation. At Yaquina Head their eggs begin hatching in June”. Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coa

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area NPS, Newport, Oregon. Oregon Coastline 2013: Oregon Coast, Oregon, USA. Friday, August 3, 2013. (c) 2013: Photo by Leaf McGowan, Thomas Baurley, Technogypsie Productions. More information, copy of photo, to purchase, or to obtain permission to reprint visit http://www.technogypsie.com/photography/. To follow the adventures, go to http://www.technogypsie.com/chronicles/ or travel tales http://www.technogypsie.com/reviews/

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